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Found 6 results

  1. Celiac.com 01/28/2019 - Research shows that people with celiac disease have an increased risk of bone fractures, compared to the regular population, but there's not much good data on fracture risk in patients with dermatitis herpetiformis. A team of researchers recently compared self-reported bone fractures in patients with dermatitis herpetiformis against those with celiac disease. The research team included C Pasternack, E Mansikka, K Kaukinen, K Hervonen, T Reunala, P Collin, H Huhtala, VM Mattila, and T Salmi. In all, they looked at self-reported fracture rates in 222 dermatitis herpetiformis patients, and in 129 control subjects with celiac disease. The team provided a Disease Related Questionnaire and the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale and Psychological General Well-Being questionnaires to study members. They received 45 replies from the 222 dermatitis herpetiformis patients, and 35 replies from the 129 celiac disease control subjects. All patients had experienced at least one fracture. Overall, cumulative lifetime fracture rates were about the same for both dermatitis herpetiformis and celiac disease patients. Fractures More Common in Women with Celiac Disease However, when the team looked at the cumulative incidence of fracture after disease diagnosis, they found a significantly higher risk in women with celiac disease than in women with dermatitis herpetiformis. Acid Reflux and Proton-Pump Inhibitor Connection Interestingly, both dermatitis herpetiformis and celiac disease patients with fractures reported more severe reflux symptoms compared to those without. Dermatitis herpetiformis and celiac disease patients with fractures also reported using more proton-pump inhibitor medication. More research needs to be done to explore this connection. To sum it up, self-reported lifetime bone fracture risk is about the same for both DH and celiac disease patients. However, after diagnosis, fracture risk is higher in women with celiac disease than in women with dermatitis herpetiformis. This means that women with celiac disease need to work with doctors to keep a tight eye on bone integrity, even when eating a gluten-free diet. Source: Nutrients. 2018 Mar 14;10(3). pii: E351. doi: 10.3390/nu10030351
  2. DebLee Salzman

