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Found 19 results

  1. Celiac.com 10/16/2018 - Apparently, local St. Louis radio station Z1077 hosts a show called “Dirty Little Secret.” Recently, a woman caller to the show drew ire from listeners after she claimed that she worked at a local bakery, and that she routinely lied to customers about the gluten-free status of baked goods. The woman said she often told customers that there was no gluten in baked goods that were not gluten-free, according to local tv station KTVI. Apparently the woman thought this was funny. However, for people who cannot eat gluten because they have celiac disease, telling people that food is gluten-free when it is not is about as funny as telling a diabetic that food is sugar-free when it is not. Now, of course, eating gluten is not as immediately dangerous for most celiacs as sugar is for diabetics, but the basic analogy holds. That’s because many people with celiac disease suffer horrible symptoms when they accidentally eat gluten, including extreme intestinal pain, bloating, diarrhea, and other problems. Some people experience more extreme reactions that leave them in emergency rooms. As part of a story on the “joke” segment, KTVI interviewed celiac sufferer Dana Smith, who found the punchline to be less than funny. “It’s absolutely dangerous, somebody could get very sick,” said Smith. KTVI also interviewed at least one doctor, Dr. Reuben Aymerich of SSM St. Clare Hospital, who pointed out that, while celiac disease is “not like diabetes where you can reduce the amount of sugar intake and make up for it later, it’s thought you need to be 100 percent compliant if you can.” For her part, Smith sought to use the incident as a teaching moment. She alerted the folks at Z1077 and tried to point out how serious being gluten-free is for many people. Mary Michaels, owner of Gluten Free at Last Bakery in Maryville, Illinois, says it’s time people became more respectful. “I wouldn’t make fun of you if you had diabetes or a heart condition it’s kind of like that,” Michals said. We will likely never know if the radio station caller was telling the truth, or just putting listeners on. The Z1077 morning team did post a follow-up comment, which stated that they take celiac disease seriously, and that they did not intend to offend anyone. One host said his mom has celiac disease. It’s good to see a positive response from the radio station. Their prank was short-sighted, and the caller deserved to be called out on her poor behavior. Hopefully, they have learned their lesson and will avoid such foolishness in the future. Let us know your thoughts below.
  2. Celiac.com 07/11/2018 - For people with celiac disease, finding decent gluten-free bread is like searching gold. Many have given up on bread entirely and others begrudgingly relate themselves to the ignominious frozen aisle at their supermarket and content themselves with one of the many dry, shriveled, flavorless loaves that proudly tout the gluten-free label. For these people, the idea of freshly baked bread is a distant, if comforting, memory. The idea of going to Paris and marching into a boulangerie and walking out with a warm, tasty, gluten-free baguette that was freshly baked on the premises that morning, is like a dream. Now, in some Parisian bakeries, that dream is becoming a reality. And the tear of joy from the thankful gluten-free masses are sure to follow. These days, a single sign on the awning speaks to hungry customers who peruse the tarts and chou buns, and the loaves that fill the cooling on racks behind a glass pane at Chambelland boulangerie and café in Paris’ 11th arrondissement. The sign lettered in French translates: “artisan baker; flour producer; naturally gluten free.” That’s right. Naturally gluten-free. At a bakery. In Paris. Only the flat, focaccia-style loaves, and the absence of baguettes, tells customers that this bakery is something different. Chambelland opened its doors in 2014 and continues to do a brisk business in delicious, freshly baked gluten-free breads and other goods. The boulangerie is the work of Narhaniel Doboin and his business partner, Thomas Teffri-Chambelland. They use flour made of grains including rice, buckwheat and sorghum to make delicious gluten-free baked goods. Doboin says that customers queued in the rain on the first day, hardly believing their eyes, some began to cry. For gluten-free Parisians, there was a time before Chambelland, and the time after. If you find yourself in Paris, be sure to search them out for what is sure to be a gluten-free delight. Or maybe book your ticket now. Read more at: Independent.co.uk
  3. MinnesotaCeliac

    Maui Hawaii Experience

