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Found 113 results

  1. I have severe pain when I have pasta but not when I have bread. I have been tested for celiac disease numerous times as I have another auto immune disease and have had about 5 negative results over 4 years. Every doctor I get referred to does the celiac test before they consider trying anything else. I’ve had A camera and a CT scan (no problems found), and I am waiting for results for another test(malabsorption). Could it just be a simple intolerance? Is there something in pasta that could upset me more than bread or something that would just be in pasta and not bread?
  2. Celiac.com 09/24/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to investigate the degradation of gluten in rye sourdough products by means of a proline-specific peptidase. The research team included Theresa Walter, Herbert Wieser, and Peter Koehler, with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Lebensmittelchemie, Leibniz Institut in Freising, Germany. Their team monitored gluten content of rye sourdough during fermentation using competitive ELISA based on the R5 antibody. The team noted a decrease in gluten over time, but found that even prolonged fermentation did not bring gluten levels below 20 ppm requirement for gluten-free foods. Interestingly, they did find that Aspergillus niger prolyl endopeptidase (AN-PEP) extensively degraded gluten concentrations of up to 80,000 mg/kg in rye flour, rye sourdough, and sourdough starter under specific temperatures and pH values. Nor did the enzyme inactivate the microorganisms in the sourdough starter. Gluten-free rye flour alone or in combination with sourdough starter was used to produce gluten-free bread, which the team then assessed for its sensory characteristics. Whereas gluten-free sourdough bread lacked any of the favorable qualities of conventional rye bread, the replacement of sourdough by egg proteins yielded gluten-free bread comparable to the conventional rye, and with better qualities than bread made with naturally gluten-free ingredients. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using ANPEP treatment to produce high-quality gluten-free sourdough bread from originally gluten-containing cereals, such as rye. Rye products rendered gluten-free in this manner have the potential to increase the choice of high-quality foods for celiac patients. Source: European Food Research and TechnologyMarch 2015, Volume 240, Issue 3, pp 517–524
  3. Has anyone else had recent problems with Trader Joe's gluten free products? I have been eating their bread for the last few years and just literally the most recent loaf I opened seems to be making me sick EVERYDAY (last 5 days) a few hours after lunch. I don't eat breakfast and everything else in my lunch is exactly the same except for the newest loaf of bread. Last month I had tried their gluten free cookies and those were making me sick for a month until I pinpointed what was new I had started eating. I was getting a delayed reaction to those so it was very unclear if they were the problem but I won't buy them ever again and now I'm seriously considering staying away from all of their gluten free products since they aren't certified in any way.
  4. Scott Adams

    White Bread (Gluten-Free)

    This recipe has been modified from Bette Hagemans Butter Basted White Bread (More From the Gluten-Free Gourmet, page 38). Here it is: Combine 2 cups white rice flour, ½ cup potato starch flour, ½ cup tapioca flour, 2 ½ teaspoon xanthan gum, 2/3 cup dairy milk powder, 1 ½ teaspoon salt, 2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon sugar and 2 ¼ teaspoon saf-instant yeast granules thoroughly. In a separate bowl, combine 4 tablespoons melted butter, 1 cup warm water, 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar. Slowly add to dry mixture, then add 3 room temperature eggs, one at a time (the mix should feel a little warm). Beat on high for 2 minutes. Cover with plastic wrap and a towel, and rise until doubled (time varies). After the first rise, beat the dough again for 3 minutes on high. Fill a large loaf pan 2/3 full (can use extra dough in muffin tins) Let rise until slightly over top of pan; bake at 350 for 30-45 minutes, covering with alum foil after the first 10 minutes. Delicious, and freezes pretty well. This recipe comes to us from Marne L. Platt in New Jersey.
