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Found 28 results

  1. Hello! I found a dessert recipe I would like to try for a dinner guest with a Celiac disease. While I am pretty sure that the ingredients called for are all gluten-free, I’m looking for someone to double check just in case I missed something. Any help would be much appreciated! And if it’s forum approved, of course I would share the recipe with anyone who’s interested. Here’s the list: cashews pear nectar agar flakes arrowroot powder maple syrup rolled oats almknd meal brown rice flour coconut flour spelt flour baking powder pistachios Thank you in advance!
  2. Celiac.com 07/25/2017 - Enzymes are playing an increasing part in both the treatment of celiac disease, and in the manufacture of gluten-free baked goods. DSM recently showcased their new rice-based baker's enzyme, Bakezyme, at the annual meeting of Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) in Las Vegas. The product took DSM two years to develop and perfect, and promises to improve the softness and moistness of gluten-free bread. Bakezyme is so good, says DSM, and leaves gluten-free bread so soft and so moist that it can compete with wheat-based breads in texture. Designed to meet an array of manufacturer needs, Bakezyme is available in five different enzyme classes–amylase, protease, xylanase, glucose oxidase and amyloglucosidase. The version with amylase, an anti-staling enzyme, for example, will retain the softness for at least nine days. Fokke Van den Berg, DSM global business manager for baking says that Bakezyme grew out of DSM's efforts to tackle the two biggest consumer complaints about gluten-free bread, the hardness, and the dryness. While most baker's enzymes are derived from wheat, Bakezyme is made of fermentation-derived microorganisms added to rice flour, making it suitable for people with celiac disease and gluten intolerance. Because the enzymes are deactivated during baking, Bakezyme is regarded as a processing aid and thus is not required to be listed as an ingredient. DSM tested Bakezyme on two types of dough, oat and a mixture of potato and rice, with each requiring a slightly different formulation for similar results. Beyond the slight costs of ensuring that Bakezyme is gluten-free, its overall price is on par other enzyme ingredients, partly because such a small amount is needed. One kilo of Bakezyme is enough to produce 10,000 kilos of bread. The company expects most demand to come from the US and UK as well as other European countries, but the gluten-free trend is also spreading to Brazil, Turkey and Morocco, said Van den Berg. Read more at FoodNavigator.com.
  3. I'm a college kid new to the gluten free diet and need some recommendations on good baking kits. I used to just buy brownie and cookie mix but its hard for me to find a good quick fix for parties etc.
  4. Celiac.com 12/09/2016 - Can the high fiber waste from coffee production be used to create an environmentally friendly gluten-free flour? Coffee cherries are the fat, pulpy coating around the famous coffee bean. When coffee is harvested, the cherry is removed and discarded before the beans are processed and roasted. Given that more than 17 billion pounds of coffee beans are harvested, fermented and dried each year, that's a great deal of coffee cherry waste. Too much, in fact, for farmers to merely plow back into their fields, as is commonly done. Formulated by former Starbucks executive Dan Belliveau in 2012, coffee flour is transforms that leftover waste into a high quality flour that not only happens to be free of wheat, rye or barley proteins, it happens to have high levels of natural gluten that makes it ideal for baking. Belliveau's patent-pending process collects the cherries and converts them into a nutrient-dense, gluten-free flour. Coffee flour contains five times more fiber than wholewheat flour, three times the protein of fresh kale, and twice potassium of bananas. The final product does not taste anything like coffee, but has a mild flavor of burnt sugar due to its high sugar content. It is also low in caffeine. Founded to commercialize coffee flour, CF Global Holdings contracted Ecom Ago Industrial Inc and Mercon Coffee Group to collect and process coffee cherries from farmers and millers in Nicaragua, Guatemala, Vietnam, El Salvador, Papua New Guinea, Brazil, Costa Rica and Mexico. The latest yield was about 2 million pounds of dried coffee cherry pulp from the 2015/2016 crop, double the previous harvest yield. The company employs a multistep milling process to grind the cherries into flour of sufficient quality for commercial use. The process can be taken further to produce a flour with the consistency of icing sugar consistency. Carole Widmayer, VP of marketing told Bakeryandsnacks.com that "Coffee flour can [already] be found in muffins, cookies and brownies at Sprouts, brownies and cookies in cafes at Google and HSBC operated by Compass, as well as in Seattle Chocolate chocolate bars and Earnest Eats energize cereals. So, will coffee flour be the next big gluten-free, environmentally friendly big thing? It looks to be well on its way. Read more at bakeryandsnacks.com.
