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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes

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Found 15 results

  1. Celiac.com 06/10/2017 - Grilling season is nearly upon us once again, and once again, the call of cooking outside begins to beckon. While there's no dearth of good things to throw on the grill, this recipe for grilled garlic prawns with black pepper is a great place to start. Ingredients: 1 pound large prawns, peeled, deveined 2 teaspoons paprika, plus more for garnish 3 garlic cloves, minced 1 tablespoon coarsely ground pepper 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice 2 tablespoons vegetable oil, plus more for grill Kosher salt Lime wedges and paprika as garnish Preparation: Whisk paprika, garlic, pepper, lime juice, and 2 tablespoons oil in a large bowl. Add prawns and toss until well-coated. Add salt and mix a bit more. Skewer 5-6 shrimp at a time onto double skewers, until all shrimp are ready to grill. Prepare a grill for medium-high heat; clean grates well, then oil the grill lightly. Grill prawns, turning once, until cooked through and lightly charred, about 2-3 minutes each side. Serve with lime wedges and paprika.
  2. Celiac.com 04/20/2016 - I am likely to be accused of gluten heresy. That is because I propose that celiac disease and gluten sensitivity usually coexist. By this I mean that they are not mutually exclusive entities. In other words, most people who have celiac disease are also gluten-sensitive. Many people who are gluten-sensitive are likely to develop celiac disease with continued gluten exposure (depending on their genetic markers). My observations show that the distinction between celiac disease and gluten-sensitivity (the gluten syndrome) is blurred. The purpose of published algorithms and decision trees are designed to separate out celiac disease from other gluten-illnesses. I suggest that this thinking is flawed. For example, most flow charts go something like this: (See Flow Chart 1 at left). People are selected for celiac-blood-tests for a number of reasons. If your blood tests are positive (and usually if you carry a DQ2/8 gene), then you get an endoscopy to confirm/deny the diagnosis. This allows you to be categorized either Yes-celiac disease or Not-celiac disease. There is no overlap. This is an "us-and-them" scenario. However, isolating YES-celiac disease from every other gluten problem does not take into account that people who have gluten-gut-damage may well have other manifestations of gluten-related disorders. Such simplistic algorithms (decision trees) strike problems at every decision point. Such as: Who should be tested? Who should be re-tested? When should these tests be done? At what age? On how much gluten? What tests should be done? What are the cut-off levels? How important is carrying the DQ2/8 genes? What about sero-negative celiac disease? How accurate are endoscopic biopsies? Who interprets the Marsh scale? How long should a gluten challenge be? Such simplistic algorithms (decision trees) also do not give satisfactory answers to the following questions: Why do 10% of people with celiac disease have little or no symptoms, despite having severe small bowel damage (villous atrophy)? This group is called "asymptomatic" celiac disease. Villous atrophy alone cannot account for the majority of gluten-related symptoms. Why do half of the people with celiac disease have autonomic nervous system dysfunction? This is the disturbance of the automatic nerve activity of your internal organs. This cannot be directly attributed to villous atrophy. Why do most people with celiac disease have some brain/mental upset, including the pervasive brain-fog? Many people have neurological disease from gluten but do not have established celiac disease. How can so many "extra-intestinal manifestations" of celiac disease be attributed to intestinal gut damage alone? I am sure that you will have witnessed strong feelings from the defenders of 'celiac-disease-is-a-stand-alone illness'. For instance, read these two opposing comments from Facebook: A. "I find it hard to believe that gluten intolerant people (or gluten avoiders) are as strict as us who have celiac disease." B. "I am gluten intolerant (suspected Celiac but I refuse to eat gluten in order to be tested properly) … I am incredibly strict on what I eat." The world of gluten is not black and white! But there remains a tension between those who have "biopsy-proven" celiac disease, and those people who are "gluten-intolerant". However, there is a cross-over between gluten-sensitivity/intolerance and celiac disease. There is no sharp dividing line – there is lots of grey! I would like to see the support groups of both celiac disease and gluten sensitivity work together with a focus on their common ground. This is already happening in some countries. Both groups promote an accurate diagnosis and a strict gluten-free diet. But I call into question the accuracy of current diagnostic methodology. Another comment from Facebook is a good example of these blurred lines: "I had an endoscopy and I have some