  5. Celiac.com 01/02/2018 - Sandwich lovers can get mighty particular about which breads make the best sandwich. There's plenty of room for opinion, and personal taste can include opinions on toasting versus non-toasting, seeded versus non-seeded, white versus whole grain, and on and on. That means that this list of gluten-free sandwich breads is not meant to be authoritative. It is not written in stone. In fact, it is subject to revision based on input and suggestions by our readers. That said, these are some of the stand-out gluten-free sandwich breads that we have tried. Bread Srsly Bread Srsly uses long fermentation of organic millet, sorghum and arrowroot with a wild sourdough culture to deliver a tasty gluten-free classic with a delightful sourdough tang. Okay, it's not pre-sliced, so technically it may not quality as sandwich bread, but I'm such a fan of Bread Srsly. Toast this bread up and it makes a lovely base for a sandwich. The tangy sourdough is perfect for ham, or tuna salad, or just a bout anything else you want on your sandwich. Breadsrsly.com Canyon Bakehouse Canyon Bakehouse makes a wide variety of gluten-free bread products. Canyon's gluten-free breads can also be stored at room temperature without becoming crumbly, making them perfect for sandwiches. Canyon. Breads are also excellent for grilled sandwiches. Certified gluten-free, Dairy Free, Soy Free, Nut Free, Non GMO. Canyonglutenfree.com Franz Seattle favorite Franz bakery makes a respectable sandwich bread. Franz makes gluten-free bread with a nice, chewy consistency that doesn't crumble, so you can make a sandwich with or without toasting. Great for lunches! Franzbakery.com Glutino Glutino gluten-free breads come in four styles: Cinnamon Raisin; Multigrain; Seeded and White. Glutino breads are light enough to eat right out of the bag. They also come in a nice, full size slices so you can make a proper sandwich. Glutino.com Rudi's Once found only in the frozen section, Rudi's now makes a soft, fluffy sliced bread that can be eaten right out of the bag. Rudi's keeps it simple with just two varieties of gluten-free fresh sliced bread, Original and Multigrain. Both are perfect for sandwiches as is, but toast up nicely. RudisBakery.com Schär Schär uses top quality rice, corn or buckwheat, along with sorghum, a traditional African grain, or quinoa, to make its long-fermented gluten-free sourdough sliced loaves and baguettes. Sourdough enzymes help the bread to stay fresh longer after baking, enrich the bread with vitamins, and eliminates the need for artificial preservatives. Schaer.com Trader Joe's Yes, Trader Joe's offers a gluten-free bread. Trader Joe's Gluten Free Whole Grain Bread is dairy, soy, nut, and gluten-free. It's made with brown rice flour, teff (a grass cultivated for grain), whole grain amaranth, whole grain sorghum (also in the grass family, and cultivated for grain), tapioca, potato, and flaxseed meal. According to Trader Joe's website, their Gluten Free Whole Grain Bread is “lower in fat, with fewer calories than its big-brand counterpart.” Traderjoes.com Three Bakers Three Bakers gluten-free sliced sandwich bread comes in four varieties: White Bread Whole Grain; 7 Ancient Grain Whole Grain Bread; Rye Style Whole Grain Bread; and MAXOMEGA™ Whole Grain AND 5 Seed Bread. Threebakers.com Udi's Gluten-Free White Light, airy and fiber-rich, Udi's popular sandwich loaf bread is made with all natural ingredients without added fillers. Udisglutenfree.com
  6. Scott Adams

    Corn Bread (Gluten-Free)

    This recipe comes to us from Janet Wolkenstein 1 ¼ cups yellow corn meal ½ cup white rice flour ¼ cup tapioca flour ¼ cup sugar 2 teaspoons baking powder ½ teaspoon salt 1 cup skim milk ¼ cup vegetable oil 1 egg, beaten Combine dry ingredients in a bowl and stir together until evenly mixed. Stir in milk, oil, and egg and mix just until dry ingredients are moistened. Pour batter into a greased 8 or 9 inch pan (or can use muffin tins if desired). Bake at 400 for 20-25 minutes or until light golden brown and wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean. Makes about 8-9 servings. You can substitute 1/3 cup dry milk and 1 cup water for the skim milk, or a gluten-free non-dairy milk substitute if needed.
  7. Celiac.com 03/09/2017 - It's cheaper, more nutritious, and properly delicious. Will gluten-free flour made from cockroaches change the way bread is made? There's a great article over at Munchies. It's about two scientists from the Federal University of Rio Grande in Brazil, who have developed flour made from ground cockroaches that contains 40 percent more protein than normal wheat flour. Oh, and it happens to be gluten-free. Excited yet? Grossed out? As part of their research, food engineering students Andressa Lucas and Lauren Menegon discovered a new way of producing cheaper, more nutritious food with the cockroach flour, since it contains a large amount of essential amino acids and some lipids and fatty acids as well—the keys for a balanced and healthy human diet. These cockroaches are not the ones we find running or flying in city sewers or drains. They are a particular species, Nauphoeta cinerea, to be precise, and procured from a specialized breeder, where they are hygienically produced and fed on fruits and vegetables to meet all hygiene requirements required by ANVISA, the Brazilian health surveillance agency. So, these are certified clean cockroaches, okay? And not only is the flour itself gluten-free, it's extremely high protein. Lucas and Menegon found that a bread containing just 10% cockroach flour presented a protein increase of 49.16 percent, when compared to bread made only with wheat flour. Also, at that ratio, the cockroach flour bread loaves keep the same flavor as their non-insect counterparts. So, given the high protein, and the desirable elastic qualities, it seems a natural for someone to test out some gluten-free breads that use cockroach flour. We promise you updates on these and other gluten-free stories. Meantime? Tell us what you think. It obviously sounds gross, but what if cockraoch flour makes good gluten-free bread? Are you in or out?