  5. George Macdonald

    Puberty

    Hi! My name is George. I am 13 years of age and I am struggling with a problem. I was diagnosed with celiac about 6 months ago after having stomachs and short stature. I love this new diet now that I am starting to develop muscles. The good things end there. I hate seeing all my friends eat sandwiches, cake, cookies, pizza etc. I also have been dealing with delayed puberty. Is this linked with celiac? Should I tell my parents? Should I see an endocrinologist? Please help me. -George P.S. An adult didn't write this I am just very educated.
  6. Celiac.com 01/20/2016 - The East Lansing woman's pitch for Sweet Encounter won her $11,000 dollars during the Hatching finale business pitch competition at the University Club of Michigan State University. Frazier's motivation for participating in the pitch was simple. Her two children suffer from seven different food allergies between them. "There's a lack of safe food options in Lansing. I made all my food from scratch so I figured other moms could benefit from this,"said Frazier, 38. Thompson's winnings include the $10,000 grand prize from the juried competition, which pitted 12 monthly Hatching winners against each other, along with the crowd favorite award worth $1,000 and a free one-year membership to the University Club. Frazier has now won a total of $22,000 from business pitch competitions including the Hatching and the InnovateHER Challenge, a competition for women entrepreneurs, both hosted by the Lansing Economic Area Partnership. When asked about her efforts, Frazier said, "I make gluten-free food taste delicious." Frazier wowed the panel judges during her three-minute presentation, pointing out similarities between her vision and entrepreneurs like Martha Stewart and Oprah Winfrey, and touted her ability to generate viable spinoffs from her gluten-free ideas, including potential for cookware, a recipe book, a TV show and magazines, all of which Frazier dubbed the "Nikki Effect." Stay tuned for progress on Nikki Thompson Frazier's efforts to parlay her baking excellence into entrepreneurial opportunity.
  7. Celiac.com 10/01/2015 - Nutrilac protein from Arla Food Ingredients (AFI) offers manufacturers a way to make gluten-free products that are indistinguishable from products made with conventional flour, says John Kjaer, global sales manager for bakery at AFI. Kjaer points out that the gluten-free trend is huge right now, will only be sustainable if "bakery companies…can make gluten-free bread and cakes that are virtually indistinguishable from their conventional equivalents." According to AFI, Nutrilac can be incorporated into standard gluten-free baked goods, and offers gluten-free bakers a similar baking quality to wheat flour, producing an elastic dough that can be handled like standard wheat flour dough. This eliminates the problem of dry, crumbly gluten-free baked goods. Nutrilac uses completely natural milk proteins, which have a neutral, well-rounded milky taste, with no impact on overall product flavor. Products made with Nutrilac do not require new machinery or a change in standard manufacturing procedures, making it easier for companies to enter the gluten-free market, AFI said. AFI will be showcasing Nutrilac at IBA in Munich from the 12-17 September 2015.
  8. Being Celiac, I have taught myself how to bake using gluten free ingredients and i want to share my recipes with as many as i can so that people can realise it's not all bad and we can eat yummy things too! I'm also a small/new YouTuber and i have made a gluten free halloween cupcake recipe video, for any one that may want to check it out here's the link https://youtu.be/mTrJMB2ZYXg I'd really appreciate any feedback! Thank you Georgia x
  9. Celiac.com 11/01/2010 - American Key Food Products (AKFP) has announced a patent application for the production process for a gluten-free cassava flour. The company also announced that it has begun initial production of this new gluten-free flour at its manufacturing facility in Brazil. Gluten is the protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. Gluten provides the structural elasticity in kneaded dough products, permits leavening, and supports the crumb structure and chewy texture of traditional baked goods. In the last few years, a number of manufacturers have produced gluten-free flour and starch products for gluten-free baking. However, creating baked goods without gluten is challenging, and the resulting baked goods can often be dry, crumbly, or gummy products. Cassava, or tapioca flour, has been one of the more promising ingredients for gluten-free baking. However, most traditional cassava flours have a coarse texture, similar to corn meal. According to AKFP technical sales director Carter Foss, the company has spent more than a year developing the flour to have baking characteristics that closely mimic wheat flour in structure, texture and taste. The result of the AKFP process, which uses the complete root, is a fine, soft flour that contains both protein and fiber. The patent application covers various aspects of the manufacturing process, including particular milling and drying procedures, as well as the resulting flour itself. “During the processing of it, we have to get the physical characteristics made correctly or the flour fails. It over-bakes and turns to dust,” Foss said. Foss says that AKFP cassava flour can replace combinations of flours, starches and hydrocolloids in gluten-free baked goods, allowing for a simpler ingredient statement. After the pilot runs are completed at its new Brazilian facility, AKFP intends to have continuous production on line by the beginning of 2011. Source: http://www.foodnavigator-usa.com/Financial-Industry/AKFP-applies-for-patent-for-gluten-free-cassava-flour
  10. I recently found out I have a gluten sensitivity. I have been gluten-free for a month. I made PB cookies for my husband, and was very careful about not inhaling the flour. Yet, before I even got the first batch of cookies in the oven I was feeling weird. Now I have all the symptoms as if I had actually ate the cookies. This is normal? Am I really THAT sensitive to flour??
