Jump to content
  • Sign Up

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'blood'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Celiac Disease: Diagnosis, Recovery, Related Disorders & Research
    • Gluten-Free and Celiac Disease Calendar of Events
    • Celiac Disease - Pre-Diagnosis, Testing & Symptoms
    • Celiac Disease - Post Diagnosis, Recovery/Treatment(s)
    • Celiac Disease - Related Disorders & Research
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis
    • Gluten Intolerance and Behavior
  • Celiac Disease Support & Help
    • Celiac Disease - Coping With
    • Celiac Disease - Parents of Kids or Babies With Celiac Disease
    • Gab/Chat Room - To Discuss Anything BUT Celiac Disease / Gluten-Free Diet
    • Celiac Disease - Doctors
    • Celiac Disease - Teenagers & Young Adults Only
    • Celiac Disease - Pregnancy
    • Celiac Disease - Friends and Loved Ones of Celiacs
    • Celiac Meeting Room
    • Celiac Disease - Sleep
    • Celiac Disease - Support Groups
  • Gluten-Free Lifestyle
    • Gluten-Free Foods, Products, Shopping & Medications
    • Gluten-Free Recipes - Baking & Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Restaurants
    • Gluten-Free Ingredients & Food Labeling Issues
    • Celiac Disease - Publications & Publicity
    • Gluten-Free Travel
    • Gluten-Free Diet & Weight Issues
    • Gluten-Free International Room (Outside USA)
    • Gluten-Free Sports and Fitness
  • When A Gluten-Free Diet Just Isn't Enough
    • Other Food Intolerance and Leaky Gut Issues
    • Super Sensitive Celiacs & Gluten Sensitive
    • Alternative Diets
  • Forum Technical Assistance
    • Board/Forum Technical Help
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Events
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Groups/Organizations in the DFW area

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Celiac.com Sponsors
  • Celiac Disease
  • Safe Gluten-Free Food List / Unsafe Foods & Ingredients
  • Gluten-Free Food & Product Reviews
  • Gluten-Free Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: American & International Foods
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Biscuits, Rolls & Buns
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Noodles & Dumplings
    • Gluten-Free Dessert Recipes: Pastries, Cakes, Cookies, etc.
    • Gluten-Free Bread Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Flour Mixes
    • Gluten-Free Kids Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Snacks & Appetizers
    • Gluten-Free Muffin Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pancake Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pizza Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Soups, Sauces, Dressings & Chowders
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Scone Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Waffle Recipes
  • Celiac Disease Diagnosis, Testing & Treatment
  • Miscellaneous Information on Celiac Disease
    • Additional Celiac Disease Concerns
    • Celiac Disease Research Projects, Fundraising, Epidemiology, Etc.
    • Conferences, Publicity, Pregnancy, Church, Bread Machines, Distillation & Beer
    • Gluten-Free Diet, Celiac Disease & Codex Alimentarius Wheat Starch
    • Gluten-Free Food Ingredient Labeling Regulations
    • Celiac.com Podcast Edition
  • Celiac Disease & Gluten Intolerance Research
  • Celiac Disease & Related Diseases and Disorders
    • Lists of Diseases and Disorders Associated with Celiac Disease
    • Addison's Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Anemia and Celiac Disease
    • Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia and Celiac Disease
    • Arthritis and Celiac Disease
    • Asthma and Celiac Disease
    • Ataxia, Nerve Disease, Neuropathy, Brain Damage and Celiac Disease
    • Attention Deficit Disorder and Celiac Disease
    • Autism and Celiac Disease
    • Bacterial Overgrowth and Celiac Disease
    • Cancer, Lymphoma and Celiac Disease
    • Candida Albicans and Celiac Disease
    • Canker Sores (Aphthous Stomatitis) & Celiac Disease
    • Casein / Cows Milk Intolerance and Celiac Disease
    • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Cognitive Impairment and Celiac Disease
    • Crohn's Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Depression and Celiac Disease
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis: Skin Condition Associated with Celiac Disease
    • Diabetes and Celiac Disease
    • Down Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Dyspepsia, Acid Reflux and Celiac Disease
    • Epilepsy and Celiac Disease
    • Eye Problems, Cataract and Celiac Disease
    • Fertility, Pregnancy, Miscarriage and Celiac Disease
    • Fibromyalgia and Celiac Disease
    • Flatulence (Gas) and Celiac Disease
    • Gall Bladder Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Celiac Disease
    • Geographic Tongue (Glossitis) and Celiac Disease
    • Growth Hormone Deficiency and Celiac Disease
    • Heart Failure and Celiac Disease
    • Infertility, Impotency and Celiac Disease
    • Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Intestinal Permeability and Celiac Disease
    • Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Kidney Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Liver Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Lupus and Celiac Disease
    • Malnutrition, Body Mass Index and Celiac Disease
    • Migraine Headaches and Celiac Disease
    • Multiple Sclerosis and Celiac Disease
    • Myasthenia Gravis Celiac Disease
    • Obesity, Overweight & Celiac Disease
    • Osteoporosis, Osteomalacia, Bone Density and Celiac Disease
    • Psoriasis and Celiac Disease
    • Refractory Celiac Disease & Collagenous Sprue
    • Sarcoidosis and Celiac Disease
    • Scleroderma and Celiac Disease
    • Schizophrenia / Mental Problems and Celiac Disease
    • Sepsis and Celiac Disease
    • Sjogrens Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Skin Problems and Celiac Disease
    • Sleep Disorders and Celiac Disease
    • Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Celiac Disease
    • Thyroid & Pancreatic Disorders and Celiac Disease
    • Tuberculosis and Celiac Disease
  • The Origins of Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Grains and Flours
  • Oats and Celiac Disease: Are They Gluten-Free?