  8. Celiac.com 10/30/2014 - I have always been a fan of Steve Rice and his Authentic Foods line of gluten-free products. Recently I had the opportunity to try out his new Steve's Gluten-Free Bread Flour Blend, and I must say that I'm very excited about this amazing new flour blend, and the many possibilities that if offers. When Steve told me that he had been working for 20 years to perfect this mix, I knew that I was in for something very special, and my experiences with it were amazing. In the past I have tried many products billed as all purpose gluten-free flour mixes, but none are quite like this one. The directions are straightforward, and I only needed my own yeast packet, sugar, egg, butter and oil to make the mix. I new something magical was happening at the point where you first begin to mix everything together...see below: I know that Steve recommends using a mixer, but I don't have one. However, after mixing and kneading it for only a few minutes by hand it came together with the look and feel of a real gluten bread dough...it was very easy to work with, and in a very short time it looked like this: I used the dough to make the outstanding pizza below, which had a spongy, delicate crust. When making it I found that I could easily pick up the dough and work with it to form the gluten-free pizza crust. My wife used the remaining dough to make a cake, which came out light and fluffy, and it held together extremely well: Be sure to give this great new product a try. I'm sure that you too will be blown away by how great it is, and how many things you will be able to make with it using Steve's many recipes offered on his Web site.
  9. Celiac.com 04/12/2011 - Paul Seelig was found guilty today of 23 counts of obtaining property by false pretense after a two-week trial in Durham, NC. The jury found that he illegally represented baked goods as gluten-free, but they actually contained gluten. Mr. Seelig received an 11 year prison sentence for his crimes, which included the sickening of more than two dozen customers, one of whom had a premature delivery that was possibly caused by her involuntary gluten consumption. Seelig's company, Great Specialty Products, purchased regular gluten-containing items from companies in New Jersey such as Costco, and then repackaged them in his home kitchen and sold them as "gluten-free" at the NC State Fair, various street fairs and via home delivery. Seelig claimed that his baked items were homemade in his company's 150,000-square-foot commercial kitchen, and that his company raised its own grains on its 400-acre farm. High gluten levels were detected by both customers and investigators in Seelig's supposedly gluten-free bread, even though he claimed that he tested his bread weekly for gluten and found none. Mr. Seelig could not produce any of his test results at trial. Source: http://www.newsobserver.com/2011/04/12/1123724/bread-seller-lied-jurors-find.html
  10. Celiac.com 12/15/2017 - Is this some kind of cruel trick? As Subway makes a major announcement touting a gluten-free bread option in its restaurants across Canada, it offers a small disclaimer that the gluten's only going away for a limited time. For a limited time? What? Subway is the first fast food restaurant to carry gluten-free bread throughout Canada, but it will only do so "for a limited time?" You got that right. In plain text, clear as day, the Subway press release says that the company will offer its gluten-free option across Canada "for a limited time." Does that mean it will be permanent in some places and not in others? Does it mean they will bring the entire promotion to an end at some point? What does this mean for customers? What does it mean for people with celiac disease and gluten intolerance? In the short term, I guess it means get you're Canadian, and gluten-free, and looking for a gluten-free sub, Subway has you covered. For how long exactly? Stay tuned. Read more at: Restobiz.ca
  11. Flat Bread/Pancake/Pizza base 120g egg whites (about 4 large/jumbo whites) 14g coconut flour (about 2 tbsp) 1. Preheat pan on low heat and oil it 2. Whisk ingredients well add seasonings like sweetener for a sweet version, or herbs for what ever flavor you want (comment on what works and give ideas) 3. Pour in pan coating the bottom of the pan, cook covered for 4mins then flip it and cook another 2-3 mins. Very versatile recipe, I find pizza seasons and herbs make a pizza crust, a garlic/parsley/chive version makes a good flat bread, add a tbsp or 2 of sweetener like maple and a 1 tsp of baking powder for a bit of a pancake mix. Adding a 1/2-1tsp of psyllium husk can make it hold up better if you want something firmer also adjusting the flour up. Updates with testing, it works also with hemp flour/protein powder and makes firmer more grainy bread. I have been experimenting with different sized eggs, with the whites weight going from 120-160g the more whites in it the softer, fluffier the end product and more eggy. I have also experimenting with different seasonings. Flavor god seasonings or seasonings with salt will cause a bit of rise, but 1-2tsp gives great flavor I loved the pizza seasoning, Honey BBQ seasonings in it and using Spicely organics I have used Churichuri for a spicy herb, italian herb is alright, 1 tsp each of freeze dried chive, parsley and 1/4tsp garlic powder made a great one that pairs well with butter flavored coconut oil, Other ideas I have on my line up to try in them and have not yet, Just plain crushed red pepper, bit of adobe seasoning I think could be good, and I imagine using taco seasoning would be awesome. TIP to seasoning this put your egg whites and seasoning together whisk and leave in the fridge for 15-20 min to let it infuse, then add your flour whisk well to combine then cook. Also cooking the first side 4-5 mins til firm enough to flip, then 2-3mins just to finish it up, I then dump these on a plate. I cut them into 4ths or freeze whole, they reheat great on a pizza stone like a frozen pizza or in a toaster, I love putting toppings on, or dipping them in things. NOTE ingredients bought through the Thrive link get you a extra 25% off, great for gluten free shopping. Thrive Market http://thrv.me/gf25 https://www.luckyvitamin.com/p-435169-nutiva-organic-coconut-flour-3-lbs https://thrivemarket.com/nutiva-organic-coconut-flour
  12. Celiac.com 10/03/2017 - As people eat less processed foods, and more people adopt a gluten-free diet, manufacturers are selling less and less refined wheat flour, less bread, rolls, and cereals. Consumption of wheat is plummeting, and that has the people who grow wheat wondering what to do. Well, one thing wheat growers can do is hire researchers to study the problem in such a way that the logical conclusion is that foods made from refined grains, such as breads, rolls, and cereals, aren’t really that bad after all. And that seems to be what happened with a recent study funded by the Grain Foods Foundation, an industry group. Unsurprisingly, perhaps, the study, published last month in the journal Nutrients, calls things like breads, rolls, tortillas, and ready-to-eat cereals "meaningful contributors" of nutrients like thiamin, folate, iron, zinc, and niacin. The study notes that such foods are also low in added sugars and fats, which is not the case with many grain foods like baked goods. Rather than being independent, both authors of the study work for PR companies that help other companies, including major food and beverage companies, communicate the benefits of their products. While it’s true that many refined grain foods provide these nutrients, there are many other sources. For example, foods like white beans, lentils, spinach, dark chocolate, and tofu provide iron, while oysters, beef, baked beans, yogurt, and chickpeas provide zinc. Is bread bad for people? Mostly not. People with celiac disease need to eat gluten-free, and should probably make an extra effort to eat foods that are nutrient dense. For most folks bread is fine, but as with many foods, not all breads are equal. Look for whole-grain breads that are nutrient dense. Watch out for the added sugar, salt, and fat that come with many processed foods. And don’t be swayed by industry-funded studies that tell you to eat more of the product they are peddling. Read more at: Healthline.com
  13. Celiac.com 07/25/2017 - Enzymes are playing an increasing part in both the treatment of celiac disease, and in the manufacture of gluten-free baked goods. DSM recently showcased their new rice-based baker's enzyme, Bakezyme, at the annual meeting of Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) in Las Vegas. The product took DSM two years to develop and perfect, and promises to improve the softness and moistness of gluten-free bread. Bakezyme is so good, says DSM, and leaves gluten-free bread so soft and so moist that it can compete with wheat-based breads in texture. Designed to meet an array of manufacturer needs, Bakezyme is available in five different enzyme classes–amylase, protease, xylanase, glucose oxidase and amyloglucosidase. The version with amylase, an anti-staling enzyme, for example, will retain the softness for at least nine days. Fokke Van den Berg, DSM global business manager for baking says that Bakezyme grew out of DSM's efforts to tackle the two biggest consumer complaints about gluten-free bread, the hardness, and the dryness. While most baker's enzymes are derived from wheat, Bakezyme is made of fermentation-derived microorganisms added to rice flour, making it suitable for people with celiac disease and gluten intolerance. Because the enzymes are deactivated during baking, Bakezyme is regarded as a processing aid and thus is not required to be listed as an ingredient. DSM tested Bakezyme on two types of dough, oat and a mixture of potato and rice, with each requiring a slightly different formulation for similar results. Beyond the slight costs of ensuring that Bakezyme is gluten-free, its overall price is on par other enzyme ingredients, partly because such a small amount is needed. One kilo of Bakezyme is enough to produce 10,000 kilos of bread. The company expects most demand to come from the US and UK as well as other European countries, but the gluten-free trend is also spreading to Brazil, Turkey and Morocco, said Van den Berg. Read more at FoodNavigator.com.