  11. i am recently diagnosed and have had a really hard time find baking mixes that taste good. a friend shared bag of mix she got after reading a review from celiac.org - the mix is called versameal genesis 1 baking blend. It made a real difference in my life. It seems like something that's really different - it tastes like regular whole grain really amazing. just wondering if anyone else has tried this - it really seems like something new and different - this is the review i was talking about http://www.celiac.com/articles/23702/1/VersaMeal-Whole-Grain-Gluten-Free-Baking-Blend/Page1.html would love to know if anyone else here has tried it - i have the baking blend and just ordered the bread blend - it made a real difference for me so just wanted to pass it along
  12. Celiac.com Sponsor: Review

    VersaMeal Whole Grain Gluten-Free Baking Blend

    If you're looking for a quality product that can make several different kinds of baked goods including muffins, pancakes, waffles, sweet bread, and brownies you definitely need to get VersaMeal's Whole Grain Gluten-Free Baking Blend. This new product comes in a two pound bag and it does not contain starches, gums or cellulose that are used in most other conventional mixes. I tried the blueberry muffin recipe and they came out moist with a golden crust topping that was delicious! These muffins are great for breakfast or a midnight snack or any time in between. For more information visit: www.versameal.org
  13. Hello, everyone my name is Sophie and this is the first time in posting anything as I only found this amazing and wonderful site today. I have a problem. I have loved baking ever since I was a children and it always brings me joy, But lately ever since I have had to turn to free from things such as gluten-free Flour, xanthan gum, Soy Milk etc. etc. I have found my baking has just been failing and not working half the time. Either the bake with fall flat, not rise, won't cook right. there's always something that goes wrong. When I was doing normal cooking without any allergies It was all going fine, but now not so much Does anyone have any tips of what might be going wrong or any tips for celiac, nut free, dairy free baking. Thanks SophieGoodswin xx
  14. Is excessive consumption of gluten-containing food a risk factor for celiac? I was wondering whether it worked on a similar principal to too much alcohol and alcoholism or sun exposure and skin cancer. I never had any of the symptoms or signs of celiac that have been documented when I was in grade school. A few years prior to being diagnosed I loved my bread and did a lot of home baking with organic unbleached flour and even added vital wheat gluten to breads and cakes. Neighbours always said that our baked items were the best they'd ever come across. This video by Joseph Murray MD at Mayo Clinic seems to sum it up well. Do you think there's a connection???
  15. Hi guys! I love muffins with fresh fruit in them but I'm having trouble with the batter surrounding certain fruits not cooking. For instance I made bran flax muffins with blueberries, cranberries & diced mango. There were little pockets of raw dough surrounding the mango (but not the berries). For the next batch I tried freezing the mango before adding to the batter but that made it worse. I really want to make some peach muffins but I don't want to go through all that time, energy & money only to have to throw them out! Thanks much!!