    Hello all, This past February I rented a condo on Maui (not for from Lahaina). I had a great experience and was able to find two 100% gluten free places to eat on the island (one a restaurant and the other a bakery). I usually mitigate all risk by not eating out, but felt comfortable enough with these two places to give them try. I also had no problem finding gluten-free foods at the supermarkets. The Maui Sugar shop Organic/gluten free Bakery was an awesome find and the owners are some awesome folks. It is in Lahainia and hard to find (I stumbled upon it because I took a wrong turn trying to find a parking spot). Most shops will actually be on Front street, but this little gem is tucked in a parking lot (if you find Panama Jacks on Front street...walk to the parking lot in back and it will be a few storefronts down in the same building as Panama Jacks back door. The treats are fantastic and so are the owners (I met each of them on separate visits and both are awesome folks). I only visited twice as I found them at the end of my vacation. I would have stopped there every day if I found them earlier. They are doing it right and earned my business (you just want folks like that to succeed). I also went to the Maui Brick Oven in Kihei. They are open for dinner. Don't let the strip mall location turn you away. Stop in and give them a try. You may find yourself grabbing a pizza to go too. There are plenty of gluten free groceries to be had in stores. There is a wholefoods in Kahului and the Safeway in Lahaina that had enough gluten free items to be fine (there was another grocery store closer to my condo that also had gluten-free food but not a as much(can't remember the name right now). Food can be expensive, but if you shop at safeway sign up for there rewards card (I think that is what they called it) and you'll get some good discounts. They also stock red-bridge if you want a gluten-free beer. If you have any questions let me know!
  4. Celiac.com 06/27/2016 - With her gluten-free bakery "Jennifer's Way" facing a $43 million lawsuit from investors, including her own husband, British model Louis Dowler, former "Blue Bloods" star Jennifer Esposito has reportedly skipped town for an "undetermined amount of time" in Denmark. Esposito's investment partners filed their suit in March, alledging, among other things, that Esposito's bakery is failing, and that she redirected the company's website to her personal blog and told consumers the products couldn't be trusted. "Esposito has instilled and promoted a groundless and downright false sense of fear that the very same products with the same recipes, coming from the same facility, that she once stood behind, are now unsafe to consume," the lawsuit reads. Esposito was previously married to actor Bradley Cooper and engaged two more times before she married Dowler in 2014. In addition to the suit, she is now also in the process of divorcing Dowler, who is, as noted above, one of the investment partners who brought the suit against her. Esposito made headlines in 2012, when she was put on indefinite leave from the CBS show "Blue Bloods" after informing the network of her celiac disease diagnosis. According to Esposito's tweets: "CBS. . . PUT me on unpaid leave and has blocked me from working anywhere else after my doc said u needed a reduced schedule due to celiac." According to a statement by CBS, "Jennifer has informed us that she is only available to work on a very limited part-time schedule. As a result, she's unable to perform the demands of her role and we regretfully had to put her character on a leave of absence . . . We hope that she will be able to return at some point in the future." Read more at Fox News.
  5. Celiac.com 05/06/2016 - For an indication of just how quickly gluten-free food products are revolutionizing the food and beverage industry across the globe, look no further than the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Citizens of the UAE have high rates of diabetes. In fact, UAE ranks in the 10 top countries worldwide for the percentage of adults with diabetes. Other auto-immune conditions, such as celiac disease are also on the rise. Enter Tawa Bakery, the UAE's first dedicated gluten-free bakery which has opened on the Al Muneera Development at Al Raha Beach in Abu Dhabi, the UAE capital. Tawa offers a completely new experience for food lovers in the UAE with its 100 percent gluten-free menu, specifically designed to provide good, healthy food for people with auto immune disorders such as celiac disease. Launched by Dubai-based Glee Hospitality Solutions, Tawa Bakery mirrors the rising popularity of gluten-free diets across the globe in general, and in the region, in particular. Tawa offers a wide selection of breads, sandwiches, healthy meals, super foods, cakes and pastry items, all made with quality, healthy, organic and gluten-free ingredients. According to Abdul Kader Saadi, the managing director at Glee Hospitality Solutions, "Tawa Bakery is truly 100 per cent gluten-free and uses only those gluten-free items and ingredients to avoid cross contamination, with breads and baked goods to cater to the health dietary requirements of people." Source: the-mea.co.uk
  6. There are good and bad versions of milk chocolate chip cookies...and then there are great versions like The Bakery Gluten-Free Milk Chocolate Chip Cookies. I happen to love the soft and chewy-style chocolate chip cookies, and these cookies definitely fit that bill. They have a fresh-baked taste and feel, and the aroma that poured forth when I first opened the package was too good to put into words—their taste was simply outstanding. Each package contains 5 large cookies, and I'll bet you can't eat just one! The Bakery Gluten-Free Milk Chocolate Chip Cookies are available in the bakery section of your local Walmart. For more info visit: http://www.walmart.com/ip/The-Bakery-at-Wal-Mart-Gluten-Free-Milk-Chocolate-Chip-Cookies-5-count-8.8-oz/40556796 Review written by Scott Adams.