small intestine damage: increased intraepithelial lymphocytes, shortened villi and duodenitis. The gastroenterologist said I had gluten-sensitivity but because I was not celiac (wasn't Marsh stage 3a), he said that I didn't need to be quite as careful with gluten. But I know I am super sensitive - even a small piece of chocolate with gluten in it makes me sick for a few weeks. I suspect that I either didn't have enough gluten before the endoscopy, or I am in the early stages of developing it." This is what I conclude: Both groups (people with celiac disease, and people with gluten sensitivity/intolerance) come under the umbrella category of gluten-related disorders. The term non-celiac gluten-sensitivity (NCGS) excludes those with evidence of intestinal damage from gluten. But with time and continued gluten ingestion, some of these people will develop celiac disease. NCGS is part of the gluten-related disorders spectrum (see my book: www.glutenrelateddisorder.com). Both groups have an identical list of possible symptoms. They are both equally harmed by gluten. They are indistinguishable from each other without blood tests and/or endoscopy. For both groups, my recommendation is to be zero gluten. Avoidance of cross-contamination is crucial for everyone. Both groups can be exquisitely sensitive to gluten. Some celiacs experience no symptoms from gluten, making it more of a challenge for them to remain gluten-zero. Some gluten-sensitive people do not yet have overt symptoms but are developing an inflammatory state. Many people who are gluten-sensitive produce antibodies to gluten, AGA (anti-gliadin-antibodies). There is a large literature on this. AGA-positive people are more likely to develop gluten-illnesses. AGA tests are recommended in the Fasano paper the "spectrum of gluten related disorders", for the celiac and gluten sensitivity work-up (particularly for neurological disorders). I use them on a day-to-day basis in my Clinic, and so do many other practitioners. More wheat/gluten harmful proteins have yet to be identified. Early in the development of celiac disease, the person can have significant symptoms, and they may have elevated AGA antibodies, but they may have no evidence yet of intestinal damage. At this stage these two conditions are indistinguishable. How early can you diagnose celiac disease? Do you have to wait until there is substantial intestinal damage so that you can make the classic diagnosis with villous atrophy? Or do you keep on eating gluten until the damage has occurred? Or do you go strictly gluten zero and not know if you are gluten sensitive or have early celiac disease? The HLA gene (DQ2/DQ8) cannot be used as a casting vote. It is my recommendation to abandon gluten as early as possible and not wait until you have substantial intestinal damage, which may never heal. Not only is the gluten intolerant community (this includes celiac disease) confused about gluten-illness. Also, the medical fraternity is confused. The science and clinical issues are rapidly developing whilst most medical practitioners are still looking for the classic celiac with weight loss, malabsorption, and a bloated tummy (and are using an out-of-date simplistic algorithm). Many people request celiac tests of their GPs but are denied the test. The community is much more aware of gluten related disorder than medical practitioners. Yes, there are a lot of issues to think about. These gluten-illnesses are complicated to diagnose. My prediction is that increasing numbers of people will adopt a gluten zero diet. However, almost certainly it is much more than the substance gluten that is making us sick. It will take a long time to unravel all of these strings. Most people are after an easy answer, or a drug, or a vaccine. But I'm sure that it is going to become even more complicated as we learn more. These complexities do not show up in a simplistic algorithm. The way for an individual to solve this is to adopt a gluten-zero diet, lifelong.
  3. Celiac.com 03/24/2016 - Good black bean soup is a tasty treat on a rainy day. Since we've had a few rainy days lately, I recommend this recipe for a smoky, spicy, flavor-packed southwestern-style vegetarian black bean soup that is a perfect hearty pick for cold, blustery days. Ingredients: 1 can black beans 1 can refried black beans 2 cups vegetable broth 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 medium onion, chopped 1 green bell pepper, seeded and chopped 1 tablespoon chopped chipotle in adobo sauce 1 tablespoon dried epazote (aka Mexican tea), chopped 1 avocado ½ cup refrigerated fresh salsa ¼ cup sour cream or plain yogurt fresh cilantro kosher salt pepper Directions: Heat the oil in a large stock pot over medium heat. Add the onion and green pepper, season with ¼ teaspoon each salt and pepper and cook, covered, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes. Stir in the chipotle and adobo. Stir in the beans, refried beans, epazote, and vegetable broth and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 20-30 minutes. Divide the soup into bowls, and top with the avocado, salsa, sour cream, and cilantro, if desired.