  16. Ugh! Another intolerance identified! This time it is xanthan gum. I have have used xantham gum for years in baking for my gluten-free husband. Now that I have been diagnosed, my own consumption rate of it has increased (as I heal, I've been feeling better and have been inspired to bake). I confess that I eat a lot. When cookies come out of the oven, I've been known to eat at least 10 of them within an hour! I am a pig, even though I know moderation is best! So, knowing that I won't change that lifelong behavior (and don't want to), I switched to guar gum and I have been fine. Then I made tacos two weeks ago and used gluten-free taco sauce. I got my stabbing stomach pains within a few minutes so I ran back into the kitchen and read the taco sauce label. Yep, it contained xanthan gum! (Oh, my gluten-free husband does not even have any issues, so I know that I'm not getting "glutened".) Does anyone else have issues with xanthan gum? This new intolerance really puts a damper on purchasing processes gluten-free foods which are handy to consume when you are traveling!
  17. Hiya! I'm creating a bran muffin recipe and the first batch turned out pretty darn good. I'd like to try to give them a little more of a dark whole wheat/wheat bran flavor...any suggestions please? One bread recipe I found that said it had a whole-wheat taste had a little bit of cocoa powder in it. Does anyone know if that really gives more wheat-like flavor? I'd never have thought to do that and don't want to ruin a whole batch of muffins if it's not true! Here's my recipe: Berry Bran Muffins 350g whole grain flour mix (245g whole grains: 90g oat bran, 90g buckwheat, 40g sorghum, 25g almond meal + 105g starch: 50g potato, 40g tapioca, 15g cornstarch) 2 Tbsp flax seeds, finely ground 1/2 tsp baking soda 1/4 tsp baking powder 85g coconut palm sugar 1 tsp sea salt 2 extra large eggs 300 grams buttermilk 1/2 tsp apple cider vinegar 100 grams butter, melted 1/2 tsp orange zest 2 Tbsp molasses 3/4 cup blueberries 3/4 cup dried cranberries, rehydrated Thanks much!!
  18. Correctly measure your flour. When measuring flour, don’t scoop from the bag with your measuring cup. This compresses the flour. Use a spoon to scoop flour into the measuring cup and level off with a knife. This will ensure that your flour is measured properly. Bring your ingredients to room temperature before mixing. It is particularly important for yeast recipes to bring all of your ingredients, such as eggs, to room temperature before adding them together to make bread. Yeast needs warmth to grow and if your ingredients are too cold, it may prevent full yeast growth. Make sure your loaf of bread is actually fully cooked. It is very important not to take your bread out of the oven before it is fully cooked. If the bread has a rubbery layer at the bottom, this usually means it was not fully cooked. The best way to tell if the bread is done is to take a baking thermometer and insert it all the way into the bottom of the loaf. The temperature should be approximately 210 F when it is done. Your bread will keep its shape better overcooked than undercooked, so if in doubt, keep it in the oven a bit longer! My recipes have plenty of moisture, so you shouldn’t worry too much about the bread drying out. If baking by oven method, use metal pans. I have found that glass bread pans do not work as well as metal pans in fully cooking a loaf of bread. Metal pans do not have to be fancy or expensive, and you can often even find them in your local grocery store. Rising issues. A great method for letting your yeast breads rise before baking is to turn on your oven to 200F, then turn it off when it has reached temperature. Put your un-raised bread into the warmed oven with an oiled piece of wax paper on top and let it rise according to directions. Once raised, removed the wax paper and bake according to directions. How to prevent your bread from sinking. When your bread is done cooking, turn off the oven and open the door so that the bread can cool slowly. Taking the bread out of a hot oven and quickly transferring it to a cool counter can sometimes cause the loaf to sink in. If it still sinks, it may have too much moisture in it to support itself fully. It should still taste great, but if you have your heart set on a nice crowned loaf, next time try cutting back on the liquid a bit in that recipe or adding ¼ cup of flaxseed meal to help support the bread's structure and enhance its nutritional value, all in one! Altitude and even the day's weather can affect sometimes picky yeast recipes. How to make a multi-grain loaf of bread. To make a more “whole grain” bread, take a basic recipe (for example, Jules’ Sandwich Bread recipe). In place of the 2 cups of Jules Gluten Free All Purpose flour, add only 1 ¾ cups. Replace the final ¼ cup with flax seed meal, buckwheat flour, gluten-free oat flour, brown rice flour, or teff flour. These flours will add more whole grain flavor and additional fiber. You can also add seeds (flax seeds, sesame seeds, etc.) to add crunch and fiber. With this amount of different flours, you do not need to adjust the recipe at all.
