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Found 14 results

  1. hi all! i was wondering if there were any super low gi grains like barley (which has a gi of 28 or something). I need to find something because i have problems with blood sugar, but obviously cant have barley with celiac. I know that there are vegetables with a low gi but i need something with comparable calories (~350/cup) and id have to eat a 5 kg of carrots to get that lol! any ideas?
  2. I have had lupus fibromyalgia ibs or spastic colon since 1998. Now i had allergy testing labs on blood. Im allergic to gluten, almonds, oats, barley, cadida yeast, aspiragillys(molds), broccoli, cabbage, clams goats milk, kidney pinto navy and soybeans, pork, sesame, spinach and canola oil. I don't know what to eat now. I've always eaten say at olive garden or anything and had terrible stomach pains like labor. Then run to the bathroom. Or constipation i cant go for a week or so. I tried spark vitamin drink had gluten, soy powder allergic. Health bars larabars gluten. My weight can be 129 one week 120 next or go to 104 fast. Not sure what to do now. How can regain my life back? Could i have celiac not ibs? I have 3 other auto immune system diseases. Any food resources would be great and vitamins with no soy or gluten. Plus beverages. Ive had hives a month now from my almond butter gluten and vitamin drinks lol steroids and epi pen. Oh and high cholesterol. So everything i ate to lower that im allergic to. Plus a list of secondary allergy foods a mile long.
  3. Hi I've got a severe allergy to Barley and cannot eat anything that contains it i live in Spain and find it very difficult to check all the ingredients breakfast cereals are the most difficult as everyone I found always contains barley if I consume anything with barley even a minute amount from a few minutes to hours later I get an uncontrollable cough and severe breathing problems I was misdiagnosed with asthma due to the symptoms but after much research I now know barley is the culprit i would like to know if anyone has the same illness or symptoms thank you
  4. Celiac.com 07/15/2016 - Germans are particular about their beer. Since the 14th century, they have had a beer purity law, called Reinheitsgebot. That law says that beer must be made with wheat or barley, if it is to be called beer. That means that many gluten-free beers brewed without wheat or barley cannot be considered beer in Germany. Now, German brewers are using special "ultra-low" gluten Australian barley to brew the first gluten-free beer that conforms to the strict requirements of the law. The barley is called "Kebari" barley, and was developed by Csiro, an Australian government scientific research agency, which used conventional breeding to reduce the gluten levels to 10,000 times less than regular barley, which more than meets the World Health Organisation's recommendation for calling a grain gluten-free. German brewer Radeberger is using Kebari barley to brew a beer named Pionier, which is the first such beer to conform to the German beer purity law, Reinheitsgebot. Pionier beer is currently only available in Germany, where it can be legally labeled gluten-free. However, while Pionier has gluten levels well below the 20 parts per million levels used by the World Health Organization to classify products as gluten-free, products made with Kebari barley still cannot claim to be "gluten-free" in the United States, Australia or New Zealand under current labeling standards. The first gluten-free beer to meet German purity laws will be very big news among gluten-free beer lovers. Read more at: Foodnavigator-asia.com.
  5. Hello everyone. Desperate for answers! 6 years ago I started with two end expulsion when I ate wheat, it started with spaghetti. Then shortly after that, 2 months maybe, barley had the same effect. A few months after that rye followed then spelt. Now I can't eat oatmeal doesn't matter if it's gluten free, I end up with cramps and pain. So I just avoid. Went to dr - he tested me (blood test) for celiac whilst I had been gluten free for over a year. Obviously it was negative. I'm also lactose intolerant. Fast forward to two years ago,4 years of gluten free, tried the gluten challenge to have a blood test done again. 6 weeks one slice of bread a day, it was horrific! I ended up with blisters on my bot and elbows. My elbows looked like DH - blood Negative. So my question is, I got glutened four weeks ago, I had blisters on my thighs and fingers this time. Sides of my fingers, pin prick type blisters. I was as sick as a dog, both ends. I had a stool sample done and it revealed lots of fat globules which explains my floating waste but no bacteria/parasites. I have hypothyroid, secondary adrenal insuffiency all well managed. No hashis. Otherwise ok. Other than the horrendous brain fog since the gluten incident. I had high IgA in my saliva but low in blood. Should I opt for biopsy? Apparently I'm not allergic which is good, as I have multiple allergies. appreciate any kind of advice you can offer! thank u!