  4. Celiac.com 03/01/2016 - If you're looking for an easy, tasty way to serve fish is a great way to go. Now, for this dish, you're not looking for the black cod known as Chilean Sea Bass, but for the American version, usually caught in Alaska, that is much more sustainable. So, be sure to talk to your fishmonger if you're not sure. Ingredients: 1 pound Black cod fillets, cut into pieces 1 tablespoon Sugar 1 tablespoon White miso 1 tablespoon Mirin 1 tablespoon Sake 1 large clove garlic, grated 1/2" finger of ginger, grated 3 cloves garlic, minced Directions: Mix the sugar, miso, mirin, sake, garlic and ginger in a small bowl. Rub this mixture into the cod then cover and refrigerate overnight Move the oven rack to the second position from the top and turn the broiler onto the "high" setting. Scrape any extra miso off the fillets and place them on a rack on top of a baking sheet, skin side down. Put the pan under the broiler and broil until the cod is golden brown on the top side. Turn the fillets skin side up, and continue broiling until the skin is lightly charred and crisp. If you have thicker fillets, insert a fork into the thickest part of the fillet to see if it's cooked. Cook until the meat is opaque and come apart easily. Serve with rice and favorite vegetables.
  5. I've often wondered who it was that decided that nearly all toothpastes need so much mint flavor that you can't taste anything else but mint for hours after brushing? This has always been a pet peeve of mine with toothpastes, and I often avoid brushing my teeth before I plan to eat or drink anything that I actually want to be able to taste. SprinJene toothpaste does not fall into this trap. In fact, I was blown away by the mildness of the mint flavor in this premium toothpaste, and the excellent and unusually clean feeling that it left in my mouth for hours after using it. After reading more about this gluten-free toothpaste, I believe that the pleasant mouth feel was likely due to the black seed oil that it contains. Apparently black seed oil has been used for millennia for its antioxidant, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects, and black seed oil was even found in King Tut's tomb. SprinJene was developed by a scientist whose goal was to create a toothpaste that doesn't contain harsh chemicals or abrasives, but still cleans and whitens teeth, and protects tooth enamel. Thankfully SprinJene also saw the need to dial down the mint flavor when they were formulating this excellent toothpaste, so that I can actually taste things after brushing...and to that I say: Bravo! For more info visit: www.SprinJene.com.
  6. Just when I thought that nothing in the gluten-free realm of products could surprise me anymore, I was lucky enough to get in the mail a frozen Inspired by Happiness Gluten-Free Dreamin’ of Chocolate Black & White Chocolate Layer Cake, which led to one of the most wonderful gluten-free experiences that I've had in a long time! From the moment I laid eyes on this cake I was impressed. So much so that I decided to serve it for dessert at a friend's dinner party—even though I had never before tasted it. In the gluten-free world this can be a risky proposition—especially when most of the guests attending were not on a gluten-free diet. When dessert was finally served my friend was surprised to see a piece in front of me, because he assumed that it wasn't gluten-free (again, it just looked too good!). After he found out that it was gluten-free he seemed let down...but after one bite it was clear that this cake was beyond good—it was simply astonishing! As you can tell by the picture, this is a very rich chocolate cake. There are generous amounts of white and dark chocolate throughout, and the cake is incredibly moist and held together perfectly. It also wasn't too sweet tasting, which made the white and dark chocolate flavors really stand out. After this experience it is clear to me that Inspired by Happiness cakes are perfect for any special occasion, including dinner parties, birthdays and weddings. For more info visit: Inspired-By-Happiness.com
