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Found 7 results

  1. Celiac.com 03/04/2014 - The question. What is the spectrum of gluten related disorders? “Experience is that marvelous thing that enables you to recognize a mistake when you make it again” – Franklin P Jones. The chilling news is that gluten-harm reaches far beyond the concept of celiac disease. Gluten has now been recognized to cause a widespread spectrum of illness, over and above celiac disease. The two questions to answer in this context are: How many other diseases does gluten cause? How many people are adversely affected by gluten over their lifetime? Last century, gluten-illness was synonymous with celiac disease. But, by the turn on the millennium, this concept radically changed. It was discovered that gluten intolerance was not limited to celiac disease. Disturbingly, celiac disease is only just the beginning of the scourge of gluten. Most people with any of these symptoms will not have celiac disease, but are likely to have an illness caused by gluten-harm. A gluten-related disorder. A Typical Story Heidi, in her blog, writes about her life-long struggle to get a meaningful diagnosis for herself and for her family. She says that testing for celiac disease and gluten sensitivity should be the first diagnosis to think about—not the last! http://www.adventuresofaglutenfreemom.com/2011/05/dermatitis-herpetiformis-and-other-atypical-symptoms-of-gluten-sensitivity/. Heidi says: “I also believe that the “atypical” symptoms are one of the major reasons why 95% of the estimated 3 million Americans living with celiac disease are undiagnosed. Add to that, the fact that you can go into any medical specialist’s office in this country and no doubt find patients whose underlying health problem is gluten, whether in the form of celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity. If doctors would stop being so eager to treat any of the 300+ signs, symptoms and conditions caused by gluten sensitivity (often with dangerous medications that will only perpetuate the problem), and take the time to practice medicine by seeking out the underlying root cause of the symptom, what a different world it could be!” The Gluten Syndrome The eating of gluten-grains is definitely associated with a lot of other serious illnesses. Collectively, I call this “The Gluten Syndrome”. This includes: Brain and nerve damage Auto immune disease Mental illness Skin disease Gastroenterological disorders A number of names are now in use for identifying gluten-related illnesses. These include: Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) Gluten intolerance Gluten sensitivity Gluten Syndrome Gluten-related disorders Gluten-related disorders diseases are being indentified by more and more research groups. The realization of this widespread gluten-harm is so recent that adequate clinical studies have yet to be done. Therefore, the true extent of the problem remains unknown, although meaningful estimates can be calculated. The Spectrum of Gluten-related Disorders With the publication of a landmark paper of “Spectrum of gluten-related disorders (http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1741-7015-10-13.pdf), perhaps it is time for the Health Guidelines (or medical protocols) of celiac disease and gluten sensitivity to be revised. There have been many developments over the last few years: the diagnosis of gluten sensitivity has come of age. The concept of gluten-related-disorders has gathered momentum with a number of converging influences: the boundary between celiac disease and gluten sensitivity has become blurred; the “gold-standard” small bowel biopsy for the tissue diagnosis of celiac disease is no longer regarded as mandatory; there has been recognition of a wide range of gluten-related disorders without intestinal damage; the extensive neurological effects of gluten have been well documented; and there has been a widespread adoption of gluten-free diets and lifestyle in the community. Here is the background of these statements: a) Spectrum of gluten-related disorders A group of 15 international celiac experts, who up until a few years ago were skeptical of gluten causing any illness other than celiac disease, have now defined a much wider group of illnesses which they have called “gluten-related disorders”. This landmark paper “Spectrum of gluten-related disorders: consensus on new nomenclature and classification” places celiac disease in context of other gluten-illness. Celiac disease no longer dominates the gluten sensitive picture (Sapone et al. BMC Medicine 2012, 10:13, published 7 February 2012). http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1741-7015-10-13.pdf The abstract reads: “A decade ago celiac disease was considered extremely rare outside Europe and, therefore, was almost completely ignored by health care professionals. In only 10 years, key milestones have moved celiac disease from obscurity into the popular spotlight worldwide. Now we are observing another interesting phenomenon that is generating great confusion among health care professionals. The number of individuals embracing a gluten-free diet appears much higher than the projected number of celiac disease patients, fueling a global market of gluten-free