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2018 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2018 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2018 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2018 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2017 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2017 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2017 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2017 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2016 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2016 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2016 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2016 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2015 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2015 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2015 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2015 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2014 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2014 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2014 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2014 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2013 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2013 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2013 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2013 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2012 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2012 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2012 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2012 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2011 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2011 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2006 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2005 Issue
  • Celiac Disease Support Groups
    • United States of America: Celiac Disease Support Groups and Organizations
    • Outside the USA: Celiac Disease Support Groups and Contacts
  • Celiac Disease Doctor Listing
  • Kids and Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Travel
  • Gluten-Free Cooking
  • Gluten-Free
  • Allergy vs. Intolerance
  • Tax Deductions for Gluten-Free Food
  • Gluten-Free Newsletters & Magazines
  • Gluten-Free & Celiac Disease Links
  • History of Celiac.com
    • History of Celiac.com Updates Through October 2007
    • Your E-mail in Support of Celiac.com 1996 to 2006

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Interests


Location

Found 42 results

  1. How long did it take you to get your blood test results? How were you notified of the results (letter, phone call etc.)?
  2. I had a celiac blood "screen" ordered through a GI consultant at a hospital last Friday (23rd November) and was wondering how long you recon it would take for the results to come back. As this was done through a consultant the results won't go straight back to my GP and I can't ring up. The hospital seems to mainly communicate through letters so I was wondering if they'd send a letter with the results it may take a bit longer to come back (I only just got a letter summarising the consultation I had before my test today). I'm just very anxious waiting for the results. (This was done on the NHS in the UK) Please does anyone remember how long it took for their blood results to come back? I'm really desperate.
  3. The following detailed explanation of serological tests for celiac disease was written by Tom Ryan, Technical Service Specialist, INOVA Diagnostics, Inc. There has been a lot of discussion about serological testing for celiac disease recently, specifically regarding tTG (tissue Transglutaminase) testing. I will try to answer some of the many questions that have appeared on this list about all of the tests. First, and this applies to any of the blood tests, you must currently be on a gluten containing diet for the tests to be accurate. Antibodies are produced by the immune system in response to substances that the body perceives as threatening. The immune response that your body produces is its response to being exposed to gluten in the diet and its subsequent effect on the intestinal mucosa. If there is no gluten in the diet, then there is no response that we can measure. A brief change in diet will not have a noticeable effect. If you have been gluten free for a week or so, it will not make any great difference. The response might be marginally less but the difference is insignificant because the body has not had time to respond to the change. Conversely, if you have been gluten free for a protracted period of time and decide to be tested, a brief challenge of a couple of weeks is not enough to elicit a response and get an accurate test. There are several steps that take place to generate an immune response and it takes time both for the positive reaction when gluten is present and to clear the antibodies when gluten is eliminated. There has been a great deal of discussion about how much and how long a challenge should be and there is no consensus. Talk with your Doctor. My personal feeling is that the minimum is 2 slices of bread per day for 6 weeks to get an accurate test but I would not try to second-guess the Doctor. There are basically four tests that can be performed to aid in diagnosing celiac disease. Notice that I say they will aid in diagnosing celiac disease. Immunology is fairly accurate but it is far from being an exact science. All of the lab tests, regardless of the type or source, are presented as aids to diagnosis. They should not be used alone as a basis for diagnosis but rather are intended to be considered in conjunction with the physical examination of the patient as well as the reported symptoms, etc. by a trained physician. There has been a great deal of confusion about what the tests are and I hope to alleviate some of the misunderstandings. There are many terms that we hear. tTG, IgA, IgG, ELISA, etc. What are all of these? Some contributors to the list make reference to the IgA or IgG test or to the ELISA test. These labels are incomplete for our purposes and could be referring to any number of different tests. We all have, within our bodies, a family of closely related although not identical proteins which are capable of acting as antibodies. These are collectively referred to as immunoglobulins. Five major types of immunoglobulins are normally present in the human adult. They are IgG, IgA, IgM, IgE and IgD. Each of these is a shorthand way of writing immunoglobulin gamma G (or A or M, etc.) and they each perform a different function in our systems. IgG is the principal immunoglobulin in human serum. It is important in providing immunity in a developing fetus because it will pass across the placental barrier. IgA is the principal immunoglobulin in secretions from respiratory and intestinal mucosa. IgE is a gamma globulin produced by cells lining the intestinal and respiratory tracts. It produces the antibodies associated with most hypersensitivity (allergic) responses. It is associated with asthma, hay fever, etc. IgM is a globulin formed in almost every immune response in the early part of the reaction. IgD is a rare protein present in normal sera in a tiny amount. These designations refer to the type of protein that is carrying the antibody in question. Both IgG and IgA subtypes of anti-gliadin antibody are produced, hence we refer to them as IgG gliadin or IgA gliadin. Collectively they are anti-gliadin antibodies. Anti-Gliadin Antibodies: Both IgA and IgG anti-gliadin antibodies (AGA) are detected in sera of patients with gluten sensitive enteropathy (celiac disease). IgG anti-gliadin antibodies are more sensitive but are less specific markers for disease compared with IgA class antibodies. IgA anti-gliadin antibodies are less sensitive but are more specific. In clinical trials, the IgA antibodies have a specificity of 97% but the sensitivity is only 71%. That means that, if a patient is IgA positive, there is a 97% probability that they have celiac disease. Conversely, if the patient is IgA negative, there is only a 71% probability that the patient is truly negative for celiac disease. Therefore, a positive result is a strong indication that the patient has the disease but a negative result does not necessarily mean that they don not have it. False positive results are rather uncommon but false negative results can occur. On the other hand, the IgG anti-gliadin antibodies are 91% specific and have an 87% sensitivity. This means that they will show positive results more readily but there is not as strong a correlation with celiac disease. It is less specific. Patients with other conditions but not afflicted with celiac disease will occasionally show positive results. IgG anti-gliadin antibodies are detectable in approximately 21% of patients with other gastrointestinal disorders. This test might yield false positive results but is less likely to yield false negative results. A sensitive testing protocol includes testing for both IgA and IgG anti-gliadin antibodies since a significant portion of celiac patients (approx. 