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Found 19 results

  1. Does anyone know of a non alcoholic or low alcohol gluten free beer? Thanks!
  2. Celiac.com 11/14/2017 - One reason conventional beers remain unsafe for people with celiac disease is that they contain gluten fragments that push the finished product over the 20ppm standard for gluten-free products. Such gluten fragments in conventional beers render them unsuitable for people with celiac disease. There's been some confusion about the best ways to measure gluten levels in fermented foods and beverages. That confusion has prompted more confusion over the methods used to remove gluten from beers brewed with traditional barley. Are such beers gluten-free and safe for people with celiac disease? Many barley-based beers crafted to remove gluten use proprietary precipitation and/or enzymes, such as prolyl endopeptidases (PEP), that break down the gluten molecules. When these beers are tested for gluten using using competitive ELISA, the industry standard, they often test under 20 mg/kg, which is deemed safe for people with celiac disease. But are those tests accurate? Do the products the 20 ppm standard for gluten-free? A team of researchers recently set out to assess such results using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis. The research team included Michelle L. Colgrave, Keren Byrne, and Crispin A. Howitt. They are affiliated with CSIRO Agriculture and Food in Australia. The team's analyses showed gluten peptides derived from hydrolyzed fragments, many >30 kDa in size. This may render gluten levels above 20 ppm in the final product. As expected, the team found various types of barley gluten in all conventional beers they analyzed. However, they also found gluten fragments in some gluten-removed beers. This indicates that gluten breakdown was incomplete in some commercial gluten-removed beers. Furthermore, the research team was able to spot the peptides that made up the unbroken gluten fragments. They suggest that these results may warrant further optimization of PEP gluten reduction methods in commercial settings. Since most manufacturers place a heavy premium on product quality, I would look for brewers to use this kind of information to improve their gluten-reduction processes going forward. We clearly need to learn more about the scope of the potential issue. These analyses were made using liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Because they make precise measurements of small amounts of things, they are not practical for analyzing commercial products. So, we definitely need a better way to measure gluten levels in fermented products, since current methods can provide inaccurate results. What does this all mean for people with celiac disease? Obviously traditional beers beers with gluten levels over 20 ppm are best avoided. Gluten-free beers are likely fine. For celiacs who tolerate gluten-removed beers, there's little reason to change. If you have a favorite brand that works for you, that's likely okay. However, based on these findings, there is reason to be vigilant when trying a new gluten-removed beer. We advise people to follow their gut when consuming any product labeled gluten-free or gluten-reduced. As always, choose your products carefully. Even trusted products can change, or have something wrong with them from time to time. It's good practice to avoid any product seems to upset your stomach or trigger symptoms. Also, if you think a food labeled gluten-free is contaminated, by all means, report it to the FDA, and consider reporting it to the manufacturer. Lastly, it seems that manufacturers may want to take a closer look at their brewing process and their final product to be sure that gluten levels are under 20ppm. In the meantime, stay tuned for more developments on this and related stories. Source: J. Agric. Food Chem., Article ASAP. DOI: 10.1021/acs.jafc.7b03742