  6. Celiac.com 04/29/2016 - Efforts to develop gluten-free version of traditional grains like wheat have been underway for some time, with limited success. Now, scientists in Australia say they've developed the world's first World Health Organization-approved "gluten-free" barley. Since barley is a key ingredient in traditional beers, you might imagine that the beer viewing world would be keenly interested in such a development, and you would be right. Developed by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), the product, called Kebari barley, has already drawn interest from a number of commercial breweries. One German brewery, Radeberger, has already ordered 70 tons of the product. Kebari is not genetically modified. Instead, it is the end product of "cross-breeding low gluten barley varieties," CSIRO told Reuters. While Kebari is not 100 percent gluten-free, it is bred to contain "10,000 times less gluten than traditional strains, or about 5 parts of gluten per million, well below the World Health Organization's (WHO) 20 parts per million for classification as a gluten-free grain," according to Reuters. With gluten-free foods and beverages being of the world's fastest growing consumer trends, gluten-free barley could prove to be a very popular ingredient for making celiac-safe beers in the traditional European style. "A true gluten-free barley variety is a true game changer; there is going to be a massive market for the product," Phin Ziebell, an agribusiness economist at National Australia Bank, told Reuters.
  7. FDA proposed rule on gluten-free labeling of fermented or hydrolyzed foods: If you haven’t already, please take the time to comment on the rule. The comment period closes February 16. But this is truly a CALL TO ACTION. Your input is needed. You have a voice, you are an advocate for the gluten-free community. Now is the time to stand up and be heard. Your voice, your words, can help all of us stay safe when purchasing food labeled gluten-free. Johnna’s Kitchen posted a sample letter you may find helpful http://injohnnaskitchen.com/2016/01/call-to-action-your-input-is-requested-by-the-fda-on-gluten-free-issues/ It takes almost no time at all to copy & paste Johnna's letter into the FDA comment site & it will help us all.
  8. Celiac.com 06/09/2015 - The Germans are picky about their beer. They're picky about what goes into their beer. They're picky about what's even allowed to be called beer. They have been since 1487, when Albert IV, Duke of Bavaria enacted the Reinheitsgebot, which means literally "purity order," but if often called the "German Beer Purity Law" in English. The Reinheitsgebot specified that the only ingredients that could be used in the production of beer were water, barley and hops. According to that standard, many gluten-free beers on the market today could not be sold as beer in Germany. They would be some kind of malt beverage. The law has changed over the years, and now permits wheat, for example, but beers brewed in Germany must still meet stringent regulations, including on ingredients. But now the Germans have a plan to brew a gluten-free beer from special gluten-free barley grown in Tasmania. That means gluten-free beer drinkers in Germany will be able to enjoy a new gluten-free beer made with real barley. The Commonwealth scientific and industrial research organization (CSIRO) and Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) have asked TAP Agrico to grow 70 hectares of their special barley variety in Tasmania for a German brewery. Managing director of TAP Agrico, David Skipper said the gluten-free barley is a niche-grain ideally suited to Tasmania's cropping zone. Mr Skipper said the buyer was looking for between 200 and 300 tons this year, but he expected that to rise next year. No word yet on the specific brewery that will be using the gluten-free barley. Stay tuned to leaner more about this unique approach to brewing gluten-free beers. Read more at ABC News.