products approaching the $2.5 billion in global sales in 2010. This trend is supported by the notion that along with celiac disease, other conditions related to the ingestion of gluten have emerged as health care concerns. This review will summarize our current knowledge about the three main forms of gluten reactions: allergic (wheat allergy) autoimmune (celiac disease, dermatitis herpetiformis, and gluten ataxia) possibly immune-mediated (gluten sensitivity)” Regarding gluten sensitivity, they say: “there are cases of gluten reactions in which neither allergic nor autoimmune mechanisms can be identified. These are generally defined as non-celiac GS or more simply, GS. Some individuals who experience distress when eating gluten-containing products and show improvement when following a GFD may have GS instead of celiac disease. GS is a condition distinct from celiac disease and is not accompanied by the concurrence of anti-tTG autoantibodies or other autoimmune comorbidities.” They go on to say: “the two conditions cannot be distinguished clinically, since the symptoms experienced by GS patients are often seen in celiac disease … their symptoms included: abdominal pain (68%) eczema and/or rash (40% headache (35%) ‘foggy mind’ (34%) fatigue (33%) diarrhea (33%) depression (22%) anemia (20%) numbness in the legs, arms or fingers 20% joint pain (11%).” They conclude: “All individuals, even those with a low degree of risk, are therefore susceptible to some form of gluten reaction during their life span. Therefore, it is not surprising that during the past 50 years we have witnessed an ‘epidemic’ of celiac disease and the surging of new gluten-related disorders, including the most recently described GS.” No definitive test yet for gluten sensitivity Unfortunately, there is no accurate or reliable test for gluten sensitivity. However, the IgG-gliadin antibody (also know as AGA, anti-gliadin antibody) has been widely used as the best-available-marker, particularly in the identification of neurological and psychiatric gluten-disorders. Between 40-50% of gluten sensitivity patients may have IgG or IgA anti-gliadin antibodies (AGA Sapone A et al. (2010). Differential mucosal IL-17 expression in two gliadin-induced disorders: gluten sensitivity and the autoimmune enteropathy celiac disease. International Archives of Allergy & Immunology; 152: 75-80 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19940509; Bizzaro N et al. (2010) Cutting edge issues in celiac disease and in gluten intolerance. Clinical Reviews in Allergy & immunology http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21181303. Therefore, if the IgG-gliadin antibody is not elevated, this cannot rule out a diagnosis of gluten sensitivity. But, if elevated it can contribute to the diagnosis. Research laboratories are actively seeking specific test. Until such a test is available, elimination and challenge with gluten remains the most effective option. c) gluten sensitivity a common illness Dr. Fasano estimates that 6% of the population has gluten sensitivity, compared to 1% with celiac disease. http://celiacdisease.about.com/b/2011/03/11/u-of-md-study-identifies-differences-between-celiac-gluten-sensitivity.htm. Gluten sensitive now has its own Wikipedia page (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gluten_sensitivity#cite_ref-2) which also cites this figure. The problem of estimating the incidence of gluten-related-disorders is that there is not yet a diagnostic test. Current estimates are likely to be conservative. It is now known that no one can successfully digest gluten, and that we all have the potential to get unwell from gluten, and that it can cause illness in many different ways. Celiac disease has increased five-fold over the last 40 years, (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20868314) and it is likely that gluten sensitivity has increased at the same rate. d) Change of diagnostic guidelines for celiac disease No longer is small bowel biopsy necessary for a diagnosis of celiac disease. In certain cases, serology is now sufficient for the diagnosis of celiac disease. This has been discussed for the last 10 years as blood tests have been developed to accurately detect gut damage (EMA, tTG and DGP). Added to this is the genetics that can identify those people who can sustain intestinal damage with gluten (who carry the HLA DQ2/DQ8 alleles). Finally, the endoscopy is expensive and unreliable for the diagnosis of celiac disease. With the rapid increase in the incidence of celiac disease, it is impractical to demand tissue diagnosis for the millions of celiac disease sufferers. ESPGHAN (European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition) has new guidelines for the diagnosis of celiac disease http://www.phadia.com/Laboratories/Autoimmunity/Resources/PoM/2012/No-1-2012/ They conclude: “The diagnosis of celiac disease depends on gluten-dependent symptoms, celiac disease-specific antibodies, the presence of HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8, and characteristic histological changes in the duodenal biopsy. In case of high antibody levels the diagnosis of celiac disease may be based on a combination of symptoms, antibodies, and HLA, thus omitting the duodenal biopsy.” Their key message is: with high tissue damage markers (tTG IgA, EMA or DGP), in genetically susceptible people, celiac disease can be diagnosed without performing a duodenal biopsy. e) Gluten can harm brains and nerves Evidence shows that gluten does significantly affect the brain and nerves: gluten damage is not restricted to the gut. This is elegantly documented by Marios Hadjivassiliou (Gluten sensitivity: from gut to brain. The Lancet Neurology, Volume 9, Issue 3, Pages 318 - 330, March 2010), http://www.thelancet.com/journals/laneur/article/PIIS1474-4422(09)70290-X/abstract They write: “Gluten sensitivity is a systemic autoimmune disease with diverse manifestations ... celiac disease, or gluten-sensitive enteropathy, is only one aspect of a range of possible manifestations of gluten sensitivity … gluten sensitivity was shown to manifest solely with neurological dysfunction.” They conclude: “To improve diagnosis rates, the perception of physicians that gluten sensitivity is solely a disease of the gut must be changed.” f) Double blind studies The term “gluten sensitivity” was first used by Prof W Dicke the discoverer of gluten-related-disorders in his 1950 MD Thesis. He worked out that gluten was the culprit causing the illness (diarrhea, poor growth and irritability). He made his diagnosis clinically by elimination and challenge (not double blind), and with no blood tests or biopsy. He said “in the clinic, one finds many sub-acute forms of enteritis and dyspepsia which respond poorly to normal therapy but well to wheat deprivation.” In the 1960s, with the instigation of the small bowel biopsy, the whole perspective of diagnosis became focused exclusively on the gut. Celiac disease became a strictly gastrointestinal illness. This focus became so intense that it led to the un-substantiated dogma that: gluten only caused celiac disease … and if the patient had a normal small bowel biopsy, then gluten could not be causing any harm. This has now been shown to be a false doctrine. Currently, as in Dicke’s day, to establish if someone is gluten-sensitive, still relies a clinical trial of elimination and challenge. However, not unreasonably, there is a call for double-blind studies to establish the place of gluten-related disorders outside the framework of celiac disease. For instance, in IBS patients, who stated that they were gluten-free from self-diagnosis (and who had celiac disease excluded), were randomized to either gluten or placebo treatment groups. The finding was that symptom-severity-scores (of pain, stool consistency and tiredness) were significantly higher for gluten-eaters compared to the placebo-gluten-free group (Biesiekierski JR, Newnham ED, Irving PM, Barrett JS, Haines M, Doecke JD, Shepherd SJ, Muir JG, Gibson PR: Gluten causes gastrointestinal symptoms in subjects without celiac disease: a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial. Am J Gastroenterol 2011, 106:508-514. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21224837. g) 10% already going gluten-free Over the last few years there has been a widespread adoption of a gluten-free diet in the community. Peter Gibson, professor of medicine at Monash University’s Eastern Health Clinical School, estimates that in Australia, up to 10 per cent of people who are avoiding gluten because they think gluten is their problem http://www.gesa.org.au/media.asp?cid=5&id=153. However, until there is a reliable way to make the diagnosis, it will remain difficult to quantify the problem. Gibson plans to investigate the prevalence of non-celiac gluten intolerance, why it occurs and whether low levels of gluten can be eaten safely. http://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/diet-and-fitness/gluten-intolerance-possible-without-celiac-disease-study-finds-20110117-19u5b.html In America, the adoption of gluten-free diets is also increasingly common. This can be measured by the sales of gluten-free products, which have a compound annual growth rate of 28% from 2004 to 2011. For the year ending 2012, the sales of gluten-free products were up 19%. Also, nearly 20% of the population are actually buying.Gluten-free products, for whatever the reason. Conclusion Gluten was first implicated as causing disease 62 years ago by W Dicke. Initially, it was considered a rare disease affecting only the gastrointestinal tract. But now gluten has been recognized to cause a wide spectrum of illnesses, with a number of different pathological and physiological mechanisms. Celiac disease is becoming much more common, and gluten-related disorders are thought to affect at least 10% of the total community (and obviously it therefore affects a much higher proportion of the unwell-community). Surely it is time for gluten-related-disorders to be part of the medical main-stream differential diagnosis. This is a chapter from Dr Rodney Ford’s new book “Gluten: ZERO Global” which is available as an ebook at http://www.glutenZEROglobal.com