  7. If you enjoy rich, moist and super chocolaty brownies, then you are going to absolutely love The Bakery Gluten-Free Chocolate Brownies. It has been a long time since I've had brownies that taste this great. The Bakery Gluten-Free Chocolate Brownies are clearly made for the true chocolate brownie lover in you, and I am very impressed with the wonderful texture and flavors that come through in every bite. Another thing I like about these brownies is their size—they are about two large bites each, and 12 of them come in each box. If you have very strong self control you will only eat 2 or 3 of them...but if not...who knows? The Bakery Gluten-Free Chocolate Brownies are available in the bakery section of your local Walmart. For more info visit: http://www.walmart.com/ip/The-Bakery-at-Wal-Mart-Gluten-Free-Chocolate-Brownies-12-count-8.04-oz/40556797 Review written by Scott Adams.
  8. My first impression after trying one of The Bakery Gluten-Free Blueberry Muffins was that these muffins are super-moist, and taste great. They really do taste just like the blueberry muffins that I used to eat before I had to cut out gluten, right down to the chewy consistency, lots of blueberries, and the cake-like flavors and mouth feel. These muffins are also traditional in size, which means they are pretty big, and this is great because so many gluten-free products are smaller than their normal wheat-containing counterparts. Just one of these muffins left me satisfied. The Bakery Gluten-Free Blueberry Muffins are available in the bakery section of your local Walmart. For more info visit: Walmart.com. Review written by Scott Adams.
  9. Celiac.com 09/12/2013 - The most recent industry report by Research and Markets offers a comprehensive analysis of key players in the gluten-free product industry, major gluten-free product types and their sales channels, with commentary on developments and trends. The report also provides a detailed analysis on various phases of numerous aspects of the gluten-free products industry, along with the competitive strategies favored by major industry players. Among the reports insights: As large supermarkets and mass retailers offer more gluten-free products, gluten-free sales by health and natural food stores are declining. Over the last ten years, as millions of Americans have stopped consuming products containing gluten from wheat, barley, or rye, the market for gluten-free foods and other products has shifted, and many products once regarded as specialty or niche products are now regarded as regular grocery items. The report projects global gluten-free product market to reach $6.2 billion at a CAGR of 10.2% by 2018. The report also provides market details and analysis for North America, now the largest market for gluten-free products, and for Europe, which is expected to show significant growth in the market in the near future. Some of that growth is attributed to a steady stream of new gluten-free products in the market, offering additional nutrition, new ingredients or flavors. The also report projects increased demand countries such as U.K., Italy, U.S., Spain, Germany, Australia, Brazil, Canada, and India, among others. The full report is available for purchase at: Gluten-Free Products Market By Type (Bakery & Confectionery, Snacks, Breakfast Cereals, Baking Mixes & Flour, Meat & Poultry Products), Sales Channel (Natural & Conventional) & Geography — Global Trends & Forecasts To 2018
  10. Celiac.com 04/30/2013 - In March of 2013, celebrity Jennifer Esposito opened her very own gluten-free bakery named "Jennifer's Way Bakery." You may recognize her from movies such as Crash and Summer of Sam. Her new establishment can be found in Manhattan's East Village. When Jennifer first started showing her odd symptoms she had no idea they were caused by celiac disease. She went years without treatment because of this. Symptoms included losing a tooth, hair loss, panic disorder, and the inability to stand. According to Allergic Living, Esposito lost a role on CBS's Blue Bloods after requesting reduced workloads because of her health conditions while she was recovering from years of untreated celiac disease. The network came to the conclusion that she was not able to spend the needed time to be on the show, and after a dispute it was no more. Jennifer has also been blogging gluten-free recipes on her blog, jennifersway.org for some time. She now appears happy to be participating in such a full-filling cause. While Jennifer was removed from CBS you can still catch her and her bakery on a show taking place all around New York called Playing with Fire on the E! Network. Source: https://allergicliving.com/index.php/2013/04/10/jennifer-esposito-opens-gluten-free-bakery/