  3. Celiac.com 06/06/2017 - Word from the Great White north is that the Saskatchewan Liquor and Gaming Authority (SLGA) is preventing the sale of Estrella Damm Daura, following a warning from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). The SLGA, according to the company's website, is "a Treasury Board Crown Corporation responsible for the distribution, control and regulation of beverage alcohol in Saskatchewan. SLGA operates 75 retail liquor stores and there are approximately 600 private liquor retailers throughout the province." According to statements by SLGA spokesman David Morris, the CFIA advised SLGA and other liquor jurisdictions to "put the product on hold" last month over concerns that Daura Damm was brewed with products that contain gluten. Any decision by the SLGA to discontinue sales of Damm Daura would likely impact large numbers of customers in the region. It may also impact similar products from the EU. Brewed in Spain by S.A. Damm, using traditional barley ingredients, Estrella Damm Daura is filtered to reduce its gluten content to levels well below the 20 ppm required for products labeled gluten-free. S.A. Damm's company website says that "All batches are analyzed and certified by the CSIC before hitting the market," and that the company guarantees Daura Damm's gluten content is three parts per million or fewer. EU gluten-free standards permit any finished product below 20ppm gluten content to be labeled gluten-free. Canadian standards prohibit any product made with gluten-containing source ingredients from being labeled as gluten-free. Therein lies the apparent rub. Under EU standards, Estrella Damm Daura qualifies as a gluten-free beer. Under Canadian standards, it does not. No word yet on whether Canadian trade agreements make exceptions for EU products, such as beer. Meanwhile, potential beneficiaries are Canadian breweries, such as Rebellion Brewing Co., a Regina-based brewery that uses locally grown lentils to make its celiac-friendly Lentil Cream Ale. Rebellion brewmaster Mark Heise says SLGA's decision to cease ordering Estrella Damm Daura could be a "massive" opportunity. "It's huge for us," he says. No word yet on how far the Canadian authorities will go in their efforts to enforce their gluten-free standards against EU products, but they may have just fired the first shot. Stay tuned for more on these and other gluten-free stories as they develop. Read more at TheStarPhoenix.com
  4. Celiac.com 07/28/2017 - It's no secret that nearly all traditionally brewed beers contain barley. The flavor and body barley imparts on traditional beers is partly responsible for their rich, full taste. Finding alternatives to barley that are suitable for brewing gluten-free beer has been a challenge. One solution has been to brew beers with traditional barley ingredients, and then use a combination of enzyme action and filtration to render a final product that test below 20ppm gluten required for gluten-free products. However, that solution is problematic, partly because some countries, like Canada, do not consider such beers to be gluten-free. That may be set to change, a team reported recently in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that beers made with Witkop teff grains may be a good alternative to traditionally brewed barley beers. Teff is a small gluten-free cereal native to Ethiopia. Teff has remained largely below the radar in western countries, especially where gluten-free products are concerned. It's just not used very much, and not much is known about how it might be used. Now, Valeria Sileoni and her colleagues have begun to examine the potential of a variety of teff called Witkop as a raw material for malting and brewing. To begin with, the researchers examined the use of Witkop teff in the malting process, during which grains are steeped, germinated and dried. They were looking to establish the optimal malting conditions. They found that Witkop teff took longer to malt than barley, and that the teff uses different enzymes to break down sugars. The researchers concluded that Witkop teff grains have potential as a raw material for beer production, but would likely require custom malting equipment on an industrial scale. Stay tuned for more on Teff's potential in the world of gluten-free brewing. Source: Materials provided by American Chemical Society.
  5. Celiac.com 04/15/2017 - Raw materials used by breweries include barley. A characteristic feature of this grain is the presence of gluten proteins which also includes hordein. This group of proteins are the trigger of celiac disease symptoms [Darewicz, Dziuba, Jaszczak: "Celiakia – aspekty molekularne, technologiczne, dietetyczne." PrzemysÅ‚ Spożywczy, styczeÅ„, 2011] . This issue raises the need to seek new methods of brewing that allow for the elimination of gluten proteins from the beer [swora E., Stankowiak-Kulpa H., Mazur M. 2009. Dieta bezglutenowa w chorobie trzewnej. Nowiny Lekarskie 78, 5-6, 324-329]. The biggest problem for coeliac patients is to identify permitted foods. Food manufacturers know about the above problem and are offering new products for people with celiac disease. [CichaÅ„ska B.A., 2009. Problemy z rozróżnianiem żywnoÅ›ci bezglutenowej. Pediatria