  2. Celiac.com 06/17/2017 - Hello, my name is Gerry. I am a certified Medical Technologist currently working as a Clinical Systems Analyst. I was diagnosed with celiac disease in 2006 by blood/biopsy. I have two wonderful children, 1 of whom has screened positive for a celiac gene pair. My strong background in Medical Technology assured a quick diagnosis once symptoms appeared. Since then, I have been living a strict gluten-free life. I have gone through nutritional counseling at Mayo Clinic and have an enhanced background with my understanding of the world of gluten. I use my experience and knowledge to accurately base my decisions on whether a product is safe for me. To prove my diet to be effective, I have had my TTG levels measured every 6 months since 2006—all were negative. Also, I have had 3 biopsies after beginning my gluten-free life and all were negative for villous atrophy. I do understand that my medical follow-ups do not prove that I am not ingesting small amounts of gluten; they simply indicate that I am not reacting. As for me, I view the gluten-free life to be much simpler and cheaper than it once was, and fear that strict gluten labeling guidelines have the potential to negatively shape the gluten-free life that I know and live today. Within the last few years, I have been receiving emails to ask my support regarding the FDA's gluten-free labeling rule. At first, I was a supporter as I wanted to support the celiac community since I was part of it. However, after I sat down and really thought about it, I am questioning the benefits of a strict gluten labeling act. In fact, I am predicting a negative impact if gluten labeling guidelines are too strict. When I started my gluten-free life in 2006, my grocery bill was atrocious. I was paying very high prices for the simplest of things. Tortilla chips $3.89 for a 6 oz bag. $3.99 for 8 oz of mustard. $5.99 for gluten-free mayonnaise. As the years moved on I noticed two changes that positively impacted my life as a celiac. The first is that many manufacturers have a list of their gluten-free products on their website along with explanations of how their company handles gluten. The second is the fact that many generic/in-store-brand companies are now labeling their products as "Gluten Free" or "Naturally Gluten free". Because of these two advancements, my life is so much easier and much more cost effective. This makes it easy to stick with my diet and keep my health safe and spirits up. Currently, if a product is made without gluten, it can be labeled as "gluten-free". Many products are available at a fraction of the cost and they are safe. Now that my family eats gluten-free, I have noticed that in today's world my grocery bill seems much more normal and realistic: gluten-free mustard $1.29; gluten-free mayonnaise $1.59;20 oz bags of tortilla chips labeled gluten-free $2.59; 8 oz bag of gluten-free cheese $1.99. You see, living a gluten-free life with today's rules is easy and I believe it to be safe if we are careful and make educated decisions. At this time we have many inexpensive non-brand/in-store brand name products that are widely available. I know of some stores that have 20+ pages of gluten-free items on an excel spreadsheet for their own brand of products, including medications. There are stores that update these lists quarterly, and most are listed by bar-code number. I can simply print the list and buy all of my products safely and inexpensively. I could easily make a phone call to clarify items that I may disagree with, or inquire about cross-contamination. Are these products that I speak of above tested for gluten? I don't believe so. Are these products free of gluten ingredients? I trust that they are. Is there cross-contamination? Maybe. It is easy for me to call and ask about their product lines. Are these products safe for me? I believe so, as I have the blood tests to prove they have been safe for me. Phone calls to companies on products that are not labeled as "gluten-free" are still the norm even though they are getting less frequent. As an expert, I am able to screen who I am talking to and the company's knowledge about gluten. I have been able to make accurate judgments on these products as well as deciding whether I believe them to be safe. In many of the cases, the company claimed their product to be free of gluten and I felt comfortable consuming the product. Yes, there were companies that didn't have acceptable knowledge/quality control and I didn't feel these products were safe so I didn't consume them. My first question to the celiac community is this. Do we need a strict gluten-free labeling act when we already have companies testing for gluten and providing safe products? If we want our products batch tested for gluten, we can simply purchase the ones that are currently available as there are many. If we want to know the threshold that the company considers as gluten-free, we can call them and they will tell us. Are there currently batch tested gluten-free products on the market? Absolutely. Many companies state on their packaging that they have been tested to under 20 or 40 ppm. If a company is testing, they make it known on the label and in the price of the product. My next question is what will a strict gluten-free labeling act do for us? I believe that it will ensure that a product is safe for celiac patients defining what a product needs to be in order to be labeled as gluten-free. Simple-yes. How do we suppose a company is going to know if their product is gluten-free? Well, if you ask me, it will NEED to be tested. Who will