  11. Celiac.com 03/08/2013 - Gluten-free foodies in the Chicago/Evanston area were faced with the closure of one of their best gluten-free bakeries, until a good samaritan stepped forward with a business plan and a check. This past Christmas looked bleak for Rose O'Carroll. The owner of Rose's Wheat Free Bakery and Cafe in Evanston, Illinois was slated to close her doors in the face of a $100,000 debt, until she struck a last minute deal with Camping World CEO Marcus Lemonis to keep open the struggling business. O'Carroll first met Lemonis a year and a half ago, when he began eating gluten-free by choice. After learning through a news article about the bakery's financial troubles, Lemonis contacted O'Carroll and pledged to help out. O'Carroll has said that the bakery's financial troubles are due mainly to high labor costs necessary to produce high-quality gluten-free products. After talking with O'Carroll, Lemonis realized that some easy and fast fixes can make the bakery profitable. One of them is new equipment that will speed production of the bakery's most popular items. Lemonis says he doesn't believe in "making money by cutting jobs." Rather, he says he believes in "making money by increasing sales." With that in mind, he has written a check for $200,000 and established a working capital fund of about $150,000. He emphasizes that every worker will remain on the job. Lemonis calls O'Carroll the epitome of a great baker and a great mind when it comes to baking, though, he adds, she may not have the best business acumen. The rescue of Rose's Wheat Free Bakery and Cafe is not Lemonis' first brush with chartable business efforts. As head of the world's largest RV owners association, Lemonis has appeared on "Secret Millionaire," the ABC show in which business executives provide surprise financial help to struggling communities. He has also appeared on Donald Trump's show, "Celebrity Apprentice." Additionally, Lemonis recently purchased In the Raw, a gluten-free restaurant in Highland Park.
  12. Celiac.com 01/31/2006 – On Tuesday, January 10, 2006, federal authorities raided French Meadow Bakery in Minneapolis, MN, and seized more that 30,000 loaves of spelt and kamut bread and accused the company of mislabeling it as "wheat-free". According to U.S. Attorney Thomas Heffelfinger spelt and kamut share common proteins with wheat that can be just as dangerous to those who are allergic to wheat. French Meadow Bakery considers both grains to be safe alternatives to wheat, and claims that it has only received a single complaint of an allergic reaction during its 16 years in business. According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration the bakery was given plenty of forewarning, as it was told last April that it needed to change its labels and not use "wheat-free" on any products that contain spelt or kamut—but the bakery failed to comply. Wheat is considered one of the top 10 allergens, and allergies to it can be life threatening—especially to allergic children. According to the new Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act, foods that contain spelt or kamut cannot carry "wheat-free" or "wheat-alternative" labels. Heffelfinger believes that mislabeling it will create a serious health risk for a significant portion of the population. French Meadow Bakery has agreed to change its labels and has submitted the revised ones to the Food and Drug Administration for approval, however, on its Web site they have the following statements: "In the meantime the packaging changes have become a challenge for us and several other companies as to whether spelt is wheat or is not...We feel it is more important to look at the nutritional and digestive properties since it (spelt) is not a hybrid of what we call wheat today...We are not alone in this, after reviewing our fellow bakers Web sites, (Rudis Bakery and Food for Life) we learned that they too call Spelt a wheat alternative...Our intention has not and is not to risk the health of our valued customers...As an example of this, we state on our White Spelt and Cinnamon Raisin Spelt products a warning: CELIACS NOTE: SPELT CONTAINS GLUTEN." Celiac.com has also just learned that Purity Foods, a major spelt producer, has applied for an exemption from the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act and in it claim that spelt is not wheat, and that some people who