2-5%) are IgA deficient. This combined IgA and IgG anti-gliadin antibody assay has an overall sensitivity of 95% with a specificity of 90%. The type of test used to detect the anti-gliadin antibodies is called an ELISA. This is an acronym and it stands for Enzyme Linked Immuno-Sorbent Assay. ELISA is not a test in itself. It is a method of testing and it is a relatively simple test to perform. It involves putting a measured amount of diluted patient serum into the wells of a specially constructed and prepared plate and incubating it for a period of time with various chemicals. The end result is a color change, the intensity of which is dependent upon the concentration of anti-gliadin antibody (or other protein being measured) in the patient serum. The ability of this colored solution to absorb light at a particular wavelength can be measured on a laboratory instrument and mathematically compared with solutions that contain a known amount of anti-gliadin antibody to arrive at a number for the amount of antibody present. The sample can then be classified as negative, (0-20 units); weak positive, (21-30 units); or moderate to strong positive if greater than 30 units. The purpose of testing for anti-gliadin antibodies includes, in addition to diagnosis of gluten sensitive enteropathy, monitoring for compliance to a gluten free diet. IgA gliadin antibodies increase rapidly in response to gluten in the diet and decrease rapidly when gluten is absent from the diet. The IgA anti-gliadin antibodies can totally disappear in 2-6 months on a gluten free diet, so they are useful as a diet control. By contrast, IgG anti-gliadin antibodies need a long time, sometimes more than a year, to become negative. The reverse is also true. That is, a patient with celiac disease who has been on a gluten free diet and tests negative for IgA anti-gliadin antibodies, will show a rapid increase in antibody production when challenged by gluten in the diet. Approximately 90% of challenged patients will yield a positive IgA anti-gliadin result within 14-35 days after being challenged. The IgG antibodies are somewhat slower. Endomysial Antibodies: IgA class anti-endomysial antibodies (AEA) are very specific, occurring only in celiac disease and DH. These antibodies are found in approximately 80% of patients with DH and in essentially 100% of patients with active celiac disease. IgA endomysial antibodies are more sensitive and specific than gliadin antibodies for diagnosis of celiac disease. Antibody titers (dilutions) are found to parallel morphological changes in the jejunum and can also be used to reflect compliance with gluten-free diets. Titers decrease or become negative in patients on gluten free diets and reappear upon gluten challenge. The test for anti-endomysial antibodies is more subjective and more complicated for the lab to perform than the anti-gliadin assays. It involves serially diluting some of the patients serum, that is, diluting it by ½ then ¼, 1/8, 1/16, etc. and putting these dilutions on a glass slide that has some sort of tissue affixed to it. The slide is then processed with various solutions and examined under a fluorescent microscope to determine if any of that serum binds to any of the proteins in the tissue. If so, then that patient is confirmed as having antibodies to that particular protein. This method of testing is called an IFA or sometimes IIFA. It stands for Indirect Immuno-Fluorescent Assay. The selection of which tissue slide to use is determined by what specific protein, hence which antibody, you are specifically looking for. Endomysial antibodies react with the endomysium, which is a sheath of reticular fibrils that surround each muscle fiber. Therefore, to detect endomysial antibodies, you would want to use a tissue substrate that contains a lot of muscle tissue. The substrate used most often for this assay is distal sections of the esophagus. These are very thinly sliced and fixed to the slide. They contain muscle fibers and not much else so there is a lot of endomysium available to react with the anti-endomysial antibodies. Reading this test involves viewing the reacted slides with a fluorescent microscope to make the determination. This requires a highly skilled and trained eye and, of necessity, is somewhat subjective. You are looking for a green fluorescence in the endomysium covering the muscle fibers. The test is reported as the titer or final dilution in which the fluorescence can still clearly be seen. As you can imagine, this is very subjective. There are no standardized values and it is up to the judgment of the particular technician what the endpoint titer is. Recently, (1998) the endomysial antigen targeted by the anti-endomysial antibodies was identified as the protein cross-linking enzyme known as tissue transglutaminase (tTG). This has enabled the production of an antigen specific ELISA assay incorporating tTG as a reliable and objective alternative to the traditional and subjective Immunofluorescence based assays. In clinical trials, the correlation with the endomysial IFA assay has been shown to be close to 100%. This is a test that has been very well received in the professional community. It is an ELISA, like the anti-gliadin antibody test and, as such, is not subject to interpretation like the IFA. That is the greatest advantage to this new test! With this or any ELISA, the response is measured on an instrument that calculates the amount of light of a particular wavelength that is absorbed by the solution and prints out a numerical result. There is no chance of human error skewing the results because there is no judgment call involved. The ELISA plate, regardless of what you are testing for, is processed with at least three control sera (sometimes as many as eight) in addition to the unknown sample being tested. There is a negative serum and at least two positive sera containing different levels of the antibody being tested. There are specific requirements for the absorption levels of these three controls. That is, each of them has a minimum or maximum (or both) number that must be seen by the instrument in order for it to be a valid test. If there is any variance from these expected numbers, it is an indication that something went wrong and the test results are discarded and the test repeated. There is therefore no way the technician could report inaccurate results, (assuming they diluted the sample correctly). Either the test was valid, and you can rely upon the accuracy of the result, or the test is invalid, and the entire result discarded. If any error was made during the processing of the ELISA plate, it would result in the control sera numbers being out of range and the entire test result would be thrown out. In summary, the tTG ELISA is measuring the same thing that the endomysial IFA is measuring but with a method that is more sensitive and specific and not subject to interpretation. IgA class Reticulin antibodies are found only in Celiac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis. These antibodies are found in approximately 60% of celiac disease patients and 25% of DH patients. This test is falling into disuse because of the limited utility and the availability of better tests. It is an IFA performed on a tissue substrate with all the attendant problems that go along with it. The development of all of these serum assays has tremendously simplified the diagnosis of celiac disease and improved the accuracy as well. The original criteria for diagnosis according to the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, (ESPGAN), involved a year of arduous studies with: An initial positive gut biopsy; 6 months on a gluten free diet; A second, negative gut biopsy; A gluten challenge for 6 months and; A third, positive gut biopsy. The revised ESPGAN criteria call for positive results in two of the serological tests confirmed by a single positive biopsy. In practice, many gastroenterologists are utilizing the serologies in conjunction with a controlled diet and the clinical presentation to form a basis for diagnosis without the need for the invasive procedure. Through the auspices of the Celiac Disease Foundation and others, a professional symposium and workshop was organized earlier this year in Marina Del Rey, California with participants from Europe as well as the U.S. to establish standards for reporting test results. This should improve testing and diagnosis even more. At the conclusion of this conference a Celiac Disease Standardization Committee was formed to investigate and make recommendations on a standardized method of reporting results.