  19. To me, the absolute worst thing about most gluten free breads is the pathetically small loaf size you get for the money or effort. There are a few gems out there like Tom Van Deman's recipe, but what about store-bought mixes? Can anyone recommend a mix that will give me a gloriously giant loaf of bread? Size is my top priority, but great taste is a nice bonus, too. :-)
  20. My husband has recently been diagnosed with a gluten intolerance, subsequently I am now making our own breads etc. The issue im having is that, despite following all the recipes exactly, the bread all have a cake like quality, and not like bread at all. Does anyone have any tips? I know that the bread will never be the same as store bought wheat bread, but any tips are most welcome.
  21. So today I had a breakthrough, after adapting the ciabatta recipe I uploaded yesterday. This is better and so similar to real bread! I'd say it's a good bread, not 'good, for gluten free'. As always, watch out for cross-cotamination in the manufacture of your ingredients. Please give me your suggestions/feedback and feel free to ask questions. It's quite yellow in colour from the corn, but otherwise it's not too unusual looking! The crumb is holey and the bread is crusty with a very moist interior. Makes 2 Baguettes 170g Cornmeal 175g Potato Starch 155g Rice Flour 6g Psyllium Husk 500ml Warm Water 2T EV Olive Oil 15g Salt 2t Yeast Mix together all the dry ingredients except the psyllium. Mix the psyllium and oil with the water and leave to stand for 10 mins. Mix the water with the flour until completely incorperated. Transfer the dough to a non-stick container (or oiled bowl) and cover. Leav to rise until at tripled (took me about 2 hrs). Shape into two rectangles on a baking tray covered in cornmeal. Preheat the oven to max (mine is a fan oven and it was 250c). Prove the loaves for about 30 mins while the oven heats up. When proved, roll the rectangles into baguettes, with the seam underneath. Sprinkle with cornmeal, slash and bake for 20 mins. It is important to cool the bread fully before cutting into it.
  22. Hello. I'm new here so please be nice haha. I just came up with a new ciabatta recipe so I thought it might be useful to some people here. It's pretty quick for a ciabatta, in that there is no over night prove. It is both gluten free and vegan. Please let me know what you think. As always, it's important with many of these ingredients to double check when it comes to cross-contamination. I'm in the UK so not sure what the availability of these is like elsewhere. I originally tried to post a link to the baking website I posted this on but wasn't allowed. So don't worry if you see the recipe elsewhere, it is me! Photos: The crumb looks a bit tighter and more cake-y here than it really was. In most places I cut through there were rather large holes, as you'd expect from ciabatta. Ingredients 150 g Cornmeal 175 g Potato Starch 125 g Sorghum Flour 50 g Rice Flour 15 g salt 2 t Yeast (Instant) 10 g Psyllium Husk (This can be obtained from Asian supermarkets or online. It's a coeliac-friendly natural gluten alternative.) 500 ml Warm Water Instructions Mix together all the dry ingredients except the psyllium. Mix the psyllium with the water and leave to stand for 10 mins. Mix the water with the flour until completely incorperated. Transfer the dough to a non-stick container (or oiled bowl) and cover. Leav to rise until at least doubled (about 2 hours). Shape into two loaves on a baking tray covered in cornmeal. Preheat the oven to max (mine is a fan oven and it was 250c). Prove the loaves for about 30 mins while the oven heats up. Sprinkle with cornmeal, slash and bake for 20 mins.