WspóÅ‚czesna. Gastroenterologia, Hepatologia i Å»ywienie Dziecka 2009, 11, 3, 117-122.] The market offers access to a gluten-free beer. Beer of this type can be prepared in one of two ways, either by using materials that do not contain gluten or by removing gluten during the production of beer. Such products are, however, expensive. Traditional market beers are not tested for gluten content, which may differ from one brand to the next. Barley, hops, yeast and water are the basic raw materials for conventional beer production. Gluten in beer is only in the barley or wheat, from which malt is produced. During malting, barley is subjected to the processes of soaking, germination and drying. At that time, amylolytic and proteolytic enzyme activity increases and grain composition is undergoing changes. Knowledge about the migration through various stages of beer production and the final level of these proteins or their "toxic" fractions is crucial to ensuring customers about the safety of the beverage they will consume. Therefore, it is important to conduct research to better understand the role and the amount of unwanted hordein and/or wheat prolamin in the production of beer. Malt has become a subject of research because of its harmful potential for patients with celiac disease. In a study conducted by Czech scientists different species of barley, malt and beer were analyzed. Beers analyzed for gluten content were characterized by very different gluten contents. The level of gluten in raw cereals ranges from 18-68 g/kg. After comparing the different types of beers, in terms of the gluten concentration, the results were as follows: non-alcoholic beer Raw seed contained 50.4 ± 1.8 g per kg of gluten and comparing to it malt 68 ± 4 g per kg of gluten. Higher levels of gluten in malt have been confirmed in studies on other types of barley and other crops derived from a corresponding malt from which they were produced under similar conditions. Malt barley grains are subjected to extraction during mashing. Gluten content was examined during the entire production process. The amount of protein decreases during the production process due to precipitation of proteins in the fermentation mash, at the adsorption stage, and during beer stabilization. Researchers say that the gluten content in beer is about three times lower than in the raw barley grain. The gluten content changes at each stage of the beer production as is shown below: malt> sweet wort> wort after chop adding > beer> stabilized beer. Most of the proteins in the sharps (milled barley) are extracted which is a remnant of the filtration process in the mash tun (the vessel where the wort is boiled). Only a small part of the gluten goes to sweet wort – 1.75%. A slight decrease was recorded after the boiling process with the addition of hops -1.7%. During the fermentation process the pH decreases, this causes the precipitation of the polypeptides and their adsorption on the surface of yeast cells. Only 0.21% of the initial gluten content remains in the beer. After the filtration process beer is subjected to colloidal stabilization with PVPP - polyvinylpolypyrrolidone and silico gel (kiesegel) and then they are removed. This process results in lowering gluten content to less than 0.11% of the initial gluten content of barley [immunochemical determination of gluten in Malts and Beers, Food Additives and Contaminants; TFAC-2005-365.R1, 29-Mar-2006; Dostálek, Pavel; Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague, Department of Fermentation and Bioengineering Chemistry]. The researchers used three methods to test the gluten content of beer. Their results differ from each other. Results show that to accurately estimate the amount of proteins and peptides dangerous to people with celiac disease, we must first develop a good methodology for the analysis. This will give the exact content of these harmful substances and provide real security to customers. If we use the method demonstrating the largest gluten protein content, only 30% of the samples were safe for patients. According to the authors there is no safe beer brewed from barley or wheat if we accept that the maximum tolerable daily intake of gluten is 10 mg. The law of the European Commission says that gluten-free food must contain less than 20 mg. per kg. Proteins present in the beers are removed during production through product stability and are hydrolysed by proteolytic enzymes present in the various stages of production. Partially hydrolyzed prolamines contained in beer are still "toxic peptides"- short protein fragments containing from a few