  4. Celiac.com 09/03/2018 - Can an office-based point of care test (POCT) improve celiac disease detection and diagnosis? A team of researchers recently set out to measure the diagnostic performance of an IgA/IgG-deamidated gliadin peptide (DGP)-based POCT for celiac disease detection, patient acceptability, and inter-observer variability of the POCT results. The research team included Michelle S. Lau MBChB, Peter D. Mooney MD, William L. White MBChB, Michael A. Rees BMedSci, Simon H. Wong MBChB, Marios Hadjivassiliou FRCP, Peter H. R. Green MD, Benjamin Lebwohl MD & David S. Sanders FRCP. They are variously affiliated with the Academic Department of Gastroenterology, the Academic Department of Neurosciences and University of Sheffield, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals, Sheffield, UK, and with the Celiac Disease Centre at Columbia University Medical Centre in New York, NY, USA. Beginning in 2013, and running through 2017, the team recruited patients who had been referred for secondary care with gastrointestinal symptoms, anemia and/or weight loss (group 1), along with a group of patients with self-reported gluten sensitivity, but unknown celiac disease status (group 2). Every patient in the study received a POCT, tests for IgA-tissue transglutaminase (IgA-TTG), IgA-endomysial antibodies (IgA-EMA), total IgA levels, and a duodenal biopsy. A total of 500 patients completed acceptability questionnaires, and the team compared inter-observer variability of the POCT results among five clinical staff for 400 cases. Group 1 included 1,000 patients. The team saw forty-one patients (4.1%) diagnosed with celiac disease. The sensitivities of the POCT, IgA-TTG, and IgA-EMA were 82.9, 78.1, and 70.7%; the specificities were 85.4, 96.3, and 99.8%. Group 2 included 61 patients. The POCT showed 100% sensitivity, but negative predictive value in detecting celiac disease in group 2. A majority of patients preferred the POCT to a blood draw (90.4% to 2.8%). A Fleiss Kappa coefficient of 0.895 reflected good inter-observer agreement on the POCT results. The POCT had comparable sensitivity to a blood test, and accurately spotted all celiac disease cases in a gluten sensitive group. But, because its low specificity may could cause further unnecessary tests, it’s not good enough to take the place of blood testing. It turns out that spotting celiac disease is only part of the battle. Making sure to rule out people who don’t have celiac disease is equally important. That’s why it’s important that any diagnostic test be both sensitive, to spot celiac disease, and specific, to rule out celiac disease in those who don’t have it. Until we get a PCOT with high enough sensitivity and specificity to make accurate celiac diagnosis and accurate elimination of those without celiac disease, the current blood testing regime will continue. Read more at: The American Journal of Gastroenterology; volume 113, pages1238–1246 (2018)
  5. A week ago Johnny Rockets mistakenly served us regular gluten buns, not thinking of the miscoloring, I ate it. I had EXTREME gas pain, bowel movements and blood the night after and have been suffering through tons of blood when having a bowel movement ever since. Tonight though.. I had the weirdest looking poop like seperated in weird ways and I don’t know if it should be a concern? I’m sorry for any graphic images but I need to know asap!
  6. If anyone could clear this up for me it would be really helpful. My primary care doctor wasn’t able to get me in for months and my insurance isn’t very good so I found a lab online to do blood work. i only did the gluten allergy IGg blood test. I got my results online today and I don’t understand them fully. From what it says I’m ‘in range’ but my range is exactly what the range number is. Therefor is it higher than average just not high enough to be out of range? This is the results I have. In range <2.0 Reference range <2.0 mcg/mL so technically I’m not over the range but there’s nothing to reference, as in do most people that aren’t gluten sensitive have a 0? Because I feel awful most days with serious brain fog, anxiety and depression and massive headaches that never go away and stomach cramps and I can’t see what else could be causing this. I already had an ultrasound from my gynecologist and I don’t have anything visably wrong on the ultra sound causing the stomach cramping. Any insight would be helpful since I can’t get a doctor to fully interpret this. Thank you!!
  7. Hi, im just wondering how long you all waited for your results for endoscopy biopsy? I rang the lab today and apparently they have already been sent to my gp! That seems really quick to me! Also what were your symptoms? i went gluten free about 10 years ago. Was having stomach issues. Did every test but the endoscopy (I chickened out). Fast forward stomach issues returned. So return for a bunch of tests. Got diagnosed with Hashimotos. So Doc recommended confirming celiac. Gluten challenged. Omg that really sucked! Crippling pain, tired all the time. Toilet drama, I looked pregnant, so much so that people actually asked! So bloated! Gong to Gp tomorrow...