  9. Hi guys, my girlfriend is Coeliac so I've joined this site to help to better understand her condition and find ways to simply make her diet more enjoyable. First post so please be kind. My question is about 'Gluten Free' Beer and Ale, from what I gather there is some contention about these beers, I believe Estrella Daura (which she does drink and doesn't react too) to be made without wheat/barley so is considered safer than other Beers/ales which are made with 'de-glutenized' barley (like Daas, Greens and Omission). One of the things she misses most is Ale (which you can only seem to get made with 'de-glutenized barley' so it would be great to get some of these ales. I really just wanted to hear about some of your experiences and to see if anyone had any recommendation or advice for me? Or if anyone knows of a safe gluten-free Ale which isn't made using this process? Many Thanks, Ricky
  10. I thought I was doing a good things by getting on liquid vitamins. I thought I could trust the label that said "gluten free" from nature's plus. I thought I could email them now and ask questions but their email page mysteriously doesn't work. The international email looks like goes through to them but who knows who is going to answer that. My symptoms: Heat strain, palpitation, lethargy, pain down arms Nerve pain, numbness, tingling Cold hands and feet hot and cold flushes blue colored skin, dry ashy look dizziness, nausea, eye pressure in the left eye headaches wry neck, muscle spasms, muscle pain, ataxia like nothing I've experienced before Mood swings, depression, nightmares, daymares hay fever and pet allergies increased substantially indigestion, pain while going to the bathroom, bloating, swelling I remember having all this before I knew I was a celiac. That was way back in highschool. I was wondering where the hell all this came out of, checking all my sources and looking at everything with suspicion....then this morning after 3 months of taking the liquid vitamins by Nature'sPlus, I noticed on the bottle in fine print under "Source 70 Whole Food Complex" there it was. Barely Grass is NOT gluten free when allowed to begin to seed or to fully seed, then harvested and put into the vitamins. NOT GLUTEN FREE!!! This have put me back months in my gluten free diet and I've BEEN GLUTEN FREE FOR YEARS!!! SINCE 2004!!! Not cool people. Not cool.
  11. Hi gang. I'm so angry I could scream...I accidentally glutened my daughter with a cup of Celestial Seasonings Sugar Cookie Sleigh Ride tea. I have been at this for a very long time, reading labels diligently, teaching my child as she has grown up to be her own best advocate, and we have literally had not one single glutening issue in more years than I can remember. Until now. I recently purchased several boxes of tea by different companies, because it is cold out and we all wanted something warm to drink. I do check labels diligently, a hard lesson learned for all Celiacs as we know, but I swear, it never even occurred to me that an herbal tea made by a reputable company would add gluten to the mix, so I did not read the ingredients when I purchased this item. Big mistake. The tea is called Sugar Cookie Sleigh Ride, so that should have been my first clue to check the ingredients, but it also boasts itself to be an herbal tea, which threw me off. I am embarrassed to say I did check the side label for nutrition content, but I was checking only for carb count, as we only eat sugar free now. I did not read the ingredient list until last night, and boy am I miffed! I made myself a cup of the tea last night and it just tasted way too good to not have something questionable in it, like artificial flavoring or corn syrup solids (after not eating sugar or any variation of it for it so long my palette is highly sensitive to sweet tastes). When I looked at the ingredients it said it contains ROASTED BARLEY. Roasted barley! And it did not list any allergens whatsoever! Ugh... So I inspected the entire packaging as carefully as I could and nowhere on the front of the packaging did it say it was not a gluten free food, however it did say--way on the bottom of one side where it is very easily overlooked--that it "Contains Gluten". Well, Dear Celestial Seasonings, you just glutened my kid. She only drank one cup of the Sugar Cookie tea 4 days ago, and tells me she didn't notice any symptoms, but I can tell you that for the last several days she looked different to me--peaked, pale, circles under the eyes, etc. I told my husband that it wouldn't surprise me in the least if she had a stuffy nose for the next few days--a sure sign of glutening for her. The only good news is that she did not get the resulting abdominal pain and symptoms of a high dose of gluten. But on the other hand, she seems to think that because it didn't affect her that way she can get away with occasional gluten. Wrong! I feel like we just lost years and years of hyper-vigilant avoidance and education. So there it is, a hard lesson re-learned--always, ALWAYS check labels. Sigh.
