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Found 3 results

  1. Celiac.com 06/11/2016 - It's never become so clear to me how much our health and quality of life are dependent upon the food we eat since seeing myself, my family and more than my share of celiac friends and acquaintances make the transition to grain-free from gluten-free. This is evident in witnessing such positive results just from eating a biologically appropriate diet, the paleo diet, which is grain-free and thus gluten-free. Some have this simple diet termed as the caveman diet, the paleolithic diet and what-have you, but in essence it has been deemed "man's original" diet. In my approaches to the topics of the paleo diet, I discovered the affects this diet has on man's health as a low glycemic alternative to man's diet, aiding ills and physical betterment through glycemic control. In my research and through working with many professionals over the years I've explored a variety of diet, health and lifestyle regimens and looked in depth into the prevailing topic of non-responsive celiacs, also known as refractory celiac disease. The paleo gluten-free diet is based on the premise that humans do best eating the foods our ancestors ate prior to the advent of agriculture and animal husbandry around 10,000 B.C. This proven theory is that modern humans do best on paleolithic nutrition because human genetics have largely remained the same since the pre-agricultural era, and thus our genetic makeup is best suited to the ancestral human diet—no grains at all. Taking our current bodies and then applying how man ate back in the day has been having profound effects on the general health and well-being within research and study results. According to research, pre-agricultural humans were free of the diseases of the civilized world such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, obesity, and autoimmune diseases. Modern studies, including clinical studies, have shown as well that eating paleo gluten-free can help or reduce risks of a variety of serious health conditions. This includes issues associated with high insulin and blood sugar levels, which can lead to a variety of diseases and health conditions such as hypertension, high cholesterol levels, obesity, type 2 diabetes and gout. That's because many foods on the paleo gluten-free diet are low-glycemic, which is evidenced in the ills they are void of, which we now classify as "normal" or aging, or an aging "disease". Grains are biologically similar to table sugar, causing an unhealthy spike in insulin upon consumption. Most of the carbohydrates consumed on the paleo gluten-free diet, consisting of a variety of vegetables, fruits, proteins and healthy fats are low-glycemic. Honey, maple syrups, etc. are currently debatable and this is another topic all together. What's the big deal about the Glycemic Index? According to studies, a low-glycemic diet can help with obesity, type 2 diabetes, polycystic ovarian syndrome, cardiovascular disease, as well as other conditions such as Alzheimer's, depression and non-responsive celiac disease. Some of the benefits of low glycemic eating include: improved weight loss, decreased hypoglycemia, steadier moods, mental clarity, sleep improvement, and reduced food cravings, which means less binge eating. This also means less overweight children with early onset diabetes, which is truly a rapidly growing concern. It is to our benefit that we all take a good look at our diets and the effects that the carbohydrate intake of the currently prevailing "standard" gluten-free diet has on our bodies. Let's determine if what we are eating could be causing health conditions that could possibly be reversed or avoided. Should we be willing to entertain the idea of change? The change could be as simple as taking a sincere look at man's original diet, the diet we were biologically designed to live on. Could our original diet of no grains, low carbohydrates and high "good" fats be a door we need to open, step through with our eyes wide open and be willing to learn about? I truly believe this topic answers many mysteries and unresolved diagnoses.
  2. Celiac.com 04/15/2009 - A recent clinical study has shown B vitamins to be beneficial for celiac sufferers following gluten-free diets. Vitamin deficiency and less than optimal health are common problems for people with celiac disease, even those who faithfully follow a gluten-free diet. Common problems associated with long-term celiac disease include general malaise, and less than optimal well-being. To better understand the benefits of supplemental doses of B vitamins for patients with celia disease, a team of researchers recently set out to evaluate the biochemical and clinical effects of B vitamin supplements in adults with long-term celiac disease. The research was made up of doctors C. Hallert, M. Svensson, J. Tholstrup, and B. Hultberg. The team assembled a group of 65 adults with celiac disease for a double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial. 61% of the group was female, and each had followed a gluten-free diet for several years. For 6 months, patients received daily doses of either a placebo, or of B vitamins in the amount of 0.8 mg folic acid, 0.5 mg cyanocobalamin and 3 mg pyridoxine. At the end of the trial period, doctors gauged vitamin effectiveness by measuring psychological general well-being (PGWB), together with total levels of plasma total homocysteine (tHcy), a reliable indicator of B vitamin status. In all, 57 of the 61 enrolled patients completed the trial (88%). Baseline tHcy levels for these patients averaged 11.7 micromoles/L (range = 7.4 to 23.0), which was markedly higher than the 10.2 micromoles/L for the control group (range = 6.7 to 22.6) (P < 0.01). After the B vitamin treatment, patient tHcy levels dropped an average of 34% (P < 0.001). Patients experienced substantial improvement in well-being (P < 0.01). Even patients who initially reported poor well-being showed notable improvements in Anxiety (P < 0.05) and Depressed Mood (P < 0.05) . These improvements, the normalization of tHcy levels, together with the substantial increase in well-being, led the research team to conclude that people living gluten-free with long-term celiac disease do indeed benefit from daily supplemental doses of vitamin B, and that doctors should consider advising the use of B vitamins supplements for these patients. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2009 Apr 15;29(8):811-6.
  3. Celiac.com 04/28/2008 - A life-long gluten-free diet is currently the only treatment for celiac disease. However, many foods thought to be gluten-free actually contain small amounts of gluten, making it difficult to maintain a truly gluten-free diet. Gluten is made up of glutenin and gliadin proteins. Gliadin is only partially digested in the small intestine and the resulting peptides are responsible for the inflammation and intestinal tissue damage in people with celiac disease. Because probiotic bacteria have been shown to digest gluten proteins to harmless peptides, supplementation with probiotics may be beneficial for people with celiac disease. To begin testing this hypothesis, researchers in Finland added probiotic bacteria to cultures of intestinal epithelial cells (cells that line the intestine) to determine their effect on gliadin-induced cellular damage. Gliadin-induced damage to intestinal epithelial cells includes increased permeability of the epithelial layer, alteration of tight junctions between cells (which controls the passage of materials across the intestinal wall), and structural changes such as “ruffling” of the cell edges. Two probiotic bacterial species were evaluated: Lactobacillus fermentum and Bifidobacterium lactis. In this study, B. lactis was able to inhibit permeability caused by gliadin. Additionally, both B. lactis and L. fermentum were able to protect against cell ruffling and alterations in tight junctions. The bacteria alone (without gliadin) did not cause any significant changes to the intestinal epithelial cells. Researchers concluded that Bifidobacterium lactis may be a useful addition to a gluten-free diet. Supplementation with this probiotic appears to be able to reduce the damage caused by eating gluten-contaminated foods and may even accelerate healing after initiating a gluten-free diet. It is important to note the researchers do not suggest that supplementation with probiotics could take the place of a gluten-free diet in the treatment of celiac disease. Lindfors et al. Live probiotic Bifidobacterium lactis bacteria inhibit the toxic effects induced by wheat gliadin in epithelial cell culture - Clin Exp Immunol. 2008 Apr 16.
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