  8. So a couple years ago I was tested for celiac... Ttg IgG/IgA were all negative DGA IgG/IgA were all negative AGA IgG: Positive AGA IgA Negative HLADQB1*02 Negative HLADQB1*03:02 Negative HLADQA1*05 Positive Biopsies have all been negative. I suffer from Hashimoto's thyroiditis and I just feel miserable with all the body aches and brain fog. My son was born back in July and I'm just so tired of not feeling well and I really want to finally feel good and enjoy life to the fullest. I'm thinking of asking for my labs to be repeated again and see. I'm just wondering if it is possible for me to still have celiac or if I'm just looking for something that just isn't there because I'm desperate for answers... Appreciate any input!! Thank you
  9. Celiac.com 11/13/2017 - ImmusanT, Inc., the company working to develop a therapeutic vaccine to protect HLADQ2.5+ patients with celiac disease against the effects of gluten, presented data that shows a way to tell the difference between celiac disease and non-celiac gluten-sensitive (NCGS) based on cytokine levels. Professor Knut Lundin, University of Oslo, presented the data at United European Gastroenterology (UEG) Week 2017. The results are important, in part because many people go on a gluten-free diet before they ever get diagnosed with celiac disease. It's hard for doctors to ask these people to start eating gluten again so that they can be properly diagnosed. But that's how it currently works. If there are no anti-gliadin antibodies in your blood, current tests are not accurate. These data suggest that it is possible to spot celiac disease through plasma or blood test. Along with easier, more accurate celiac diagnoses, a blood test would be a major breakthrough because "patients would only be required to consume gluten on one occasion and would still achieve accurate results," said Robert Anderson, MBChB, Ph.D., Chief Scientific Officer of ImmusanT. The test may also help people who do not have celiac disease, but find symptom relief on a gluten-free diet. For these people, gluten may not be the cause of their symptoms and a gluten-free diet may be totally unnecessary. The latest data support the company's approach to "developing a simple blood test for diagnosing celiac disease without the discomfort and inconvenience of current testing methods. This would be the first biomarker for measuring systemic T-cell immunity to gluten," said Leslie Williams, Chief Executive Officer of ImmusanT. As development is ongoing, further tests are expected to flesh out the details. Source: Immusant
  10. hi all, i am a newbie on here and still a bit confused about the hole thing! i suffered with constipation and tiredness for a long time and put on weight real easy even tho i eat really healthy! i went to the doctor on numberous occasions and they always told me to drink more water! eat more fruit and veg! anyway long story short a new doctor suggested doing a blood test for wheat and sure enough, it came back high! TTG 150 +,, i was shocked to say the least, so i was booked in for a gastro and colon test.... However, the person doing the gastro test asked me a few questions of what i was in for and why the test, i told her for coeliac and she asked about symptoms, told her mine and she told me in a near condescending way that thats not coeliac symptoms and kinda laughed at me and shock her head! at the time i didnt realise my bloods where high or did not know much about the blood results or the hole thing really! When she finished she said just as i though they look normal, i felt a bit stupid as i was half drugged too! Anyway, 4 weeks later i went for my colon test and the doctor (a different one) asked me a few questions again!! i was reluctant to say i was being tested for coeliac and i had a gastro test a couple of weeks before hand, he pulled out the file and had a look through it and said, yes you arecoeliac,,, not sure how this happened or why i wasnt told properly or even what happens next??? now this was only last week. Has anyone else had my symtoms?? alot of people i spoke to seem to have the opposite effect?? and if so, has the diet made a difference to them? How, long did it take? and will this tiredness go away!! Anyway thanks in advance!!
  11. Celiac.com 11/11/2017 - (NOTE: This article is from 2012 and is being made available as Celiac.com rolls our past issues of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity) It's just like being a little kid with a super sore throat and your mom taking you to the doctor to get a test for strep throat. The doctor swabs your throat with two sticks to find out what nasty bacteria is camping out. In just moments you've got a diagnosis of strep throat and can start antibiotics to miraculously make the pain go away. You go home with a prescription, get in bed and eat mom's homemade chicken rice soup until you feel better in a couple of days. How cool would it be if getting diagnosed with celiac disease was this easy? The wonderful news is that we're getting closer to having a test that will diagnose celiac disease with just a simple prick of a finger and a 10-minute wait. The CeliacSure Test Kit measures (anti-tTG) IGA antibodies from a fingertip blood sample. It works by taking a small drop of blood, mixing it with a buffer and applying the mixture onto a test cartridge. Within moments two red lines appear if the test is positive, while only one line appears if the result is negative. And, you can take the test at home without ever getting out of your pajamas! "The test kit is a point-of-care, at-home test that's very similar to reading results of a pregnancy test," said Dr. Daniel Leffler of the Celiac Disease Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. Dr. Leffler, a gastroenterologist by training with a background in nutrition, has a long-standing interest in celiac disease. Several years ago he teamed up with Dr. Ciaran Kelly and Dietitian Melinda Dennis to found the Celiac Disease Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center where they focus not only on providing top notch patient care, but also on high level disease research. The latest project: studying the efficacy of the CeliacSure test for celiac disease diagnosis. Dr. Leffler said his team got involved with the finger prick test study because they feel it's important to take down barriers to patients getting diagnosed with celiac disease. "We do a lot with educating other medical providers about offering in-clinic testing, but I think it's really important to put a tool in the hands of the people." "We've teamed up with the [marketers] of the test kit at GlutenPro/Biocard CeliacSure Test to see how effective this test is in the USA. We're providing 2 kits per family to use on first-degree relatives of people with celiac disease. To qualify, participants in the study must not be on a gluten-free diet. We send them the test kit to take as well as a survey about their ability to use and understand the test. The goal is that this small study comes out favorable [sic] so we can move on to large scale studies that will compare the finger prick test to the gold standard laboratory serology testing." Dr. Leffler says he's really excited about the potential of this point-of-care test because it will "allow us to reach a population that might not otherwise come in to get tested, mainly first degree relatives of patients already diagnosed with celiac disease." It's important to note that right now the CeliacSure test is only for research purposes, not actual diagnosis. It is available in Canada and other countries, but it's still under evaluation here in the United States. And, while the strep throat analogy is a great way to think about how this test will work, it's extremely important to understand that if you get a positive result with the CeliacSure test, do not start a gluten-free diet until you have followed up with a doctor to confirm the diagnosis. As with all medical studies there's some fine print you need to know about. Participants in the study must meet all of the following criteria: 1. Over the age of 18 2. A first or second degree relative with celiac disease 3. Not previously diagnosed with celiac disease 4. Not on a gluten-free diet or low-gluten diet within the past 3 months 5. Able and willing to self administer the test, complete a short survey form and return both in the envelope provided 6. Willingness to have follow up medical evaluation in the event of a positive test 7. A resident of the United States Listen to a full interview with Dr. Leffler about the CeliacSure study on the Hold the Gluten Podcast (http://traffic.libsyn.com/holdthegluten/050_HoldTheGluten-05Apr2012.mp3) with Vanessa Maltin Weisbrod and Maureen Stanley now! And, if you would like to participate in the study, please contact Dr. Toufic Kabbani at celiac@bidmc.harvard.edu or by phone at 617-667-0528.