are allergic to wheat can tolerate spelt. However, according to Donald D. Kasarda, Former Research Chemist for the United States Department of Agriculture: The scientific name for bread wheat is Triticum aestivum var. Aestivum—the first part of the name defines the genus (Triticum) and the second part, the species (aestivum). Species falling in the genus Triticum are almost certain to be harmful to celiac patients...Some Triticum species of current concern include Triticum aestivum var. spelta (common names include spelt or spelta), Triticum turgidum var. polonicum (common names include Polish wheat, and, recently, Kamut), and Triticum monococcum var. monococcum (common names include einkorn and small spelt). I recommend that celiac patients avoid grain from these species. Also, given their very close relationship to bread and durum wheats, I think it is unlikely that these grains would be safe for those with classical allergic responses to wheat. The companys bread will remain frozen until the case is settled, and Heffelfinger has indicated that none of the products already on food store shelves across the country will be recalled because the bread would likely exhaust its shelf life by the time a recall could be issued. Celiac.com, however, believes that this issue is settled—spelt and kamut are forms of wheat and those with celiac disease and/or wheat allergy should completely avoid them—there are just too many alternative grains out there to take such health risks. We can only hope that Purity Foods application for exemption will be met with strong, scientifically-supported opposition.
  13. I am not a fan of any flavored gluten-free instant oatmeal, but Apple Pie Flavored Instant Oatmeal from Bakery On Main is the exception to my rule. There are no artificial flavors and they only use real dried apples and cinnamon which gives it a true homemade comfort taste. This instant oatmeal is also blended with chia seeds, quinoa, and amaranth for additional nutritional value but you would never know if you didn't read the ingredients. Just add hot water, which makes the individual packets perfect for traveling, or to keep on hand as a healthy snack. Visit their site for more info. Note: Articles that appear in the "Gluten-Free Food Reviews" section of this site are paid advertisements. For more information about this see our Advertising Page.
  14. I was pleasantly surprised by the texture, taste and quality of Bakery On Main's Coconut Cashew truebar. I love coconut, and the gluten-free bar had the perfect amount of real, shredded coconut. The rice crisps gave the bar a Rice Crispy treat-like taste and texture that I loved. The bar also contains other healthy ingredients such as chia seeds, which are high in omega 3’s, and it is non GMO and packs 3g (12%) of daily recommended fiber. Bakery On Main really hit a home run when they created this wonderful and healthy gluten-free bar, and it will soon be a fixture in my home’s pantry! For more info visit their site: www.BakeryOnMain.com. Note:Articles thatappearin the "Gluten-Free Food & SpecialtyProduct Companies" section ofthis site are paid advertisements. Formoreinformation about this seeour AdvertisingPage.
  15. I happen to love thin crust pizza. The other day I had the good fortune to get my hands on a 12” Venice Bakery Gluten-Free Pizza Crust, and it looked as if it was made exactly how I like it—uniformly thin throughout the entire crust. I was impressed by how perfectly formed this pizza crust was, and I also like the fact that it was larger than most crusts I’ve tried—it was big enough for my family of four. My family and I prepared the pizza together, and we added our favorite tomato sauce, cheese and gluten-free pizza toppings. We baked it in the oven as advised on the package for about 12-15 minutes at 475F, and the results of our minimal efforts were outstanding! The crust had excellent texture and tasted exactly how I expect great pizza to taste. My non-gluten-free family members (who can be more picky about some of the gluten-free products that I bring home!), absolutely loved this pizza! I would love to do an experiment with with this pizza and serve it to unsuspecting non-celiacs—I am certain that they would not only not detect that it was gluten-free, but would consider it an outstanding pizza crust! Visit their Web site for more info: http://www.venicebakery.com Note:Articles that appearin the "Gluten-Free Food & SpecialtyProduct Companies" section ofthis site are paid advertisements. Formore information about this seeour AdvertisingPage.
