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Found 8 results

  1. Celiac.com 05/09/2019 - My Kitchen Rules show finalist, Scott Gooding, is not a household name in the U.S. However, with a bit of luck, his new, Good Place, health-centered free-from eateries are fast becoming a household word in Australia. Everything on the Good Place menu is gluten and soy free, and most items are low in carbs and sugar. The restaurant is slated to debut locations in Blacktown and Central Park in Sydney, and Buddina and Surfers Paradise in Queensland. Gooding’s Sydney South restaurant is now open at Westfield Miranda. Open 24 hours a day, every day, the restaurant features breakfast lunch and dinner. Dishes include a Kakadu Smoothie Bowl with coconut cream, MCT oil, Kakadu plum and peanut butter, and the pesto omelette – with chargrilled greens. Dinner items include a vegan curry, tender ox cheeks in a sticky sauce, with chargrilled greens, and a 12-hour slow-cooked lamb with roast potatoes and Café de Paris butter. For the sweet tooth, The Good Place features semi-freddo made with raspberries, dark chocolate, coconut, macadamia and coconut kefir, and Raspberry Floater, a house-made chocolate ice cream floated in hemp organic kombucha. For those of drinking age, they offer numerous "health-conscious" cocktails, and certified organic wines on offer. Good Place also goes the extra mile, and sources all their produce in a sustainable and ethical way, when possible. Learn more about The Good Place at thebrag.com
  2. Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease. USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.” Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com. Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. Source: FoodProcessing.com.au
  3. Celiac.com 04/05/2017 - To mark the start of Coeliac Awareness Week, Coeliac Australia and Nestlé Professional have launched Gluten Free Online Training – an interactive learning resource for foodservice professionals looking to expand their understanding of gluten free food practice throughout the hospitality industry. Under the guidance of Australian chef and author Tobie Puttock, the project will train up to 30,000 students at all TAFEs and culinary institutes in the protocols for gluten-free food preparation and service. People who successfully complete the training earn a Certificate of Achievement, which covers them for three years under Coeliac Australia's Gluten Free Standard for Foodservice Providers. Cathy Di Bella, special projects officer at Coeliac Australia, says training in safe gluten-free food prep and handling practices is a huge stepping stone to meet the future needs of the foodservice industry. Karen Kingham, dietitian and brand nutritionist at Nestlé Professional, says that the online training is intended to help people working in foodservice to become familiar with gluten-free customer and prep and server issues. The goal is to promote gluten-free awareness and protocols to culinary and food industry workers, to benefit them, the industry, and its patrons. "As most of us know celiac disease is real and symptoms are easily triggered, and I believe this should be treated the same as someone with perhaps a peanut allergy, and therefore food handling is of the utmost importance," said Puttock. It's good to see such influential figures in the food industry bringing such seriousness and professionalism to the preparation and handling of gluten-free foods. Stay tuned for more on this and other gluten-free stories. For more information: Australia's Gluten Free Online Training.
  4. Celiac.com 03/31/2016 - Kellogg has announced that gluten-free versions of its Corn Flakes and Special K cereals will mark its gluten-free debut into the Australian cereal market. Kellogg calls the products a response to growing demand for gluten-free products from consumers with celiac disease and gluten intolerance. "We continue to see a growing number of consumers, including coeliac disease sufferers, requesting gluten free alternatives to our popular cereals." In formulating their new products, Kellogg set out to combat a perception in the Australian cereal market that gluten-free cereals routinely failed to "deliver a great taste experience that's consistent with products containing gluten," said Janine Brooker, portfolio marketing manager for Kellogg Australia. Kellogg "…wanted to make sure that our gluten-free Corn Flakes and Special K taste just as good as the original classics," Brooker added. Kellogg's Corn Flakes Gluten Free and Special K Gluten Free are available in 330g boxes at supermarkets across Australia.
  5. Hi all, As I mentioned in a thread a few weeks ago, I've recently started a gluten challenge after 3 years of very strict gluten free eating. I've got a biopsy in 2 weeks time (after which I will have been eating gluten for 5 weeks and 2 days in total - I've been eating around 6 slices of bread per day or equivalent). 2 weeks into the gluten challenge I had blood tests done. Deamidated Gliadin IgA * 99 U/mL ( <15 ) Deamidated Gliadin IgG <1 U/mL ( <15 ) Tissue Transglutaminase IgA <1 U/mL ( <15 ) Tissue Transglutaminase IgG <1 U/mL ( <15 ) My results from 2010 are as follows (following many years of low gluten, but not gluten free eating): Gliadin IgA Abs * 47 U/mL ( 0 - 20 ) tTG IgA/IgG * 52 U/mL ( 0 - 20 ) When I had a biopsy in 2010, there wasn't any sign of Villous atrophy. I was wondering after my latest blood test if I might be going for a biopsy too soon? I understand that the 99 U/mL result for Gliadin IgA suggests that there's something going on, but am I understanding correctly that the other results (the IgG and the tissue results) suggest that there's no sign of damage being done? Again, whatever the result I will be going back to strict gluten free eating. I'm definitely intolerant to the stuff. Thanks...!