  7. Celiac.com 04/29/2015 - In addition to people with celiac disease, a number of people in the U.S. do not have celiac disease, but avoid gluten (PWAG). Researchers don't know much about racial disparities in the rates of celiac disease, and among those without celiac disease, but who avoid gluten. A team of researchers recently set out to investigate and describe racial differences in the prevalence of celiac disease and PWAG, and evaluate the trends of celiac disease in the non-institutionalized civilian adult population of the US between 1988 and 2012. The research team included Rok Seon Choung MD, PhD, Ivo C Ditah MD, MPhil, Ashley M Nadeau, Alberto Rubio-Tapia MD, Eric V Marietta MD, Tricia L Brantner, Michael J Camilleri MD, S Vincent Rajkumar MD, Ola Landgren MD, PhD, James E Everhart MD, MPH, and Joseph A Murray MD. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA, Department of Dermatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA, the Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA, the Myeloma Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, and with the Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA The team conducted a population-based cross-sectional study using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) from 1988 to 1994, 1999 to 2004, and 2009 to 2012. They tested serum samples from the NHANES participants for celiac serology, which included IgA tissue transglutaminase (tTG IgA), and then tested any abnormal findings for IgA endomysial antibodies. They used an interviewer-administered questionnaire to gather information about patient adherence to a gluten-free diet. Their review of NHANES 2009–2012 showed that adjusted rates of celiac disease were significantly higher (P<0.0001) in non-Hispanic whites (1.0%) than in non-Hispanic blacks (0.2%) and Hispanics (0.3%). Meanwhile, blacks showed a significantly higher adjusted prevalence of PWAG of 1.2% (P=0.01), compared with Hispanics at 0.5% and whites 0.7%. In adults aged 50 years and older, seroprevalence of celiac disease rose from 0.17% (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.03–0.33) in 1988–1994 to 0.44% (95% CI 0.24–0.81) in 2009–2012 (P<0.05). Overall rates of celiac disease increased from 1988 to 2012, which is much more common in white Americans than in black Americans. Interestingly, black Americans make up a higher proportion of individuals maintaining a gluten-free diet in the absence of a celiac disease diagnosis. It may be that celiac disease, or non-celiac gluten sensitivity, are more common in the black population that previously understood. Further study will undoubtedly shed some light on this issue. Source: Am J Gastroenterol 2015; 110:455–461; doi:10.1038/ajg.2015.8; published online 10 February 2015
  8. If you are looking for a great alternative to traditional snacks like chips and cookies, you should try these Gluten-Free Black Pepper With Roasted Peanuts Savory Rice Snacks by Kameda Crisps. They are light and crispy and have a bold delicious flavor like no other snack I have ever tried. The great taste can be attributed to the fact that these snacks are baked (not fried) and they do not contain any trans fats. A 5 oz. package will satisfy your urge for zest and crunch at the same time. For more information visit their site: www.kamedausa.com.
  9. 1 Tbsp. butter 1 tsp. cumin 1/2 cup chopped onions 1 Tbsp. crushed garlic 1 Tbsp. chili powder (optional) 1 can (14.5 oz.) diced tomatoes with crushed chili peppers (rinsed and drained) 1 can (15 oz.) black beans (rinsed and drained) 2 cups gluten free chicken broth 2 16-oz. cans pumpkin Fresh cilantro Sour cream or plain yogurt Fresh lime Heat the butter in a large pot over medium heat. Stir in the cumin, onions, garlic, and chili powder (if using) and cook 2-3 minutes. Add the tomatoes, and bring to a simmer. Partially cover the pot, and stir occasionally until slightly thickened (about 5 minutes). Stir in the black beans, chicken broth, and pumpkin. Simmer over medium high heat, for a few minutes. Then reduce the heat to low, and simmer, covered, for about 10 minutes or until thoroughly heated. Use an immersion blender to blend the soup until smooth. Or, transfer the soup to a blender, and blend in batches. Ladle into bowls, and garnish with the cilantro, sour cream or yogurt, and a squeeze of lime juice.
  10. Black beans are a healthy addition to any diet, and especially to a gluten-free diet. They are inexpensive and taste great. Gluten-Free and Vegetarian Serves 2 Ingredients 4 gluten-free tortillas 1/2 cup Greek plain 2% yogurt 1/2 cup pureed pumpkin 1/2 tsp. chili powder 1 cup white beans 1/4 cup fresh curly parsley, chopped 1 1/2 cups black beans, cooked 1 cup wild rice, cooked 1 ripe avocado, peeled, pitted and mashed 1 plum tomato, finely chopped 1/3 tsp. sea salt 1/4 tsp. freshly ground white pepper Directions Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Prepare a baking sheet with non-stick baking spray. Lay gluten-free tortillas flat on baking sheet. In a medium bowl, combine yogurt, pumpkin and chili powder; mix well to combine. Spread mixture atop tortillas. Add mashed avocado and smooth together in a circular motion. Add white beans, parsley, beans, rice and tomatoes. Sprinkle with sea salt and pepper. Transfer to the oven; bake for 1-15 minutes or until golden brown and bubbling. Remove from oven; transfer to serving dishes. Serve warm.