  14. Has anyone heard about when Aldi's gluten-free bread will be available again? Its been off the shelves for a couple of months. Its inexpensive and my son's favorite.
  15. Celiac.com 03/08/2016 - I bake frequently using a variety of flours. This, gluten-free paleo bread with dried fruit and pecans is a recipe I devised when trying to create a sweeter bread with virtually no grains. That's right, no grains! I used almond butter in place of the majority of the flours which makes this paleo bread extremely hearty. It pairs very well with an afternoon tea or with some free-range scrambled eggs for a nourishing breakfast. Bread is one item that many people find hard to give up. Oprah also talks about how much she loves her bread! I don't feel anyone should have to give up flavor. I enjoy working up recipes that are tasty and healthy so we can all enjoy them while living a long healthy life. A truly high quality of life. I incorporated fresh (or home-roasted) nuts and dried fruit into my recipe but you can omit them if preferred. My celiac and paleo family enjoy every bite, including the nuts and fruit surprises in each and every bite. Children love the heartiness of this. The sooner flavors and textures are introduced to a child at the proper age, the more they can get accustomed to a variety as well as the multitude of nutrients in a recipe like this. I hope you enjoy! Ingredients: ¾ cup almond butter, mixed well 4 large eggs (room temp) ¼ cup tapioca flour ½ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1 teaspoon cider vinegar ¼ cup dried blueberries (sugar-free) ½ cup raisins (I used ¼ cup Golden and ¼ cup Thompson Seedless Raisins) ½ cup cranberries (I find it hard to locate sugar-free) Coconut oil for greasing pan Directions: Preheat oven to 350F degrees. Place rack in center of oven. Grease a loaf pan with coconut oil or oil of choice. In one bowl add the almond butter and eggs. Whip on low and then medium and then high, getting a really frothy thick mix. Lower the speed and add 1 teaspoon cider vinegar. Increase speed a few more seconds. In a second bowl combine the tapioca flour, salt, baking soda and cinnamon. Sift well. Add the second bowl with the dry ingredients to the first bowl with wet ingredients, folding in and mixing (do not over mix). Add in blueberries, raisins and cranberries. Pour into greased loaf pan and spread evenly. Optional: For a sweeter breakfast bread, I will add 3 tablespoons sugar-free raspberry preserves. Swirl in gently along the top of the bread creating a marbled effect. Immediately place in oven and bake for 25 minutes. Turn the baking pan around and bake for another 25 minutes. Test bread by placing a clean knife in center of loaf. If it comes out clean, it is done. If knife does not come out clean, turn down oven to 325 degrees. Bake for 5-15 minutes more, checking frequently with the knife test. Take out when moist but not wet – Paleo breads will continue to “bake” outside the oven. Homemade baked Paleo breads always taste better the next day as opposed to fresh “wheat” bread hot out of the oven–interesting! Let cool then remove from pan. NOTE: This bread freezes well.
  16. gluten confused

    Best gluten-free bread

    Please, I need your opinion. Which is the best gluten-free bread and where can it be found. I have already tried Rudis and Udi's. I really didn't like them. Thank you for your valuable comments.