to several amino acid residues. These fragments, rich in proline, trigger a series of reactions from the immune system, leading to celiac disease [Commission Regulation (European Communities) No 41/2009 of 20 January 2009, the Official Journal of the European Union, 21.1.2009, L 16 / 3]. The most obvious method for the production of gluten-free beer is to use only gluten-free raw materials. In the production of such a beer a lot of attention must be paid to remove unwanted components from the beer. Technologists involved in the production of beer specialize in the removal of proteins from beer and controlling their levels, as they can reduce colloidal stability of the beer flavor. Removing or reducing the amount of these proteins may be a way to achieve our goal. Confounding factors in the production of gluten-free beer can be: Selection of barley varieties with a low content of protein and the corresponding enzymatic apparatus; Mashing process modified by deeper proteolysis, similar methods are used in the manufacture of gluten-free bread searching for enzymes capable of degrading specific proteins and peptides; Methods of striving for maximum distribution and precipitation of proteins with the use of adsorbents; The use of proteolytic enzymes in the production and stabilization of fermentation, such as amyloglucosidase is used to improve fermentation or β-glucanase to reduce viscosity. The enzyme used in the end may be proline endopeptidase; Implementation of the adsorbent during the stabilization phase of beer to remove residual proteins and peptides. Conventional materials can be used, if the genetically modified seeds will be devoid of genes responsible for the production of gliadin. However, such seeds are not yet available and the use of transgenic food additives is prohibited in many countries. Modification of the enzymes to reduce the gluten content can be achieved in two ways. Genetically modified yeast capable of expressing specific enzymes capable of degrading the protein can be used, or adding the enzyme - transglutaminase - directly during the production can also be done. These methods each have their own advantages, because with the right methodology a beer can be produced without loss of its natural taste. Another method of manufacture of gluten-free beer is the use of cereals rich in carbohydrates that do not contain gluten. These include amaranth, buckwheat, quinoa, sorghum, millet, corn, and rice. We can also add raw materials, the lack of native amylolytic enzymes must be compensated by the addition of external enzymes. However, this is a factor which increases costs. Colorants and flavorings also have to be added [Celiac Disease, Beer and Brewing, Michael J. Lewis, Emeritus Professor of Brewing Science Department of Food Science and Technology, University of California Davis]. Gluten-free raw materials Cereals that are not taxonomically close to wheat, barley and rye are safe for people with celiac disease. Potential sources of gluten-free beer include: sorghum, corn, brown rice, millet, teff, buckwheat, and amaranth. At present, one of the best gluten-free beer production methods is to use gluten-free raw materials and avoid any cross-contamination. Gluten-free beer production technology is not a new technology. Some African tribes have produced beer based on sorghum and corn for 20 years. It turns out that buckwheat has a large potential for the production of gluten-free beer. Even unhulled seeds can be used. Husks can be used as the filtering material in the filter vat. The resulting malt is characterized by a taste reminiscent of toffee with a slightly nutty flavor. One of the major problems with buckwheat beer production is very low enzyme activity. It is several times lower than in barley enzymes. In addition, the high content of polysaccharides increases the viscosity of the solution. However, through rheological tests scientists have developed optimal methods in pilot studies and demonstrated that it is possible to produce a gluten-free beer with buckwheat. [brewing New technologies, CW Bamforth Published by Woodhead Publishing Limited, Abington Hall, Abington, Cambridge CB1 6AH, England, First published 2006, Woodhead Publishing Limited and CRC Press LLC ß 2006, Woodhead Publishing Limited]. As the diagnostic methods for identifying celiac disease improve every year and more and more people are diagnosed with coeliac disease, the demand for this kind of drink will continue to grow. In addition, new types of beer can attract people who are interested in trying new tastes and making alternative choices.