pay for this testing? I believe that the celiac community (the consumers) will be paying for this in higher food prices. If a company has to test a product to label it gluten-free, the price will need to go up in order to pay the cost of the testing and the quality control program for the company. We know this to be true as these products are already accessible. I see a possible negative impact of this labeling act if it were to be made too strict. I believe that manufacturers that do not test for gluten may need to pull their "gluten-free" labeling from the package. This could eliminate most of the inexpensive safe products that I currently purchase today. We know there are many manufacturers out there that label products as gluten-free as they simply do not use gluten ingredients. I believe these products may recede. I am not so sure a company will be able to label these products as gluten-free without first testing them. Even if they are allowed, I am not so sure they will take the risk. Therefore negatively impacting our pricing/availability. Will Gluten free lists on websites go away too? I believe these could fade or be at risk as well. If there is a law/act that dictates the amount of gluten in a product, I would think that a company would not create gluten-free lists of products without proving them to be gluten-free by some form of testing in an attempt to avoid legal action against them. What about our phone calls to companies asking if their products are gluten-free? Will they have a gluten-free list to review? I would tend to think that they may not be provided with a gluten-free list to reference. I have a hunch they may say, "We do not test any of our products for gluten and therefore are unable to tell you whether the product is gluten-free". I know that reply will complicate my life in many ways. The first thing that comes to my mind, in this regard, are the calls to pharmaceutical companies regarding medications. I feel that there are better ways to change the labeling as we know it that would offer a more positive effect on the celiac community. Maybe just changing the package labeling to force companies to list wheat, oats, rye, and barley on the packaging. How about requiring mandatory labeling of products that share lines with "gluten" containing ingredients? When we look at the big picture, I think it is safe to theorize that the impact of strict gluten labeling guidelines goes far beyond just providing safe products. In conclusion, I ask these questions. Will a strict gluten labeling act have the potential to negatively impact the celiac community by increasing prices and decreasing availability? And lastly, have we looked at the possible outcomes from all angles?
  3. Celiac.com 01/02/2017 - New research shows that a group of proteins in wheat, called ATIs, may be responsible for activating inflammation in such disorders as celiac disease, multiple sclerosis, asthma, and rheumatoid arthritis. Scientists also believe that the proteins may promote the development of non-celiac gluten sensitivity. The findings were presented at UEG Week 2016 in Vienna in Vienna, Austria, a meeting organized by United European Gastroenterology for specialists to communicate the latest research in digestive and liver diseases. One group of proteins found in wheat - amylase-trypsin inhibitors (ATIs) - has been shown to trigger an immune response in the gut that can spread to other tissues in the body. ATIs are plant-derived proteins that inhibit enzymes of common parasites - such as mealworms and mealybugs - in wheat. Interestingly, ATIs also have an important role in metabolic processes that occur during seed development. The finding that ATIs may promote inflammation in the and beyond the gut, is a major step forward in understanding the mechanics of celiac disease and/or gluten-intolerance. Stay tuned for more news on this and other breaking stories in celiac disease research. Read more at MedicalNewsToday.com.
  4. Celiac.com 11/16/2012 - Many of the increasing number of folks who suffer from celiac disease and/or gluten-intolerance also happen to love beer. So, what to do? For those who are loathe to give up on one of their favorite beverages, there are a number of delicious, gluten-free alternatives that will help to keep the smiles coming. For those who prefer cider over beer, we've also included a list of some mighty tasty, gluten-free ciders to warm you on the dark nights ahead. Here is a partial list of gluten-free beers and ciders that will take even the most discerning gluten-free beer drinker through the holiday season and beyond: Gluten-free Beers Harvester Brewing Dark Ale Harvester Brewing is a dedicated gluten-free brewery founded by James Neumeister in 2011, after his wife was diagnosed with celiac disease. Harvester's website says that every beer that they make is gluten-free, and "made in our brewery where no gluten containing items are allowed through the door." In place of wheat and/or barley, Neumeister uses chestnuts, which he roasts and brews specifically for each product Harvester makes. Harvester's Dark Ale uses a very dark, near espresso-like, roasted chestnuts, which yields a brew that has hints of chocolate, coffee, dark fruits, and a rich chestnut finish. Brunehaut Bio Amber