  12. I recently took a blood test and went over the results with my GI doctor who will be performing and endoscopy and colonoscopy on me soon. I can't remember exactly what she said, but I believe she was talking about my IGA-TTG levels. She said the normal range was under 10 but mine was 639. I think she was talking about IGA-TTG but I'm not sure. For people who have done this test what were your high levels? Thanks! Female, 16
  13. Celiac.com 08/28/2017 - After 14-day gluten challenge, an HLA-DQ-gluten tetramer blood test provides better detection of celiac disease than biopsy. Can that lead to new disease detection methods in patients who are already on a gluten-free diet? Doctors attempting to diagnose celiac disease are often confronted by patients who have already given up gluten. For such patients, diagnostic guidelines currently call for a gluten challenge of at least 14 days, followed by duodenal biopsy. There isn't much good data on how many false-positive results are generated by this method. To get a better picture, a team of researchers recently studied responses to 14-day gluten challenge in subjects with treated celiac disease. The research team included Vikas K Sarna, Gry I Skodje, Henrik M Reims, Louise F Risnes, Shiva Dahal-Koirala, Ludvig M Sollid, and Knut E A Lundin. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Immunology and Transfusion Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Norway; K. G. Jebsen Coeliac Disease Research Centre, University of Oslo, Norway; Department of Clinical Service, Oslo University Hospital, Norway; Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Norway; Centre for Immune Regulation, University of Oslo and Oslo University Hospital, Norway; and the Department of Gastroenterology, Oslo University Hospital, Norway. The research team took a group of 20 patients with biopsy-verified celiac disease, all in confirmed mucosal remission, and presented them with a dietary gluten challenge of 5.7 grams per oral gluten per day for 14 days, then conducted duodenal biopsies. They analyzed blood by multiplex assay for cytokine detection, and by flow cytometry using HLA-DQ:gluten tetramers. Nineteen of the twenty participants completed the challenge. Biopsy results showed villous blunting in 5 of those 19 patients. Villous height to crypt depth ratio reduced with at least 0.4 concomitantly with an increase in intraepithelial lymphocyte count of at least 50% in 9 of the 19 patients. Interleukin-8 plasma concentration increased by more than 100% after 4 hours in 7 of 19 subjects. Frequency of blood CD4+effector-memory gut-homing HLA-DQ:gluten tetramer-binding T cells increased by more than 100% on day 6 in 12 of 15 evaluated participants. For most celiac patients, a 14-day gluten challenge did not result in sufficient mucosal architectural changes for clear diagnosis (sensitivity ≈25%–50%). The team found that an increase in CD4+ effector-memory gut-homing HLA-DQ:gluten tetramer-binding T cells in blood 6 days after gluten challenge is a more sensitive and less invasive biomarker for celiac disease. The team is calling for further study. Being able to diagnose celiac disease without biopsy could really help to improve the entire diagnostic process, and could easily lead to an increase in diagnosis. Source: Gut
  14. Celiac.com 06/24/2017 - This easy to make recipe marries the flavors of blood orange, soy sauce, ginger and garlic with chicken to deliver a tasty gluten-free entrée. The result is a delicious Asian-style pork chop in which the juice of the marinade blends with juice from blood oranges to make a delicious sauce. Ingredients: 4 pork chops, bone-in 4-5 crushed garlic cloves 2-inch thumb of fresh ginger, sliced thin 1 teaspoon black pepper ¾ cup gluten-free soy sauce 1 cup fresh blood orange juice 1 tablespoon lard or bacon fat 3 tablespoons potato starch, for dredging chops ½ cup cream Directions: First, in a gallon Ziplock bag add the garlic, ginger, pepper, gluten-free soy sauce and orange juice. Taste the marinade, and adjust the salt as needed by adding more orange juice. Add pork chops and place in refrigerator for 3-8 hours. Remove the marinated chops, and dry with paper towels. Dredge chops lightly with potato starch. Reserve marinade to make sauce later. Heat large stainless steel or cast iron skillet on medium high. Add butter or lard and brown the pork chops 2-4 minutes on each side, depending on thickness. Remove pork chops to a plate. Add marinade back into the skillet and bring to boil. Boil down for about 5 minutes on medium boil. Turn off heat and let it cool a little before adding the cream. If you are using regular full-fat cream, you can add when the sauce is still boiling. Serve with rice and our favorite vegetables.