  6. Celiac.com 04/07/2017 - If watching all those pints of Guinness being downed on St. Patrick's Day left you wishing that someone, somewhere in Ireland, would brew a tasty gluten-free stout, your wish has come true. The people at the 9 White Deer brewery have heard your whispered wishes and responded with Stag Saor. Ireland's first gluten-free stout, a beer that puts a fresh twist on the Emerald Isle's long stout-brewing tradition. Now, a gluten-free stout was not always part of the plan. Less than a year after found the 9 White Deer microbrewery, co-founder, Don O'Leary was diagnosed with a gluten intolerance. Rather than view this development as a setback, however, O'Leary and his partners used it as fuel to drive their business. Working with his partner, the former marine engineer, Gordon Lucey , O'Leary set about creating the company's first gluten-free brew. O'Leary says that developing Stag Saor "changed everything for the business." Their market research taught them that, while Ireland has a fairly high percentage of people with celiac disease, it has a relatively paltry number of gluten-free beers. Saor launched in 2015 and received a bronze medal at the 2016 Blás na hEireann awards, winning against traditional beers in a blind taste test. Offered a preview sip of the new stout, writer Kevin Kennedy, calls the beer "top quality... as good as if not better, than any bottled stout I've had in the past." The 9 White Deer brewery draws its name from a 6th Century fable, in which angels told the famous Irish Saint, Gobnait, that she would establish an Abbey and a church on a site where she found 9 White Deer. The sight is just down the road from the brewery, which now employs eight people, in Ballyvourney, Co. Cork. Source: Newstalk.com
  7. I have only been diagnosed for about 5 months, so I'm still learning. I haven't had any beer except gluten free beer in since dx. However, a friend of mine who has had celiacs for decades was recently drinking a regular beer, and when asked, he said that the process of making the beer made the gluten in it no longer a problem for celiacs. I found this article online about it. Has anyone else discovered that they can (or can't!) drink regular beer? Almost all the other articles say celiacs cannot have regular beer. I guess I could just try it and see if I get glutened, but I wanted to ask all your advice. https://www.craftbeer.com/attachments/0001/6865/Celiac_Disease.pdf
  8. Celiac.com 12/30/2016 - The San Francisco Bay area is home to a rich heritage of running and athletics, including more than a few folks who like to do extreme things. Whether it’s a swim to Alcatraz and back, ultra-long distance running, zany single speed mountain biking, or a combination of all three, San Francisco has it all. And now it has a gluten-removed beer for those folks. For all the people who think a muddy six mile hike is best done twice, and at a jog, there is now a beer for you. For anyone who likes to push their body to the extreme and then sit down with friends and revel in the suffering, there is Sufferfest. Sufferfest beer was created by lifelong athlete, and gluten-intolerance sufferer Caitlin Landesberg to capture the feeling of accomplishment and comradery that followed the sufferfest that was her first endurance race, Marin’s notorious Double Dispea. Brewed with the same competitive approach Landesberg brought to trail running and endurance events, Sufferfest is a gluten-removed beer designed for athletes who love to bond over moments of post-race elation that come with surviving extreme exertion. Landesberg brews a traditional full barley, malt-based beer, and uses Brewers Clarex, an enzyme that promotes clarity and stabilization, and reduces gluten levels to below 10ppm. According to their website, "Sufferfest beer is fermented from grains containing gluten and crafted to remove gluten. Our finished beer is analyzed in a lab that uses best-in-industry R5- Gliadin ELISA assay and registers at the lowest detection limit possible, ensuring that only trace amounts of gluten are present." Women-owned Sufferfest currently makes an IPA called Taper, and a Pilsner called Epic. Learn more at Sufferfestbeer.com.
  9. Hi I'm Jay and my longtime girlfriend was just diagnosed with Celiac via Lab results and biopsy ( I actually have type 1 diabetes). I have a few questions about this disease and the gluten-free lifestyle. Is this an "All or none" kind of thing? Can some people cheat occasionally and sneak a little Gluten here and there or does she have to completely cut out the Gluten, forever? The biggest concern for her is the beer. Beer is her hobby, sounds funny and no she is not an alcoholic but she loves craft beer and beer culture. Most of our vacations are mapped out by which new brewery we will be close to. I have tried gluten-free beer before in the past and it was NOT good. Does anybody have any good hoppy beer recommendations? Does anybody have a favorite book on Celiac disease. I'm trying to keep things positive but as soon as you do an internet search on the topic, things get pretty scary (just like any other medical condition). Good cookbook recommendations? Finally, what is the biggest misconception you have heard about this disease? What was the hardest thing for you to cope with? Thanks, Jay
  10. "The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today released a proposed rule to establish requirements for fermented and hydrolyzed foods, or foods that contain fermented or hydrolyzed ingredients, and bear the “gluten-free” claim. The proposed rule, titled “Gluten-Free Labeling of Fermented or Hydrolyzed Foods,” pertains to foods such as yogurt, sauerkraut, pickles, cheese, green olives, vinegar, and FDA regulated beers....." http://www.fda.gov/Food/NewsEvents/ConstituentUpdates/ucm472778.htm
  11. Our household is gluten free, with the exception of hubby drinking regular beer. I've been gluten-free for about 1.5 years so I'm still sorting out how sensitive I am - and at this point, I think I have reacted to things like CC on deli meat from slicer (actual meat was gluten-free), accidental sip of 'real beer', etc. I think I was recently CC'd by kissing my husband after he drank beer - is that crazy? Also wondering if glasses might be 'contaminated.' Wondering if anyone has experience with this. He's been so supportive giving up wheat / gluten, etc. but he is a beer lover so I don't want to have to tell him that he can't drink beer in the house. Thanks!