  17. Celiac.com 07/31/2017 - For a time, it looked like gluten-free Catholics might be able to take full communion with special gluten-free wafers. But, gluten-free Catholics hoping to enjoy both the wine and the bread of a full communion had their hopes dashed this week, when the Church put the kibosh on gluten-free communion wafers. The decision was announced in a letter to bishops by Cardinal Robert Sarah, prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Sacraments, and read, in part: "The bread used in the celebration of the Most Holy Eucharistic Sacrifice must be unleavened, purely of wheat, and recently made so that there is no danger of decomposition...It follows therefore that bread made from another substance, even if it is grain, or if it is mixed with another substance different from wheat to such an extent that it would not commonly be considered wheat bread, does not constitute valid matter for confecting the Sacrifice and the Eucharistic Sacrament." He has said the bread can be low-gluten, but the wheat must contain enough protein for it to be made without additives. According to Roman Catholic doctrine, the bread and wine served at the Eucharist are converted into the body and blood of Christ through a process known as transubstantiation. Gluten-free Catholics will still be able to take communion, as the church holds that simply taking the wine is sufficient to receive communion. Still, the ruling, which must be followed by the 1.2 billion Catholics around the globe, is bound to disappoint numerous gluten-free members. Share your thoughts below. Source: Telegraph.co.uk
  18. Celiac.com 12/04/2015 - In what may be good news for gluten-free bread lovers, Panera Bread, the national-fast casual restaurant that centers around freshly baked goods, is now testing out a new products to bring in gluten-free customers. The company plans to test a gluten-free Rosemary Focaccia Roll in 15 stores in the Detroit area, and plans to take the product nation-wide in the second half of 2016. To be successful, the chain will have to succeed where many others have failed; they will have to produce a high-quality product that is tasty, commercially viable, and safe for people with celiac disease. Panera's effort is headed in part by the company's head baker Tom Gumpel, who says that there is currently "…little to no good-tasting gluten-free bread in this country, and I've eaten about every slice there is." To solve the quality/taste challenge, Panera has created a focaccia roll rather than a loaf of bread. The roll is made from white sorghum from Africa, and contains sprouted broccoli, chia, and flax seeds for better nutrition and improved bread texture. As far as folks with celiac disease are concerned, they will need to exercise some caution, because while Panera's bread is made in gluten-free facility and with gluten-free ingredients, it will be stored and served alongside the store's regular offerings, which may be an issue for more sensitive people. A review by Yahoo Food says that the bread is made with olive oil, and then basted with it, giving the bread a slightly greasy quality. The flavor becomes more nutty and rich with toasting, and may work best on breakfast or hot sandwiches. As for price, in the test region, the bread will cost $1.50 more as an option on a sandwich, 75 cents more as a side choice, and a $1 each if purchased retail. What do you think? Excited to try Panera's new gluten-free focaccia? Share your comments below. Read more at Yahoo.com
  19. Trying to make vegan, gluten free, bread in Denver, Colorado (mile high city). After trying many gluten-free flours, I am going back to Pamelas. Just bought a 25 pound bag from Amazon. I have always had trouble with my Pamala's bread falling, but it seems to work better than other alternatives I have tried. I am worried about using vegan egg substitutes, they have given me trouble with other bread recipes that I have tried. If anybody could give me any tips, I would sure appreciate it. Thanks in advance.
  20. Celiac.com 12/28/2012 - Sourdough bread is made by a long fermentation of dough using naturally occurring yeasts and lactobacilli. Compared with regular breads, sourdough usually has a sour taste due to the lactic acid produced by the lactobacilli. Sourdough fermentation helps improve bread quality by prolonging shelf life, increasing loaf volume, delaying staling, as well as by improving bread flavor and nutritional properties. However, sourdough isn't just good for making better bread. Recent studies show that sourdough fermentation can also speed gut healing in people with celiac disease at the start of a gluten-free diet. Over the past few years researchers have been experimenting with sourdough fermentation as a means for making traditional wheat bread safe for people with celiac disease. Recently, yet another study examined the safety of this process with great