  15. Hi everyone, just wanting your opinion on whether you think my 9 yr old son could be coeliac. He started vomiting about 5 weeks ago and complaining of a sore tummy. First doctor said constipation and told him to drink some water. 2nd doctor ordered bloods and coeliac screen. Results CLINICAL NOTES: IMMUNOLOGY SPECIMEN: SERUM COELIAC DISEASE ANTIBODIES REFERENCE RANGES Normal Low Mod. Strong Deamidated Gliadin IgG * 24 CU (< 20) (20-50) (51-80) (> 80) Tissue Transglutaminase IgA * 24 CU (< 20) (20-50) (51-80) (> 80) INTERPRETATION Low level of tissue transglutaminase antibodies of uncertain clinical significance. RECOMMENDATIONS If clinical suspicion remains high, tests on a fresh blood sample for HLA DQ2/DQ8 are recommended. Negative DQ2/DQ8 virtually excludes coeliac disease. If DQ2/DQ8 positive, small bowel biopsy may be required. They are calling this low positive. We had tested genes and while waiting for results my son got very sick and was admitted to hospital for an inflamed large bowel which they then attributed to him having clampobacyter. They then said all his symptoms and possibly the coeliac screen results were because of this bug even though his symptoms started 3 1/2 weeks before he got sick with the bug. They sent us home and and said he'd get better. 2 days later I drove him to our closest city to another hospital as he couldn't stop throwing up and they admitted him again. They finally agreed after discussions with 3 c different departments and infectious diseases that the bug was not the cause of his existing symptoms but are still reluctant to look at coeliac even though his gene test came back positive for 2 genes. They have tentatively diagnosed him with gastro paresis as he is vomiting up to 11 times a day. He is pale, has dark circles under his eyes and complains of constant tummy pain that increases at times during g the day. I guess I'm just wondering if he fits the profile for coeliac or at this point in just hoping it is so I know what's wrong and can do something g to fix it instead of just watch him get sicker. Thanks so much for any response. xx
  16. Hi - my 9 year old daughter was diagnosed in February. She had a seemingly routine winter cold and developed stomach pain, diarrhea, and blood in her stool. Blood work and biopsy tested positive for Celiac. We put her on a gluten-free diet right away and she improved significantly and quickly. The blood stopped almost immediately. She still gets almost daily mild stomach pain/gas pain. It lasts only a minute or two. A few days ago her class used flour in science to make play dough (I was not aware). She got diarrhea a day later and a few days later she had some blood again in her stool. Has anyone else had experience with: (1) blood in the stool and (2) ongoing daily mild tummy aches even after gluten-free? I am so worried about her. Thank you!!!
  17. Celiac.com 03/01/2017 - Do people who eat a gluten-free diet face an increased exposure to toxic metals like arsenic and mercury, and thus possibly higher rates of cardiovascular disease, cancer and neurological effects? That's a very possible scenario, according to a report published in the journal Epidemiology. Maria Argos, assistant professor of epidemiology in the UIC School of Public Health, and her colleagues searched data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for a link between gluten-free diet and biomarkers of toxic metals in blood and urine. Of the 7,471 people they surveyed between 2009 and 2014, they found 73 participants who reported eating a gluten-free diet. People on a gluten-free diet higher concentrations of arsenic in their urine, and mercury in their blood, than those who ate a non-gluten-free diet. In fact, arsenic levels for gluten-free eaters were nearly twice as high, and mercury levels were 70 percent higher. So, does a gluten-free diet pose an actual health risk? Do people need to make any immediate dietary changes? While noteworthy, Argos says the findings indicate the need for more studies, "to determine if there are corresponding health consequences that could be related to higher levels of exposure to arsenic and mercury by eating gluten-free." Argos points out that the EU has in place regulations for food-based arsenic exposure, while the United States does not. The question that needs to be answered if whether rice flour consumption increases the risk for exposure to arsenic. An answer to that requires further study. Source: University of Illinois at Chicago
  18. My daughter did blood test for antibodies anti-Transglutaminase (tTG) IgA and/or IgG (which is to determine whether it is Celiac or not) and the doctor never told us that she didn't have to eat anything before the test (she tends to fade). If she ate something with gluten before your blood test, is it possible that it comes out positive even if she's not or viceversa?
  19. Celiac.com 09/13/2016 - A 10-year-old girl allegedly fell ill after eating pizza that was supposed to be gluten-free, but which turned out to be standard pizza. The girl, Sydney Bayle, became violently ill, and ended up in the local emergency room. The attorney for Grotto Pizza says the company has admitted making a "mistake." Now the parents, Samuel and Victoria Bayle, of Edinboro, Erie County, are seeking monetary damages against both Grotto Pizza and Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center in Plains Township, including doctors and nurses. After becoming ill and checking in at the Medical Center's Emergency Room, the parents claim that medical center staff made the Sydney wait for nearly three hours, where she continued to be ill enough to vomit blood. Sydney has suffered from celiac disease from birth, according to the complaint. Read more at: Timesleader.com
  20. Hello everyone and btw please excuse me if my english is bad ): ! the idea of having celiac has been around my head since a significant time ago, i have anti thyroid autoantibodies and a borderline t4 and tsh, dry eye, multiple joint and muscle pain, acid reflux, stomach pain, diarrhea alternated with constipation, floating and weird stoles, psoriasis, nausea, dizziness, vitamin A deficit, vitamin b12 decifit, vitamin D deficit, random bleeding from lady parts, not related to ovulation, menstruation or anything, im tired all the time and im done feeling like crap everyday, my medic of course suspect celiac so i have a blood work done, it come back negative, i also had what i think was herpetiform dermatitis, sadly i didn't know about it at that time and as i have psoriasis gutata too and it looks kind of similar i think it was the same thing at the beginning, they were blisters that itch a lot on my knees, i should have gone to the doctor but now its too late since they are gone so i cant, the thing is, i was gluten free almost 100% for a very long time, it was kind of intuitive, i didn't think i had celiac at that point, but notice a significant difference eating that way so i "follow my instinct", the dermatitis and psoriasis disappear, later i started consuming gluten once in a while but not in a regular way, maybe one week i eat something, the next week anything, etc etc (i had symptoms this way and thats why i went to the doctor), i was told by my doctor to eat gluten for at least two weeks before the blood work, and i was so bad that i had to go to the urgency's, a lot of stomach pain and constipation, fever, diarrhea, it was hell, so i eat as much as i can but maybe not as regular as i should, Now that i see that all antibodies are completely normal i feel lost and crazy, should i do the biopsy anyway? i dont know any other way to explain the multiple vitamin deficit since i eat really healthy, could this have to be with the fact that i was gluten free for a long time? (the absence of antibodies) even tho i consume gluten once in a while at those times? every antibody come back negative and i had a total IGA and im not deficient. I dont know what to think, i was on my period when blood work was done and i also had flu like syntoms, my immune system was hitting rock bottom as always on these days, maybe that's the reason? idk what to think really... any advice or thought
  21. I am so frustrated right now!! I have a stool test with occult blood - with celiac, a family history of stomach cancer and polyps, and a red meat based diet - also a risk factor for colon cancer. My allergist looks at it and says it's essential my GI repeat the test, this time avoiding red meat before in case it's a false positive. Of course, if it's a real positive, a colonoscopy is needed. I fax my results to my GI, a week later, I get a voice message "he says there's no need to repeat the test." Also, apparently no need for a colonoscopy either. My ttg continues to slowly increase too. We are now so meticulously gluten free that we all even shower first thing when coming home in case we have somehow picked up gluten that's getting transferred to the food. Every product - including shampoos, soap, toothpaste, cleaners, paper towels (the glue to the roll would be the issue), every little thing - is verified as gluten-free. I eat zero processed food - one BBQ sauce that is verified gluten-free both by the manufacturer and running our own test to 5 PPM. So it can't be gluten, I'm quite sure. But it's climbed from 2.8 to 7.5 slowly. Any ideas??? To me, it's most likely a second autoimmune disease, but I've had basic autoimmune tests done, and good luck convincing any doctor I need more. LOL I should also add - I haven't eaten a meal outside of my home for over a year, so that can't be it. Help!!! I'm open to ideas!!
