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Found 5 results

  1. Celiac.com 01/30/2018 - Numerous clinicians have reported higher levels of celiac disease markers in their patients with psoriasis. A number of researchers believe that some psoriasis patients suffer from asymptomatic celiac disease, and a number of patients have reported symptom improvements with gluten-free diets. A team of researchers recently set out to determine the prevalence of antigliadin IgA antibodies in psoriasis vulgaris, and to assess the response of seropositive patients to a gluten-free diet. The research team included Nikolai A Kolchak, Maria K Tetarnikova, Maria S Theodoropoulou, Alexandra P Michalopoulou, and Demetrios S Theodoropoulos. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Hematology, Omsk State Medical Academy, Omsk, Russia; Dermatology Private Practice, Chelyabinsk, Russia; Department of Pharmacy, Trikala General Hospital, Trikala, Greece; Department of Philosophy and Social Studies, School of Philosophy, University of Crete, Rethymnon, Greece; and Allergy Associates of La Crosse, Onalaska, WI, USA. The team assessed the prevalence of gliadin IgA antibodies among patients with psoriasis in an urban population, along with noting the clinical effects of a strict gluten-free diet. The team recruited 97 patients with Psoriasis Area and Severity Index greater than 2.4 from a dermatology clinic. They measured gliadin IgA antibodies in all participants and in 91 control subjects. They found elevated gliadin IgA antibodies in 13 patients, and two controls. All 13 patients were placed on a strict gluten-free diet without any other modifications in their ongoing treatment of psoriasis. Psoriasis patients who do not have celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity commonly show high levels of antigliadin IgA antibody. These results show that antigliadin IgA testing can identify psoriasis patients likely to benefit from a gluten-free diet. Source: Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare. DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/JMDH.S122256
  2. Celiac.com 11/21/2014 - When most people think of celiac disease, they think about gastrointestinal symptoms. However, researchers have documented a number of other medical conditions that are associated with celiac disease, and which improve when patients follow a strict gluten-free diet. The recent case of a 75-year old man who experienced a dramatic recovery from Parkinson's disease after eliminating all forms of gluten from his diet for three months, has researchers thinking about the possibility that gluten sensitivity may be related to Parkinson's disease. In fact, there is some evidence that patients with epilepsy and other conditions may benefit from ketogenic low carb and gluten-free diets. The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, low-carbohydrate, and adequate protein diet developed 90 years ago at the Mayo Clinic. The high fat content creates ketosis, which appears to prevent seizures. In addition to the ketogenic diet, there are several other high-fat, low-carbohydrate diets for seizure control: low-glycemic-index, medium-chain triglyceride, and modified Atkins diets. All require medical supervision and vitamin and mineral supplements. In another example of food serving as medicine, high fat low carb ketogenic diets increasingly are being used to control seizures in epilepsy patients. As reported in Medscape, ketogenic diets made a significant difference for many patients with epilepsy who cannot control their seizures with medication. In one study, more than 20 percent of the patients used the traditional ketogenic diet, while the rest used a modified Atkins diet that included medium-chain triglyceride supplements. These patients saw dramatic improvements. In addition to reducing the number and severity of seizures, 65 percent of patients felt "more alert or brighter," while 35 percent had "more energy." Many of the patients also had shorter seizures when they occurred. Sources: Epilepsy Behav. 2014;37C:59-70. doi: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2014.05.031 J Neurol. 2014 Feb;261(2):443-5. doi: 10.1007/s00415-014-7245-7
  3. Celiac.com 02/17/2014 - Efforts to promote increased acreage for gluten-free crops, such as sorghum, will likely increase now that the farm bill has been signed into law. That's partly because acreage for big crops such as corn and soybeans have run well over their historic levels, and prices are falling, and partly because target prices in the farm bill set higher prices for sorghum than for corn. Until now, corn had been eating steadily into sorghum’s old base of 11.6 million acres. However, new markets in China and the growing sales of gluten-free products at home are raising demand for sorghum. Still, corn and beans alone accounted for nearly half of all 2012 receipts, basically matching the revenues of all other program crops plus the revenue-rich fruit and vegetable market. "We compete against corn and soybeans in the North. We compete against cotton in the South,” says Tim Lust, CEO for the National Sorghum Producers in Lubbock, Texas. He adds that losing acres can mean losing capital investment. Thankfully, crops like sorghum have a formidable champion in Senate Agriculture Committee chair Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.), who has worked to help strengthen specialty crops in the face of major cuts from existing commodity programs. Says Robert Guenther, senior vice president for policy with the United Fresh Produce Association, “Stabenow has been a champion for specialty crops, fruits and vegetables since she has been in Congress. She has been a strong proponent of our issues.” Given the success of Stabenow and her supporters, at least one of the results of the legislation signed by the president will likely be slightly better market conditions for growers of gluten-free crops. Source: Politico.com