results. "While the study was small, it did show that individuals with celiac disease who ate specially prepared sourdough wheat bread over the course of 60 days experienced no ill effects." Obviously, larger and more detailed studies need to be carried out, but the early results are intriguing. In the meantime, sourdough bread made with gluten-free flours might be the best way for people with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivity to get the benefits of sourdough cultures, and to enjoy fresh, minimally processed bread. Of course, not everyone can bake their own sourdough bread. That's why I was happy to learn that more artisanal bread bakers are turning to baking their own delicious gluten-free sourdough to share with others. One of these small, artisanal bread makers is a local San Francisco baker named Sadie Scheffer, who runs a company called BreadSRSLY. Sadie bakes delicious long-fermented sourdough bread and other products, using gluten-free grains. She delivers most of her products by bicycle. Having sampled Sadie's bread, and I can say that it is some of the best sourdough bread I've tasted, gluten-free or not. It isdelicious, dense, and chewy sourdough bread that is perfect for toasting. The loaves are fermented for twelve hours before baking. Folks in San Francisco can find Sadie's delicious gluten-free sourdough bread at BiRite, Gluten Free Grocery and Other Avenues, and at breadsrsly.com. Until science establishes the safety of wheat-based sourdough for people with celiac disease, I think that long-fermented sourdough bread, made with gluten-free flour, represents the future of gluten-free bread for people with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivity. Here's a recipe for gluten-free sourdough starter. Other helpful links: Celiacs Can Say Yes To Sourdough Bread Study Finds Wheat-based Sourdough Bread Started with Selected Lactobacilli is Tolerated by Celiac Disease Patients Can Sourdough Fermentation Speed Intestinal Recovery in Celiac Patients at Start of Gluten-free Diet? Sourdough Bread Made from Wheat and Nontoxic Flours and Started with Selected Lactobacilli Is Tolerated in Celiac Sprue Patients The Art of Gluten-Free Sourdough Baking
  21. This recipe comes to us from Susan Carmack. Dry Ingredients: 2 ½ cups rice flour ½ cup tapioca flour 2 ½ teaspoons guar gum 1 tablespoon yeast 1 teaspoon salt Liquid Ingredients: 2 tablespoons honey 2 tablespoons olive oil or tallow 1 ½ - 2 cups water 1 teaspoon cider or rice vinegar Directions: Add liquid ingredients to dry ingredients in food processor. Process the mixture until it is smooth like a cake. Spoon it into a greased bread pan or muffin tins. Bake in oven at 350F - 30 min for bread and 15 minutes for the buns.
  22. Celiac.com 10/06/2016 - You do not need to be celiac to need to stay away from gluten. Wheat isn't just harmful to celiac or gluten-sensitive individuals. Did you know that just one slice of wheat bread raises one's blood sugar higher than 3 teaspoons of table sugar? That is equivalent to 12 grams of sugar! Talk about diabetes waiting to happen! I am very diligent in reading over even the gluten–free ingredients of products to ensure they are indeed gluten-free. I decided to start grabbing items off of the shelf to read the other listed ingredients as well. Wow, was I surprised! Sugar, high fructose corn syrup, corn syrup, fructose etc.! Sweetener and especially sugar are added to so many things; it is really horrible. No wonder Americans are addicted to it. We have many new diagnoses and physical disorders stemming from the standard American Diet, the "improper diet", not to mention a rapid rise in obesity statistics and diagnosed diabetes. Americans love bread, gluten-free or not. Go to a restaurant and what is the first thing brought to the table? Bread! Can you imagine being brought some cut up cucumbers and celery instead? Now THAT would be a nice change! I often ask for this by the way and suggest you do as well. Kids products are the worst! To give a tiny or growing body with a rapidly developing brain that needs proper nutrition all that junk, additives and unhealthy ingredient are a crime. If your child has been having trouble focusing in school, I highly advise you to look at the ingredients list of the food and snacks he or she eats and check out the children's menu at a restaurant. Gluten-free foods as well. You may not have any issues with gluten and wheat type bread but it is harming your body in one way or another and I strongly advise you to stay away from it and keep your family off of it too. I also highly suggest you start being diligent and read your gluten-free product's ingredients list. Going gluten-free is the first step as a diagnosed celiac or one who is gluten intolerant, but getting healthier or staying healthy is of utmost importance to a long and healthy lifestyle. Your body's future is in your hands.