  6. Celiac.com 04/06/2009 - Celiac sufferers around the globe are anxiously awaiting word from Australia, as the world's first vaccine trials for the treatment of celiac disease get underway in Melbourne. In April, Bob Anderson, of the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical research, will begin the initial phase of the first-ever trials for a celiac vaccine that, if successful, might just mean the end of gluten-free diets for those with celiac disease. The treatment has been successful in mice and is now ready to be tested on humans. In this initial phase, 40 volunteers with celiac disease will receive doses of the vaccine over an 11-month period to determine that it will cause no harm. Once researchers make sure the vaccine is safe, they will begin phase II trial, wherein they give vaccine doses to trial subjects and evaluate their responses to gluten challenges to determine the efficacy of the vaccine. Evaluation will include an examination of immune response and intestinal condition to determine the level of gluten tolerance. The vaccine therapy involves repeatedly injecting solutions of gluten at increasing concentrations. The goal is to reduce and ultimately eliminate gluten sensitivity slowly, in a manner similar to common allergy desensitization treatments. The road to the development of this treatment has not been easy. Dr. Anderson is that rare combination of medical doctor (gastroenterologist) and PhD scientist who is able to develop practical treatments from bedside observations. After struggling to gain funding throughout his research career, he eventually patented his vaccine and co-founded Nexpep in an effort to develop the vaccine on his own. Because, like common dust and hay fever allergy therapies, this treatment approach may allow people with celiac disease to actually consume the gluten that produces the toxic reaction and reduce or even eliminate that reaction via vaccination. This approach will also serve as a model for a vaccine approach for other immune conditions such as type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Until recently, doctors thought celiac disease was rare. But according to statistics, it is twice as common as type1 diabetes or breast cancer. Celiac disease is now known to strike one per cent of Americans, but although modern blood testing has made early detection accurate and efficient, most people with celiac disease still do not know that they have it. Just 3% of sufferers have been diagnosed, leaving nearly 3 million people undiagnosed, and therefore unable to benefit form simple treatment in the form of a gluten-free diet. Long-term risks for untreated celiac disease include malnutrition, infertility, osteoporotic fractures, liver failure and various cancers. Symptoms can vary between individuals, with some experiencing no symptoms at all, even though damage to the bowel and general health still occurs whether or not symptoms are present. Presently, long-term monitoring of dietary compliance for celiac patients is haphazard at best, and standards for gluten-free products have yet to take effect in the USA and other countries. Geoff Withers, director of pediatric gastroenterology at Brisbane's Royal Children's Hospital, points out that a gluten-free diet is "notoriously difficult. It is expensive and lifelong, and comes at a cost to the individual." Even treatment with a gluten-free disease is no panacea. People on gluten-free diets routinely suffer from a deficiency of certain vitamins, especially B vitamins. Roughly half of those following gluten-free diets have impaired intestinal healing due to compliance issues, and that means they are in danger of associated risks which include cancer. A successful vaccine could have massive consequences for treatment of celiac disease, and might radically improve the lives of those with the condition.
  7. Coeliac Australia (our national office) PO Box 271 Wahroonga NSW 2076 www.coeliac.org.au Ph: +61 2 9487 5088 Tollfree: 1300 990 273 Fax: +61 2 9487 5177 Email: info@coeliac.org.au Our States office's details are as follows: Coeliac New South Wales & ACT Suite 1, 41-45 Pacific Highway (corner of Yardley Avenue) Waitara NSW 2077 www.coeliac.org.au Ph: +61 2 9487 5088 Tollfree: 1300 458 836 (for country callers in NSW/ACT only) Fax: +61 2 9487 5177 Email: nsw@coeliac.org.au Coeliac Queensland PO Box 3455 Newmarket QLD 4051 www.coeliac.org.au Ph: +61 7 3356 4446 Tollfree: 1300 458 836 (for country callers in Queensland only) Fax: +61 7 3356 4474 Email: qld@coeliac.org.au Coeliac South Australia & Northern Territory Unit 5 & 6, 88 Glynburn Road Hectorville SA 5073 www.coeliac.org.au Ph: +61 8 8336 1476 Tollfree: 1300 458 836 (for country callers in South Australia & Northern Territory only) Fax: +61 8 8365 1265 Email: sant@coeliac.org.au Coeliac Victoria & Tasmania PO Box 89 Holmesglen VIC 3148 www.coeliac.org.au Ph: +61 3 9808 5566 Tollfree: 1300 458 836 (for country callers in Victoria & Tasmania only) Fax: +61 3 9808 9922 Email: victas@coeliac.org.au Coeliac Western Australia PO Box 726 Bentley WA 6982 www.coeliac.org.au Ph: +61 8 9451 9255 Tollfree: 1300 458 836 (for country callers in Western Australia only) Fax: +61 8 9451 9266 Email: wa@coeliac.org.au
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