  4. Celiac.com 03/10/2009 - A recent study confirms that B-vitamin supplements are helpful in raising vitamin B6, B12 and folate levels and in reducing homocysteine levels in people with celiac disease. Celiac disease is a typical malabsorption syndrome, and is associated with higher rates of numerous deficiencies, including folate and vitamin B12. People with celiac disease face higher rates of Hyperhomocysteinemia than do healthy controls. A team of Dutch researchers led by Dr. Muhammed Hadithi recently set out to evaluate the efficacy of daily supplements of vitamin B6, B12 and folate on homocysteine levels in patients with celiac disease. The study measured levels of vitamin B6, folate, vitamin B12, and fasting plasma homocysteine in 51 adults with celiac disease and 50 healthy control subjects of similar age and sex. The results show that the celiac disease subjects who used vitamin supplements had higher blood levels of vitamin B6 (P = 0.003), folate (P < 0.001), and vitamin B12 (P = 0.012) than celiac patients who did not use supplements, or healthy controls (P = 0.035, P < 0.001, P = 0.007, for vitamin B6, folate, and vitamin B12, respectively). Patients who use vitamin supplements also showed lower levels of plasma homocysteine than in patients who did not (P = 0.001) or healthy controls (P = 0.003). Vitamin B6 and folate were both associated with homocysteine levels, whereas vitamin B12 was not. Twenty-four (48%) of 50 controls and 23 (50%) of 46 of the celiac disease patients carried the MTHFR thermolabile variant T-allele (P = 0.89). The research team concludes that Homocysteine levels are dependent on Marsh classification and the regular use of B-vitamin supplements reduces of homocysteine levels in patients with celiac disease.The study confirms earlier studies suggesting that both the presence and severity of celiac disease determined homocysteine levels. The regular use of supplemental B vitamins resulted in higher levels of serum vitamin B6, folate, vitamin B12 and lower levels of plasma homocysteine in patients with celiac disease. Moreover, supplemental B vitamins seem to offer protection against the effects of villous atrophy on homocysteine levels, independent of the genetic susceptibility status as determined by carriage of the C677T polymorphism of 5,10 methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase. World J Gastroenterol. 2009;15:955–960
  5. Celiac.com 01/25/2007 - Under an FDA proposal published yesterday, food companies will have to meet new standards before labeling their products as gluten-free. It also provided a new definition for gluten-free which will give individuals with celiac disease greater confidence that specially labeled foods are in fact, safe for them to eat, according to the American Celiac Disease Alliance (ACDA). The Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act (FALCPA) passed by Congress in 2004, requires food manufacturers to clearly state if a product contains any of the eight major food allergens: milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, wheat, and soy. It also required the FDA to develop and implement rules for using the term ‘gluten-free’ on food packaging. Adhering to the gluten-free diet is the only course of treatment for celiac disease, a genetic digestive disorder. The condition, triggered by eating the protein gluten which is found in the grains wheat, rye, and barley, and hybrids of these grains affects an estimated 2 to 3 million Americans. There is no single, world-wide accepted definition of gluten-free labeling. The levels of acceptable gluten vary from country to country, as do the symbols and terminology, permissible in the labeling. Research establishing a safe threshold of gluten consumption for those with celiac disease was recently published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. The study, conducted by members of the ACDA at the University of Maryland and referenced by the FDA, concludes that celiacs can safely tolerate up to 20 parts per million (ppm) of gluten a day. “The FDA listened to patients, food manufacturers, and members of the scientific community and came up with a well thought out proposal,” said Andrea Levario, Executive Director of the ACDA. There is so little research about the gluten-free diet and safe consumption levels that the agency is seeking comments on a number of related issues including: The appropriateness of 20 ppm gluten as the proposed threshold level as determined using an ELISA based testing method; The effect that adoption of a lower threshold level would have on individuals with celiac disease and on industry; Whether a lower threshold level might effect (limit availability of) commercially available foods labeled gluten-free in the United States; Whether a reduced availability would have a negative impact individuals with celiac disease; and Whether oats should be included in the definition of prohibited grains. In the absence of federal rules, food companies have been using a variety of standards in manufacturing gluten-free products. This creates confusion and skepticism among individuals whose health depends on clear, accurate labeling. With only 90,000 out of an estimated 2 million celiacs diagnosed, manufacturers know that uniformity and consistency will benefit them as well consumers, said Levario. The FDA has prepared a series of questions and answers to help consumers understand the provisions of the proposal. For a copy go to: http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/glutqa.html ; and for a copy of the gluten-free labeling guidelines go to: http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~lrd/fr070123.html . About the ACDA The American Celiac Disease Alliance (ACDA) was established in March 2003 to provide leadership on public policy issues affecting those with celiac disease, an inherited autoimmune disorder affecting children and adults. The non-profit serves as a national umbrella organization representing all segments of the celiac community -- research centers, physicians, patients, food manufacturers, print media, and the service industry.
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