  12. Hi guys, my girlfriend is Coeliac so I've joined this site to help to better understand her condition and find ways to simply make her diet more enjoyable. First post so please be kind. My question is about 'Gluten Free' Beer and Ale, from what I gather there is some contention about these beers, I believe Estrella Daura (which she does drink and doesn't react too) to be made without wheat/barley so is considered safer than other Beers/ales which are made with 'de-glutenized' barley (like Daas, Greens and Omission). One of the things she misses most is Ale (which you can only seem to get made with 'de-glutenized barley' so it would be great to get some of these ales. I really just wanted to hear about some of your experiences and to see if anyone had any recommendation or advice for me? Or if anyone knows of a safe gluten-free Ale which isn't made using this process? Many Thanks, Ricky
  13. Hey guys, As a person with celiac disease, I was super excited after trying Two Brothers Prairie Path beer, after claiming they are gluten free (with less than 5ppm of gluten). I had gotten sick off this beer 3x. So I decided to do my own test. I used the EZ gluten strips which detect any trace amount of gluten. This kit tells you if a product is Negative for gluten, Positive, High Positive, or Very High Positive for gluten. Results: "very high positive for gluten" I was so sad! For a company to claim they are gluten free, they are not!!! This kit is great and I highly recommend it. It does cost a lot, but I think it's worth testing products you have in your diet a lot. For me: I gotta check my booze I tested Red Box wine, Jack Daniels whiskey, and Jamesons whiskey: they all came back clear: Negative for gluten!!! This kit is very accurate as I have tested crackers and leftovers from a restaurant I got sick off of and they as well tested positive for gluten. Just thought I'd let ya know. So do NOT buy Prairie Path unless you want to go diarrhea and destroy your intestines.
  14. Hi all. Cider is my gluten-free drink of choice, especially in the lovely fall weather. Yesterday the fiance bought some beer for himself and some Harpoon Cider for me. Harpoon labels the beer "naturally gluten free" - I've had it twice before, once before being diagnosed, and once a few months back when there was significant drinking involved. My glutening symptoms are best described as "hangover-like" - headache, digestive issues, achy body. I had 2.5 last night - pushing it for a week night, but hey, we're wedding planning, I needed something to push me through! Today I've got the symptoms of either a mild hangover or mild glutening - I've had much, much worse. Harpoon says they only use freshly pressed apples and their in-house yeast - the yeast has me worried now, that it could be a by-product of their beers. Has anyone else had similar issues? I see from googling that many sites (from a year or two ago) assert it is NOT gluten-free, but they don't explain why, and I didn't know if this had changed. The Harpoon website also notes it tests to below 20 ppm - which makes me nervous too, because why both even testing it if it's "naturally gluten free"? Appreciate anyone else's experience. I like it because it's less sweet than Angry Orchard etc, and almost has a beer-esque taste -- which maybe should have been a red flag? I'm likely going to call them later if this doesn't pass.