    Gluten Exposure for Celiac

    Celiac diagnosed in 1992. Ate Domino's gluten free pizza (1 small slice every evening for 2 weeks) Experiencing severe bone pain similar to pre-diagnosis. Wondering how long it will last. Anyone else have this following gluten exposure? DebLee
  3. Celiac.com 06/19/2017 - Adults with celiac disease often show atypical symptoms, though it is not uncommon for them to suffer from malabsorption of vitamins and minerals, which can result in disrupt normal bone metabolism. A team of researchers recently set out to evaluate laboratory deficiencies related to bone metabolism, and to assess the relationship between severity of histological damage and the degree of bone mass loss at celiac diagnosis. The research team included L. Posthumus, and A. Al-Toma A of the Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, St Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands. Their team conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study of 176 adult celiac patients. All patients met the histopathological criteria for clinical celiac disease. The team analyzed biochemical data, including calcium, phosphate, alkaline-phosphatase, vitamin D and parathormone. They classified duodenal histology based on Marsh parameters. They used dual X-ray absorptiometry to determine bone mass density (BMD) at the lumbar and femoral regions. P-values below 0.05 were considered significant. They found no correlation between gastrointestinal symptoms and Marsh histopathological stage (P>0.05). Nearly 50 percent of patients showed vitamin D deficiency (44.5%), while only 5.7% showed hypocalcaemia. Patients with Marsh III did show lower calcium (P<0.05) and parathormone was higher (P=0.01). These patients had lower lumbar T-score (P<0.05). Although low BMD occurred in all age groups, most osteoporotic patients were aged 45-49 years (81.8%). A multiple regression analysis did show that Marsh stage could indicate lower lumbar BMD (r=0.322, B=-1.146, P<0.05). At celiac diagnosis, Marsh histopathological stage can predict low BMD, which can develop into osteoporosis. Based on these data, the team suggests that doctors should consider evaluating bone biomarkers and conducting a dual X-ray absorptiometry exam in celiac patients over 30 years of age. Source: Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2017 Apr 27. doi: 10.1097/MEG.0000000000000880.
  4. Celiac.com 05/11/2017 - As research continues to show the remarkable nutritional advantages of bone broth, it is gaining a spotlight in the nutritional world, especially in nutrient focused diets like the paleo diet, clean eating, and more. But though the attention may be new, it is actually an age old dietary staple dating back to paleo era days when utilizing every part of animals was essential. Bone broth has remained a dietary staple around the world for generations. It is an exceptionally nutrient dense broth made by simmering the bones and connective tissues of animals. It's surprisingly easy to make and the benefits offered are astounding. If you are new to this wonder food read on to find out about bone broth benefits and the real truth about all it offers! Top Benefits of Bone Broth Bone and Ligament Health. As bones are simmered in the making of bone broth, key bone health minerals such as calcium and phosphorous are infused into the broth. Additionally, the breakdown of the connective tissue used for bone broth provides a natural source of glucosamine and chondroitin which supports joint health. Gut Health. The gelatin produced from animal collagen provides a healing effect for the GI tract. People starting a gluten free or paleo diet in hopes of calming down an inflamed digestive tract may especially appreciate this benefit. Immune Health. Turns out the old wives tale of chicken soup to cure illness holds some truth. The rich mineral content and in particular the amino acids in bone broth support a healthy immune system. Women's Health. Bone broth also offers help when it comes to women's hormones. This is because poor nutrient absorption is closely tied to hormonal health. When the gut is inflamed, nutrient absorption suffers. By healing the gut, the body can better regulate hormone levels. Anti-Aging. The collagen rich gelatin found in bone broth may just be the fountain of youth. Adding to this anti-aging effect, the amino acid proline further helps to give strong and shiny hair, skin, and nails. Tips to Making Bone Broth Yourself Quality Matters. To avoid the chemicals conventionally raised animals are exposed to and gain maximal nutritional benefits, opt for bones from grass-fed cows and/or free range chickens. Pick the Right Parts. The bones, ligaments, and cartilage used in bone broth each offer benefits. The bones give the broth vitamins and minerals while the ligaments and cartilage provide all important collagen as they break down. Opt to include knuckles as much as possible as they are particularly collagen rich. Go Slow. The secret to bone broth is going 'low and slow.' Cooking broth in a slow cooker on a lower heat setting for a longer period of time allows the collagen, vitamins, and nutrients to best be released into your broth. Add an Acid. Be sure to add a spoonful of an acid such as apple cider vinegar to help break down the connective tissue and collagen. This is a very simple approach to adding something extremely beneficial to just about anyone's diet or health routine.
  5. Celiac.com 12/19/2016 - Research conducted with high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HRpQCT) has documented substantial bone micro-architecture in premenopausal women with newly diagnosed celiac disease. A team of researchers recently set out to assess changes in bone micro-architecture after 1 year on a gluten-free diet in a cohort of pre-menopausal women. The research team included MB Zanchetta, V Longobardi, F Costa, G Longarini, RM Mazure, ML Moreno, H Vázquez, F Silveira, S Niveloni, E Smecuol, Temprano M de la Paz, F Massari, E Sugai, A González, EC Mauriño, C Bogado, JR Zanchetta, and JC Bai. They are variously affiliated with the Instituto de Diagnóstico e Investigaciones Metabólicas (IDIM), Buenos Aires, Argentina; the Sección Intestino Delgado, Departamento de Medicina at the Hospital de Gastroenterología "Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo” in Buenos Aires, Argentina; and with the Cátedra de Gastroenterología Facultad de Medicina and the Cátedra de Osteología y Metabolismo Mineral at the Universidad del Salvador in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Their team prospectively enrolled 31 consecutive females upon celiac diagnosis, and reassessed 26 of them after 1 year of gluten-free diet. All patients received HRpQCT scans of distal radius and tibia, areal BMD by DXA, and bone-specific parameters and celiac serology both times. The team then compared 1-year results against data from a control group of healthy pre-menopausal women of similar age and BMI in order to assess whether the micro-architectural parameters of treated celiac patients matched values expected for their age. Compared with baseline, the trabecular compartment in the distal radius and tibia showed marked improvement of trabecular density, trabecular/bone volume fraction [bV/TV] [p < 0.0001], and trabecular thickness [p = 0.0004]. Trabecular number remained stable in both regions. Cortical density increased only in the tibia (p = 0.0004). Cortical thickness decreased significantly in both sites (radius: p = 0.03; tibia: p = 0.05). DXA increased in all regions (lumbar spine [LS], p = 0.01; femoral neck [FN], p = 0.009; ultradistal [uD] radius, p = 0.001). Most parameters continued to be significantly lower than those of healthy controls. This prospective HRpQCT study showed that most trabecular parameters altered at celiac disease diagnosis improved significantly with a gluten-free diet, along with calcium and vitamin D supplementation. However, there were still significant differences with a control group of women of similar age and BMI. The team plans a prospective follow-up, in which they expect to be able to assess whether bone micro-architecture matches levels expected for a given patient's age. Source: J Bone Miner Res. 2016 Jul 22. doi: 10.1002/jbmr.2922.
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