  12. The following was written by Donald D. Kasarda who is a research chemist in the Crop Improvement and Utilization Research Unit of the United States Department of Agriculture. If you have any questions or comments regarding the piece, you can address them to Don at: kasarda@pw.usda.gov. The connection with wheat (and rye and barley) wasnt recognized until the 1950s - (a)nd it wasnt until the 1960s that intestinal biopsies began to become commonly used in the diagnosis of celiac disease. With regard to the harmfulness of barley malt, the situation is complicated. I will give you my best shot with the qualification that the ideal experiments have not been done and a definitive statement is not possible at this time. Because barley malt is made from barley grain that has been germinated it is reasonably certain to be less toxic than barley itself. The hordein proteins and starch in the endosperm of barley grains, like the equivalent gluten proteins and starch in wheat, are there for storage purposes. In a sense, they provide food for the new plant upon germination. In order to use the hordein proteins, the grain releases and generates enzymes upon germination that break down the storage proteins into their constituent amino acids. The problem is that the process is not complete during a short germination, so some peptides (short pieces of the proteins) remain intact in malted barley. There is experimental evidence for this. The resulting mix of peptides is highly complex. We know from work described in the scientific literature that relatively small polypeptide chains can still retain activity in celiac disease and we know something about a few sequences that seem to be harmful. But we probably dont know all the sequences that are harmful and we havent put our fingers on the common theme that gives rise to the activity in celiac disease. So the question arises as to whether or not the remaining sequences in malted barley are harmful. The possibilities that come to my mind are: There are sufficient remaining harmful peptides (with sizes including approximately 12 or more amino acid residues) to give a significant activity in celiac disease to barley malt (remember though that barley malt is usually a minor component of most foods in which it is used and processing might decrease the amount of harmful peptides in a malt product); There are traces of these peptides, but they are sufficiently minimal so as to cause no discernible harm; or The key harmful amino acid sequences are completely destroyed by the enzymes during germination (I can speculate that there might be an important enzyme, very active, in germination that clips a key bond in active sequences, thus reducing the concentration of those active sequences to almost nil while still allowing non-harmful peptides to exist; no evidence exists for this speculation, but it could be used as a working hypothesis for experimentation). There is no completely solid evidence for or against there being a threshold of gluten consumption below which no harm, or at least no lasting harm, occurs and above which definite harm occurs (but see my previous post to the list on starch/malt question). This is a difficult area to study where zero consumption is being approached and the arguments that come up are at least similar to those that have arisen in regard to the question of whether or not there is a minimal level of radiation exposure below which no harm is caused, but above which there is harm that increases with dosage. Accordingly, celiac patients must choose arbitrarily the path they feel comfortable with. Here are some references that deal with the question of peptide toxicity. It is not a simple situation: Shewry, P. R., Tatham, A. S., Kasarda, D. D. Cereal proteins and coeliac disease. In Coeliac Disease, Ed. M. N. Marsh. Blackwell Scientific, London 1992;pp. 305-348. Kasarda, D. D. Toxic cereal grains in coeliac disease. In: Gastrointestinal Immunology and Gluten Sensitive Disease: Proc. 6th International Symp. On Coeliac Disease, C. Feighery and C. OFarrelly, eds., Oak Tree Press, Dublin 1994;pp. 203-220. Wieser, H., Belitz, H.-D., Idar, D., Ashkenazi, A. Coeliac activity of the gliadin peptides CT-1 and CT-2. Zeitschrift fur Lebensmittel-Untersuchung und-Forschung 1986;182:115-117. De Ritis, G., Auricchio, S., Jones, H. W., Lew, E. J.-L., Bernardin, J. E., Kasarda, D. D. In vitro (organ culture) studies of the toxicity of specific A-gliadin peptides in celiac disease Gastroenterology 1988;94:41-49. Fluge, 0, K. Sletten, G. Fluge, Aksnes, L., S. Elsayed. In vitro toxicity of purified gluten peptides tested by organ culture. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition 1994;18:186-192. Sturgess, R., Day, P., Ellis, H. J., Lundin, K. A., Gjertsen, H. A, Kontakou, M., Ciclitira, P. J. Wheat peptide challenge in coeliac disease. Lancet 1994;343:758-761. Marsh, M. N., Morgan, S., Ensari, A., Wardle, T., Lobley, R., Mills, C., Auricchio, S. In vivo activity of peptides 31-43, 44-55, 56-68 of a-gliadin in gluten sensitive enteropathy (GSE). Supplement to Gastroenterology 1995;108:A871.