  16. I’m always keeping an eye out for nutritional snacks that are convenient for “grab-and-go” moments. I recently came across Bakery On Main's Gluten-free Peanut Butter and Jelly Granola Bars and I have to say that I was pleasantly surprised. These bars are soft and chewy and are made with real peanut butter and dried strawberries so there are no mystery ingredients or artificial flavors, which always gives me extra peace of mind. What I did find surprising is that the bars also contained other nutritional gluten-free grains like quinoa and amaranth but my kids still liked them. Visit their site: www.bakeryonmain.com Note:Articles that appearin the "Gluten-Free Food & SpecialtyProduct Companies" section ofthis site are paid advertisements. Formore information about this seeour AdvertisingPage.
  17. Bakery on Main’s Cinnamon Raisin granola is gluten-free and packed with an amazing 9 grams of fiber per serving—when they use “Fiber Power” on the front of their package they aren’t kidding. They use certified gluten-free oats, which is great for celiacs who include oats in their diet. This gluten-free cereal tastes great—it is not too sweet, nor does it taste too strongly of cinnamon. It is packed with raisins, which I love. On top of this it is dairy, GMO, cholesterol and trans fat-free, and is low in sodium. In summary, it is a great way to start your day! Visit their site: www.bakeryonmain.com Note: Articles that appearin the "Gluten-Free Product Reviews" section of this site are paid advertisements. For more information about this seeour Advertising Page.
  18. Purity Gluten-Free Bread is an amazing product for many reasons. First off it is cultured for 8 hours (you can notice a slight sourdough flavor), so it is easier to digest, and, according to the Julian Bakery “you get more energy out of it than it takes to digest it.” Second, gluten-free Purity Bread has only 2 net carbs, 7 grams of protein, and 8 grams of fiber per slice, and I doubt that there are other gluten-free breads that can make this claim. Third, Purity Bread has zero refined ingredients and is excellent for those with diabetes, celiac disease, candida overgrowth, and hypoglycemia—so it really is in a class of its own. On top of all this the bread tastes fantastic! Find out more at: julianbakery.com/bread-product/purity-bread/. Get $3 off with coupon: 1559 Note: Articles that appear in the "Gluten-Free Product Reviews" section of this site are paid advertisements. For more information about this see our Advertising Page.
  19. When I first opened the package of Squirrel’s Bakery Gluten-Free Coconut and Chocolate Chip Cookie Bars I was surprised by their unique shape: The package contained two bars that are approximately 2.5” x 3” and they are around an inch thick­so they resemble a brownie in size and shape. They aren't kidding when they use the terms “thick & hearty” to describe these cookie bars. In addition to being gluten-free, Squirrel’s Bakery thick & hearty cookie bars are also soy, dairy and nut-free, so they will appeal to those of you who have additional food intolerances or allergies, as well as to those who have celiac disease. The bars are made using quality ingredients like Bob’s Red Mill gluten-free oats, organic brown rice flour and Enjoy Life gluten, soy, dairy & nut free chocolate chips, and they are also a good source of fiber, iron, calcium and protein (the bars do contain eggs). The first thing I noticed when biting into the Squirrel’s Gluten-Free Coconut and Chocolate Chip bar is the large coconut flakes, which tasted wonderful. This taste was enhanced by the wonderful combination of their allergy-friendly chocolate chips, along with their blend of gluten-free flours and oats. The texture was very nice, it was not too moist and not too dry­I’ve never been a fan of overly-soft cookies or bars. The last question that must be answered about this excellent gluten-free “cookie”: Could I get used to eating “cookie bars” instead of regular old cookies? Sure…I really can't imagine anyone who would not enjoy these special treats! They should please the most die hard cookie lovers, and offer a unique take on a traditional treat. Squirrel’s Bakery is a small family owned cookie manufacturing business based in Virginia Beach, Virginia and was founded in 2009. For more information, you can visit their Web site at www.squirrelsbakery.com. Note: Articles that appearin the "Gluten-Free Product Reviews" section ofthis site are paid advertisements. For more information about this seeour Advertising Page.
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