  22. Hi all, I don't know whether kidney disease is celiac related or not but hopefully someone here can advise. I recently had a general blood test as I'd been feeling unwell. I think I've been glutened tbh but I also felt lethargic and out of sorts. I asked for thyroid and other levels to be checked. Frustratingly they didnt run the TTG - something I'm really down about. Anyway, The doctor looked at my test results and told me (via the receptionist) there was nothing to worry about. Given past experiences I requested a paper copy of the results and I found the following under the renal profile section:Renal profile 142 (135-145)Serum Sodium 4.7 (3.5 5.3)Serum potassium 5.5 (2.5 - 7.5)Serum urea 93 (62 - 120)Serum creatinine 93 (62 - 120)GFR 77ml/min/1.73m^2 - STAGE 2: CKD only if other evidence of renal damageThe doctor is presumably happy with this but I'm a little concerned. Should I ask for a doctors appointment and perhaps a urine test? Is the GFR result on its own not sufficient reason to investigate further? Many thanks for any advice you can offer Matt
  23. Hello all I'm very new to all this and I'm so confused. My test results are in the picture attached. I had a biopsy and it said that I didn't have villi atrophy but that there were signs of mild intestinal irritation and H. pylori bacteria was found, so GI said it's not celiac disease . I have terrible joint pain and my ears feel like they are full with constant dizziness/vertigo. I know that the tTG test can be low when there hasn't been damage but the other two tests were so high. Does this mean that I am or not Celiac? Should I stop eating Gluten? I also had low vitamin D results and ferritin was low as well. I'm not a big gluten eater as I'm seldom hungry to begin with so could this be what has helped me. Last night I had a big bowl of pasta and woke up this morning so bloated and unwell. Any one have tests like this and later was in fact gluten intolerant? Any response would be greatly appreciated.
  24. Hello everyone, after 2 years of symptoms I've finally decided to speak to my doctor. What a weight off my shoulders! He has booked me in for a blood test and I'll be given some sachets to mix in with water that may help me to go 'regular'. One of the nurses will do the blood test and I wanted to know, what should I ask whilst I am there!? I never go to the doctors, I'm quite healthy (apart from all the stomach problems I've been ignoring). Has anyone had a blood test and can tell me what to expect? Thank you, Shez
  25. Celiac.com 12/24/2015 - Laboratory tests for hemoglobin, ferritin, calcium, folate, vitamin B12, vitamin D, and thyroid function are regularly ordered in children with celiac disease, despite sufficient evidence for their necessity. To determine the frequency of nutritional deficiencies and levels of thyroid dysfunction in children with celiac disease, researches conducted a study that examined children before and after the initiation of a gluten-free diet. The research team included Margaretha Maria Susanna Wessels, MD, Iris I. van Veen, MD, Sabine Lisa Vriezinga, MD, Hein Putter, PhD, Edmond Henri Herman Maria Rings, MD, PhD, and Maria Luisa Mearin, MD, PhD. They are affiliated with the Department of Pediatrics, Department of Statistics, and the Department of Pediatrics, Erasmus University Medical Center, Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. For their study, the team evaluated test results for hemoglobin, ferritin, folate, vitamin B12, calcium, vitamin D (25[OH]D), free thyroxin, and thyroid stimulating hormone of children with celiac disease regularly seen at the Leiden University Medical Center between 2009 and 2014. The team used laboratory reference ranges to define abnormal results. For statistical analysis, they used Pearson χ2 test for trend, unpaired t test, and 1-way ANOVA. Their results for 182 children evaluated, showed 119 were newly diagnosed. About 17% of results were missing for any given year, due to incomplete blood results. The most common deficiencies at the time of celiac diagnosis were iron deficiency, found in 28% of celiac patients, vitamin D deficiencies in 27%, and folate deficiency, in 14%. They also saw iron deficiency anemia in 9%, and vitamin B12 deficiency in 1% of celiac patients. They saw no hypocalcemia or thyroid dysfunction. At follow-up, they observed iron deficiency, iron deficiency anemia, and folate and vitamin D deficiency 8%, 2%, 3%, and 25% of patients, respectively. They found no vitamin B12 deficiency, hypocalcemia, and thyroid disease. From these results, the team concluded that complementary blood investigations are relevant at the time of celiac diagnosis, but have little follow-up use, once the patients adopt a gluten-free diet. They recommend that such tests be conducted only if there is a clear physical issue, such as fatigue or abnormal growth. Source: Journal of Pediatrics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2015.09.078
×