  23. Hi! Boy am I relieved to have found this forum. I need help! I just started playing with baking totally from scratch (no mixes) and decided to attempt cobbler topping. Even though I thought I did everything according to the recipe and ratio instructions online - from reputable sources like gluten-free Goddess - it did not come out at all like I'd hoped. What I was picturing was crisp/crumbly on the outside and soft/tender in the middle. It came out kind of dense and very rubbery/gummy. We all know how time consuming and expensive these experiments are and I'm also dealing with severe chronic Lyme so I can't just whip up another batch. Any help would be really appreciated! I haven't been able to bake in a long time and really missed it. Then I discovered that if I break recipes into segments, over a few days, and do a lot of the work from bed I can do a project once in awhile! It's such a joy for me. But each project is such a production I can't do more than one every month or 2. So I really want to maximize my efforts and get a recipe as good as I can before I put all that precious energy in. Sorry for the long story, just wanted you to understand my world a little :-) So here's what happened (if anyone's still reading ;-))... I found gluten-free Goddess' cobbler recipe and was going to basically follow that, using the flours & starches I had on hand. There's also an article on her blog that describes how to make your own flour blend, what ratios to use, etc. She says 40% whole grain and 60% starches and gives a list of what falls into which category. But, her cobbler recipe did not match this ratio so I wasn't sure which to follow! I ended up going by the 40-60 rule. I also decided to bake the topping separately from the fruit because I've had trouble in the past with it getting soggy after a couple days. Topping recipe I created following the "rule": 40% sorghum and almond meal 60% tapioca starch and cornstarch So for flour mix, used: 1/2 c sorghum & 3 Tbl almond and 1 c tapioca & 2 Tbl cornstarch 1/2 c coconut palm sugar 1/2 tsp salt 1 tsp xanthan gum 1 3/4 tsp baking powder 1/3 tsp baking soda 1/2 c butter, cubed 1 egg Splash vanilla 1 c milk I mixed dry ingredients together, cut in butter using food processor. Separately whipped egg, added vanilla and milk. Stirred all together til just combined. Batter was wetter than expected, sort of between biscuit dough & pancake batter. Poured into 9x13 and baked at 350 til done. Now here's her original recipe (which doesn't follow 40-60 rule): 1 cup sorghum flour or brown rice flour 1/2 cup almond meal 1/2 cup tapioca starch 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt 2 teaspoons baking powder 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 1 1/2 teaspoons xanthan gum 1/2 cup organic cane sugar 1/2 teaspoon bourbon vanilla extract 6 tablespoons of light olive oil or melted vegan butter spread 1 egg replacer (I used Ener-G Egg Replacer) 1 1/4 to 1 1/2 cups unsweetened So Delicious Coconut Milk, or hemp, almond, or rice milk Thanks so much for your help!! I really appreciate any and all input :-D
  24. Does anyone have a favorite gluten-free vegan cookbook? I have the Gluten-Free Vegan and Gluten-Free Vegan Comfort Foods cookbook. But, I'm hoping to find some more cookbooks worth having and possibly a baking cookbook with good bread recipes that gluten-free and vegan! Any suggestions?
  25. Celiac.com 01/06/2012 - The same ultrasound technology that helps doctors and expectant parents to view a developing baby might soon literally mean a better gluten-free bun in the oven. That's because engineers researching how ultrasound could be used to improve industrial baking have received a UK government grant of £500,000 (about $725,000 U.S. dollars) to commercialize their technology. The grant from the Technology Strategy Board will support the 25-month project,which will be led by food ingredient manufacturer Macphie of Glenbervie and involve Piezo Composite Transducers, Mono Bakery Equipment and Fosters Bakery. The engineers, based at Heriot-Watt University, say their technique reduces processing time and improves energy usage, reduces wastage and improves the texture of gluten-free products. They declined to give details about the exact nature of their technology, and how it worked. However, they did say that ultrasonic waves helped baking dough to regulate its energy and mass balance, which prevents air pockets from forming and helped protect the structure of the dough against collapse. Research leader Dr Carmen Torres-Sánchez said that the technology would allow bakers to create products that met current demand for specific ingredients, but which would be much more aesthetically or texturally attractive. For example, she said, ‘[t]here is a lot of pressure on bakers to reduce salt content and that can affect production, causing an imbalance in osmotic pressure so that the dough becomes very sticky…without gluten, products can collapse and look bad. We can use this technology to tailor the texture of products.’ The lab has researched and developed the technique through several feasibility studies. It is based on methods usually used to control the porosity of industrial materials such as foaming polymer. ‘The big question now is how to scale up the technology,’ said Torres-Sánchez. ‘We’ve been doing semi-continuous batches; now we need to use it continuously, producing up to 1,000 loaves in 30 minutes.’ The team also needs to further examine whether the technique can save energy proportionally as it is scaled up. Torres-Sánchez hopes the project will give rise to ovens and other bakery equipment with built-in ultrasonic technology that can easily be controlled as products are baked. Source: http://www.theengineer.co.uk/production-engineering/news/ultrasound-could-improve-the-efficiency-of-industrial-baking/1010813.article