Brunehaut's hefty, certified-organic amber ale uses de-glutenized barley to produce a rich, copper colored brew with a beige head, and notes of caramel and fresh bread with hoppy accents of pine and citrus, along with hints of vanilla, toffee, butterscotch and ripe fruit. Alcohol is 6.5% by volume. Estrella Damm Daura In 2011, Estrella Damm's gluten-free Daura fended off entries from all over the globe to win Gold Medals at the World Beer Championships and the International Beer Challenge, and won the World’s Best Gluten-free Lager Award at the World Beer Awards. Gluten-free beer drinkers consistently report that Daura is one of the best beers they have tasted. The beer has limited distribution in the US, and, for many gluten-free beer drinkers, finding it can be like finding the Holy Chalice. Here's a handy link to help you find Estrella Damm Daura in your area. Green’s Quest Gluten Free Tripel Blonde Ale For those who prefer Trappist style ales, but can't have the traditional malted barley, the folks at Green's use millet, sorghum, buckwheat, and rice, to brew a refermented tripel blonde ale that offers an herby, yeasty aroma, with hints of pear and apple, spice, and flavors of candied fruit. Alcohol is 8.5% by volume. Green's Endeavour Dubbel Ale Green's Endeavour is brewed in the classic dubbel fashion. The result is a brew that offers hints of dark-sugar and toffee flavor with a traditional Belgian yeast bouquet. Alcohol is 7.0% by volume. Green’s Discovery Amber Ale Green’s Discovery is a medium-bodied amber ale with subtle caramel and nut flavors, and a refined, herbal hop bouquet and finish. Alcohol is 6.0% by volume. Since 2004, Green's beers have been brewed in Lochristi, Belgium at the highly-regarded DeProef Brewery. Inspired by tasty, full-bodied European beers and developed to a closely guarded secret recipe, these strong beers offer a crisp taste and a refreshing flavor, while eliminating allergens. Because they are bottle-conditioned with genuine Belgian yeast, all of Green's Beers have a full five-year shelf life. According to Green's website, the characteristic tastes and aromas of their beers result from the specially selected de-glutenised barley malt and hop varieties and are brewed to age old recipes. New Planet Tread Lightly Ale For their gluten-free Tread Lightly Ale, New Planet uses sorghum, corn extract, orange peel, hops, and yeast to brew a refreshing, light bodied beer without the aftertaste of many sorghum-based beers. New Planet Off Grid Pale Ale For their Gluten-free Off Grid Pale Ale, New Planet uses sorghum and brown rice extract, molasses, tapioca maltodextrin, caramel color, hops, and yeast to produce a classically styled pale ale with a distinctly deep amber color and great character and body. Three varieties of hops impart a delightful citrus aroma and a spicy hop flavor. Omission Gluten-Free Lager, Omission uses aromatic hops to brew a refreshing and crisp beer in the traditional lager style. Alcohol is 4.6% by volume. Omission Gluten-Free Pale AleBold and hoppy, Omission Pale Ale is a hop-forward American Pale Ale, brewed to showcase the Cascade hop profile. Amber in color, Omission Pale Ale’s floral aroma is complimented by caramel malt body. Alcohol is 5.8% by volume. Their website states that, before shipping, Omission tests gluten levels in every batch both at the brewery, and at an independent lab, using the R5 Competitive ELISA gluten test, to ensure that the beers measure well below the Codex gluten-free standard of 20 ppm or less. Sprecher Shakparo Ale Sprecher's gluten free Shakparo Ale is a West African Shakparo-style beer brewed from sorghum and millet. An unfiltered, light, crisp ale with a cider or fruit highlights and a dry aftertaste. For the more adventurous, Sprecher also brews Mbege Ale, which is an unfiltered ale brewed with bananas, yes, bananas, in the African style. Light hints of banana remain present in the aroma and flavor of this unique offering. Steadfast Sorghum Pale Ale Steadfast brewery uses Cascade-and Columbus hops and White sorghum syrup and molasses to brew their golden amber, Indian/American-style Steadfast Sorghum Pale Ale. Alcohol is 6.8% by volume. Gluten-free Ciders Crispin Browns Lane Browns Lane by Crispin is a lightly sparking, crisply effervescent cider made with traditional English bittersweet cider apples sourced in the Malvern Hills of Worcestershire. The result is a rich cider with a dark straw color, and an aroma that evokes an almost traditional farmhouse cider bouquet. Soft, subtle natural apple sweetness up front, with a slightly dry, woody, lingering finish. Crispin Original Cider Crispin Super Premium Hard Apple Cider is naturally fermented using fresh pressed apple-juice, not apple-juice concentrate, from a premium blend of US West Coast apples, with no added malt, grape-wine, or spirit alcohol. The crisp flavor of Crispin is polished with pure apple juice, with no added sugar, colorants or sorbate or benzoate preservatives and cold filtered for crisp refreshment. Strongbow Cider Strongbow uses a traditional English recipe to brew a crisp, refreshing premium cider. Magners Cider Magners uses 17 varieties of apples and ferments their cider up to two years to deliver a full-bodied, well-rounded traditional cider.