  13. Celiac.com 06/30/2010 - Presently, the only proven treatment for celiac disease is a lifelong gluten-free diet. As part of a gluten-free diet, people with celiac disease are encouraged to avoid consuming foods containing rye, along with avoiding wheat and barley. However, there is surprisingly little evidence to document the adverse effects of rye in cases of celiac disease. To address this deficiency, a team of clinicians set out to determine conclusively whether rye should be excluded from the celiac diet. The team included S. M. Stenman, K. Lindfors, J. I. Venäläinen, A. Hautala, P. T. Männistö, J. A. Garcia-Horsman, A. Kaukovirta-Norja, S. Auriola, T. Mauriala, M. Mäki, and K. Kaukinen They are affiliated variously with the Department of Pediatrics, and the Pediatric Research Center of the Medical School University of Tampere, the Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery at Tampere University Hospital, the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, the Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry at the University of Kuopio, the Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, the Division of Pharmaceutical Chemistry at the University of Helsinki, and Technical Research Centre of Finland. The goal of the team was to determine whether rye secalin triggers toxic reactions in vitro in intestinal epithelial cell models to the same degree as wheat gliadin. Moreover, they examined whether the harmful effects of secalin can be reduced by germinating cereal enzymes from oat, wheat and barley to hydrolyze secalin into short fragments as a pretreatment. The data showed that secalin did trigger toxic reactions in intestinal Caco-2 epithelial cells in a similar manner to gliadin. Secalin triggered epithelial cell layer permeability, tight junctional protein occludin and ZO-1 distortion, and actin reorganization. High-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectroscopy (HPLC-MS), showed that germinating barley enzymes best degraded the secalin and gliadin peptides. Further in vitro analysis showed that germinating barley enzyme pretreatment ameliorated all toxic secalin-triggered reactions. From these results, the team concludes that germinating enzymes from barley offer efficient degradation of rye secalin. In future, these enzymes might be utilized as a novel medical treatment for celiac disease or in food processing in order to develop high-quality celiac-safe food products. Such enzyme treatments might pave the way for either new treatments for celiac disease, or, new methods of processing rye for production of new, celiac-safe foods. SOURCE: Clinical & Experimental Immunology DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2249.2010.04119.x
  14. Celiac.com 09/12/2006 – A recent study by researchers at Stanford University has found that barley endoprotease EP-B2 is effective at digesting gluten in rats, and should be studied further as an “adjunct to diet control” in human celiac disease patients. This new finding adds to Stanford’s growing body of work on enzyme therapy as a possible treatment for those with celiac disease, and may one day lead to a effective treatment. Effect of barley endoprotease EP-B2 on gluten digestion in the intact rat. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2006 Sep;318(3):1178-86. Gass J, Vora H, Bethune MT, Gray GM, Khosla C. Stanford University. Abstract: "Celiac Sprue is a multi-factorial disease characterized by an intestinal inflammatory response to ingested gluten. Proteolytically resistant gluten peptides from wheat, rye and barley persist in the intestinal lumen, and elicit an immune response in genetically susceptible individuals. Here we demonstrate the in vivo ability of a gluten-digesting protease ("glutenase") to accelerate the breakdown of a gluten-rich solid meal. The proenzyme form of endoprotease B, isoform 2 from Hordeum vulgare (EP-B2) was orally administered to adult rats with a solid meal containing 1 g gluten. Gluten digestion in the stomach and small intestine was monitored as a function of enzyme dose and time by HPLC and mass spectrometry. In the absence of supplementary EP-B2, gluten was solubilized and proteolyzed to a limited extent in the stomach, and was hydrolyzed and assimilated mostly in the small intestine. In contrast, EP-B2 was remarkably effective at digesting gluten in the rat stomach in a dose and time dependent fashion. At a 1:25 EP-B2:gluten dose, the gastric concentration of the highly immunogenic 33-mer gliadin peptide reduced by more than 50-fold within 90 min, with no overt signs of toxicity. Evaluation of EP-B2 as an adjunct to diet control is therefore warranted in celiac patients."
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