  11. A good stew will come together slowly—the savory aromatics building patiently, one upon another. This recipe falls in the 'rainy day' category, as the prep will likely keep you in the kitchen for a while. But of course, where else would you rather be when it rains? This dish combines a lot of powerful flavors that hold well against the beans. The citrus and cider vinegar offer fresh counterbalance to the various levels of spice. For a thicker consistency, cook for a few minutes longer before adding the orange juice. Ingredients: 2 cups black beans, soaked overnight ½ pound fresh spicy sausage, casing removed 3 tablespoons olive oil 1 green bell pepper, chopped 1 red bell pepper, chopped 2 shallots, minced 4 garlic cloves, minced 1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes ½ teaspoon ground cumin ½ teaspoon cardamom ¼ cup apple cider vinegar plus ¼ cup water 1 teaspoon orange zest Juice from ½ an orange 4 cups water Salt and pepper to taste Directions: Drain beans and transfer to a large soup pot with the water. Bring to a boil and then reduce heat to low and let simmer for about 1 ½ hours. Keep pot partially covered. Meanwhile, cook sausage in a medium skillet over medium-high heat, breaking up into chunks with a spoon. Remove after sausage is firm, 5-7 minutes and set aside. Keep the juices from the sausage and to the same skillet, add olive oil, shallots, peppers and garlic. Cook for about 7 minutes until vegetables are tender. Add red pepper flakes, cumin and cardamom and cook for another minute longer then remove from heat. Add vegetables to the pot of cooked beans and let simmer for an additional 20-30 minutes. Add the combination of vinegar and water, orange juice, zest and sausage. Allow flavors to mingle together for a few more minutes. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
  12. I recently tried Benitos gluten free Black Bean Chipotle BBQ Chips and boy was I impressed! These chips are free from gluten, corn, soy and potato. This is truly one of those products that seems too good to be true, and I would have never guessed that this great tasting chip is also low glycemic, high in fiber and omega 3's and packs 4 grams of protein for each serving! It reminded me of a corn chip without the corn, and the seasoning added an extra "sinful" flavor to the chip. Beanitos gluten free chips pack a great crunch and hold up beautifully to dipping. Visit their website at www.Beanitos.com.
  13. Ingredients: 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 2-3 cloves fresh garlic, thinly sliced 1 dried red chili, crushed 1 teaspoon minced fresh ginger 1 red onion, diced Sea salt 1 carrot, diced 1 cup butternut squash, diced Mirin (rice cooking wine) 1 cup fresh/frozen corn kernels (I used 1 can drained) 2 cups cooked black turtle beans (I used 1 can black beans drained) 5 cups spring or filtered water 2 scallions, thinly sliced on the diagonal, for garnish. 2 slices of bacon cut into small pieces (optional) Parmesan cheese (optional) 5 cups spring or filtered water (optional: substitute chicken broth for part of the water) Directions: Place oil, garlic, chili, ginger and onion in a soup pot and turn the heat to medium. When the onions begin to sizzle, add a pinch of salt and sauté for 2 minutes. Stir in carrot and squash, a pinch of salt and a generous sprinkle of Mirin. Sauté until just shiny with oil. Add corn and beans (optional: add bacon) and stir gently. Add water, cover and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low and cook for 30 minutes. Season to taste with salt and simmer for 5 minutes more. Serve garnished with fresh scallions (optional: sprinkle with Parmesan cheese). Makes 5-6 servings.
  14. 1 ¾ cup rice flour ¾ cup cocoa 1 teaspoon Baking powder 1 cup brewed black coffee ½ cup oil 1 teaspoon Vanilla 2 cups sugar 2 teaspoon Baking soda 1 teaspoon Salt 2 eggs 1 cup sour milk Add liquid ingredients to dry and beat at medium speed for 3 minutes. Bake in 9 x 13 pan for 45 to 50 minutes, or in 2 layer pans for 25 to 30 minutes. Notes: sour milk can be made by adding 1 teaspoon vinegar to 1 cup milk and letting it set for 5 minutes. Sift the dry ingredients, black coffee can be replaced with water if desired.
  15. This recipe comes to us from Betty Doubravsky. My wife entered this in the Dolores County Fair here in Colorado and won three ribbons. - James Pie Pastry: 1 ½ cup sifted gluten-free flour * ½ cup soy flour 2 teaspoons xanthan gum ¼ - ½ teaspoon salt 2/3 cup Crisco or other shortening 5-7 tablespoons COLD water (I use 7) Sift flours, xanthan and salt; cut in shortening until likeness of cornmeal; sprinkle in water and mix with a fork until dough forms a ball. Divide dough in half, rolling each half between sheets of wax paper until dough is about the thickness of 1/8 inch. Place into pie plate, fill with favorite gluten-free filling (fresh currants are not that easy to find) and bake as directed. * gluten-free flour 6 parts rice flour 2 parts potato starch flour 1 part tapioca starch flour Fresh Black Currant Filling: 3 Cups fresh Currants (heaping), crush ½ cup. Mix the crushed berries with 1 ½ cup sugar, 3 tablespoons of quick-cooking tapioca and ¼ teaspoon salt. Cook and stir until bubbly; Cook 2 minutes more. Add remaining whole berries, stir in ½ to 1 teaspoon of grated orange peel and ½-2/3 cup of broken walnuts. Fill pastry with the filling and dot with 2 tablespoons of butter, cover with top pastry making slits for steam to escape. Bake at 400 for about 35 minutes.