  5. Beyond Celiac is a non-profit organization dedicated to: Through empowerment, education and advocacy, the Beyond Celiac drives diagnoses of celiac disease and other gluten-related disorders and improves the quality of life for those on a lifelong gluten-free diet. Beyond Celiac P.O. Box 544 Ambler, PA 19002 215-325-1306 215-283-0859 (fax) www.BeyondCeliac.org info@CeliacCentral.org
  6. There is a great, not to mention free e-book called, “Beyond Your Gluten Free Diet." I find the information in this book to be very helpful for anyone who has just been diagnosed as well as to those that have been diagnosed for many years. This book sums it up perfectly when it says, “a gluten free diet should be only the beginning of your treatment.” I couldn't agree more! This books gives advice as to how to remain social, the best nutritional choices, how to supplement your gluten-free diet and much more. It's definitely worth checking out...after all, it is free! For more info visit: http://www.celiact.com/beyondthegfd Note:Articles thatappearin the "Gluten-Free Food & SpecialtyProduct Companies" section ofthis site are paid advertisements. Formoreinformation about this seeour AdvertisingPage.
  7. Celiac.com 04/11/2011 - After years of being relegated to the specialty foods category, gluten-free foods have gone mainstream. Since 2005, sales of gluten-free products have more than doubled, and the number of new gluten-free goods is expanding rapidly. Rockville, Md.-based research firm Packaged Facts, calculates that U.S. retail sales of gluten-free products rose from just under 1 billion dollars in 2006 to $2.3-billion dollars in 2010. The firm's 2011 Gluten Free Foods and Beverages report projects those sales to to top $2.6 billion dollars by 2012, and to nearly double to $5.5-billion by 2015. A similar trend is under way in Canada, although precise national figures are not available. Recently, cereal giant General Mills transformed its popular Rice Chex cereal into a gluten-free product without any change to the taste, simply by substituting molasses for barley-based sweetener. General Mills also acquired the Larabar brand of gluten free nutrition bars with an eye toward expanding that brand. As of November 2010, General Mills claims to offer 250 gluten-free products, including five varieties of Chex and numerous products under the venerable Betty Crocker and Bisquick brands. As vastly more people buy gluten-free foods as part of a healthier lifestyle choice, rather than just to address celiac disease or dietary intolerances, those products are no longer "regarded as a niche product that was only of interest to people who couldn’t tolerate wheat, gluten-free foods and beverages." Rather, this newfound interest beyond the traditional gluten-free market has quickly transformed gluten-free products into what Packaged Facts calls a "mainstream sensation, embraced by consumers both out of necessity and as a personal choice toward achieving a healthier way to live." While many market researchers looking into the growth of the gluten free market have speculated that under-diagnosis of celiac disease is a major driver, Packaged Facts found that this may not be the case. Packaged Facts conducted a online nationwide survey of 1,881 adults in fall 2010, including 277 consumers of gluten free products. Survey results showed that nearly half of people (46%) who buy gluten-free foods and beverages did so based on a perception that they are ‘generally healthier’. Thirty percent of gluten free consumers said they did so in an effort to manage their weight and 22 percent said they thought gluten free products were ‘generally higher quality’. Only about ten percent of gluten free consumers said they bought gluten free products because they or a member of their household has celiac disease or an intolerance to gluten, wheat or other ingredients. “Interestingly, 13 percent buy gluten free foods to treat other conditions that may or may not be associated with diet,” the report notes. Packaged Facts also found that food manufacturers are blending more ancient grains, such as quinoa and amaranth into their gluten free products, whites increases nutrition, and may enhance flavor. “Enrichment and fortification are smart marketing under just about any circumstances, but for gluten-free foods it’s a more critical issue, as gluten-free diets are often lacking in essential nutrients,” the report said. Further reading: http://www.prlog.org/11268541-gluten-free-foods-and-beverages-become-mainstream-sensations-as-part-of-healthy-lifestyle-choice.html http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/food-and-wine/gluten-free-has-gone-mainstream-but-how-long-will-that-last/article1890365/
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