  15. Hey guys, I was diagnosed with Celiac Sprue based on tissue transglutaminase anti-body screening almost six years ago. I've been gluten free ever since. It wasn't until about 2-3 years ago that gluten free beer became a bit of a trend and my brother in law have got in to home brewing our very own gluten free beer. For our small 5 gallon batches every piece of equipment that I've used has been dedicated gluten free from the day I bought it. The question I have for everyone is: How comfortable are people drinking gluten free beer on non-dedicated gluten free lines? I believe that neither redbridge nor bards produces their gluten-free beers on dedicated lines, they instead clean the shared equipment. I wanted to get the view of other celiacs about gluten free beer (and for now I'm completely ignoring beer that tries to lower its barley content like estrella and omission). Thanks guys
  16. I have an underactive thyroid (hashimotos) for which I take thyroid replacement thereapy . and I self diagnosed myself as gluten sensitive...had a host of cognitive problems once upon a time...no longer. As I understand it, people with the auto-immune disease of hashimoto thyroiditis, can also have the auto-immune disease of Celiacs..and maybe vice/versa ?? I don't know absolutely if this is true..my doctor has never heard of the corralation..but it all seems a very young science. I decided to believe this was true back when I was chin deep in my brain fogg and wondering what was going on , and thats why I cut out gluten..and all my problems dissapeared. I went and found substitutes to most of my regular diet and for the most part I forget i'm on one. but.. beer..not a big drinker me, but its the only alcohol I like and I miss it a bit..most gluten free beer seems to be made of sorgum..which is too sweet for me...other beers are made of rye but have the gluten protein chemically destroyed, a process which I don't trust..so I avoid that..I've recently stumbled apon one made of millet. heres my problem..I found out today that millet is a mild thyroid peroxidase inhibitor. It can make you grow a goiter in large amounts if you have a thyroid disease..so can sorgum...so can tapioca..which is what my gluten free bread is partially made out of. my question is : if people who have celiacs can often have thyroid problems too, why are gluten free products often made of non-thyroid friendly ingrediants?
  17. I was just diagnosed with celiac disease 5 weeks ago. I've been doing really well but the thing I miss most is beer. There is nothing like sitting by a campfire with an ice cold beer. I have tried Redbridge but I don't really love it. My favorite is Leinenkugel Summer Shandy or Blue Moon. Does anybody have any suggestions for me? Thank you!
  18. Hello everyone. I'm new to this site and newly gluten-free. I have been trying different types of beers to see if I can find one that tastes like Bud Lite or similar brands. I don't like dark beers, and I was hoping there was a beer that tasted closer to a lite beer. I have tried Redbridge, but it has an odd flavor to me. I've had ciders, but I'm sick of those. I've tried Omission, and that was absolutely disgusting to me. Bards is ok, but still not lite beer. I know that it will be difficult. I tried the raspberry New Planet which was good, but I'm thinking it was only good because it tasted like raspberries instead of beer. Any other suggestions?
  19. lcolebank

    It's Not You, It's Celiac

    I was hanging at the pool one gorgeous afternoon and received a call from my GP. She had some interesting test results. She was getting ready to tell me something I had figured out a while ago but had not wanted to remotely admit. You seem, for sometime I had noticed I felt bad after eating breads or pasta and my symptoms were getting increasingly worse. As as I said I was by the pool...so it was late Spring...I had been sick since Christmas. I started asking for tests because I was dizzy, exhausted and had tingling in my feet. The preliminary tests had shown vitamin deficiencies and low thyroid. I did my own research. I knew that there should be an underlying reason for all of this. And I wasn't satisfied just taking supplements. Anyway, my doc confirmed (kinda) my suspicions.... My gene testing for Celiacs was double positive. Even though I expected the results to be positive, I was at once overwhelmed. My DH immediately got me a beer (how could he know that it was a big slap in my gluten-sick face?). I gratefully drank said beer and followed it with a couple more...All the while knowing we were headed for a painful break-up... The next day...I started my gluten-free diet. Friends were nice. They brought by every gluten-free beer they could find. I still haven't found one that will do...however, I plan on trying them all.