  23. Karen Robertsons Amaranth Bread This article originally appeared in the Summer 2003 edition of Celiac.coms Scott-Free Newsletter. Gluten-free bread making the first few times is an incredibly frustrating experience that begs the question...is it really worth it? After my many trials I must say yes it is definitely worth it! We are now able to make an excellent bread that we can all enjoy. Being able to make bread allows my kids to take a sandwich to school, the fact that the bread is good (and looks good) is equally important to them. Since they cannot eat the hot lunch at school due to its "gluten in every bite" nature, it is important to have the option of sending a sandwich the children like (and will eat). Other kids taste the bread, they like it, and say hey this gluten-free diet is pretty good! The benefits to these exchanges are priceless. It took awhile to get to this point but one day I was lucky enough to meet Lee Tobin. He gave me a recipe (originally developed by Barbara Emch) and I had success! I then began to shape this recipe to accommodate the various alternative flours stocked in my pantry. The recipe is fool-proof and it tastes great...especially with teff, amaranth, or buckwheat flour. In this class you will learn how to make a perfect loaf of bread. I will review alternative flours and why I use them. You will learn the tricks for successful gluten-free bread making. And you will learn how to change the template recipe for your own specific needs. In an effort to provide you with a brief recipe for future use—all of the comments I would typically make during a cooking class will be found in the text that precedes the recipe. Why Use Alternative Flours? My experience has been that these flours simply make a superior gluten-free bread. Additionally, many celiacs struggle with weight gain after diagnosis and find their diet may lack important nutrients. As you adjust to the gluten-free diet it is a good time to understand how your body uses the food you eat. Simple carbohydrates are quickly digested and are broken down into simple sugar glucose. When the cells in your body need fuel they use this glucose. Extra glucose is converted into glycogen. If your body already has enough glycogen stored up, the glucose is turned into fat. The typical American diet is overloaded with simple carbs and the celiac diet is no exception. Complex carbohydrates not only take longer to digest but they provide slow consistent energy. You feel full longer and your body doesnt feel the wide fluctuations of blood sugar swings. Beans, whole grains, nut butters, oatmeal, soy, sweet potatoes, and vegetables are complex carbs. They provide needed vitamins, minerals, fiber, and consistent energy. Many celiacs lack B vitamins, calcium, iron, and other nutrients—why not get them from your baked goods and reap the benefits of complex carbs? We try to incorporate the alternative flours in most of our baking. When making sweet breads, cookies, bread, pizza crust, biscuits, and bread sticks I try to substitute about ½ of the flour called for in a recipe with a healthy alternative flour. Our favorites are teff, amaranth, brown rice, and buckwheat. Quinoa and millet flours can be substituted in the same fashion. Be sure you buy from manufacturers who provide pure, gluten-free flour—from the field all the way to the package. In our family we treat corn, carrots, potatoes, and white rice as if they were sweets (i.e. sugar = excess weight gain). They are all simple carbs as are most of the products made from them (chips, cereal, snacks). Here is a quick overview of the various healthy gluten-free flours and their attributes: Amaranth is a whole grain dating back to the time of the Aztecs. It is high in protein (15-18%), and contains more calcium, folic acid, Vitamin A, C, and E than most grains. The flavor is similar to that of graham crackers without the sweetness. Bean Flour is a light flour made from garbanzo and broad beans. When using this flour in your favorite recipes, replace the white sugar with brown or maple sugar (or combine with sorghum) to cut the bitter taste of the beans. Brown Rice Flour is milled from unpolished brown rice, and has a higher nutrient value than white rice flour. Since this flour contains bran, it has a shorter shelf life and should be refrigerated. As with white rice flour, it is best to combine brown rice flour with several other flours to avoid the grainy texture. Much higher than white rice in protein, fiber, zinc, folic acid, B vitamins, calcium and vitamin E (15 times the E in white rice). Buckwheat is the seed of a plant related to rhubarb. It is high in fiber, iron, and B vitamins. Great in many baked goods, pancakes & waffles too. Millet is a small round grain that is a major food source in Asia, North Africa, and India. A rich source of B vitamins. Nut Flours are high in protein and, used in small portions, enhance the taste of many baked goods. Finely ground nuts added to a recipe increases the protein content and allows for a better rise. It is a great substitute for non-fat dry milk powder in gluten-free recipes. We like it so much we always make the substitution. Keep refrigerated. Quinoa (keen-wah), a staple food of the Incas, is a complete protein containing all 8 amino acids as well as a fair amount of calcium and iron. High in some B vitamins and folic acid. Soy Flour has a nutty flavor, and is high in protein and fat. Best when used in small quantities in combination with other flours. Soy flour has a short shelf life. Teff is an ancient grain from Ethiopia, now grown in Idaho. It is always manufactured as a whole grain flour, since it is difficult to sift or separate. A good source of protein, calcium, iron, fiber, and B vitamins. Cross-contamination at the factory can cause diet compliance issues for the gluten intolerant. Call or write the manufacturers of your preferred flours to inquire about factory and field practices. Many people may wonder why I use just one recipe for bread. It is really a template that can be changed to suit your own tastes, preferences, or dietary needs. Changeable elements in the recipe: Eggs One of the most challenging substitutions, if you cannot tolerate eggs use Egg Replacer from Ener-G Foods (or try ground flax seeds as an egg replacement see recipe in flax seed section below) and be sure to use the almond flour instead of the non-fat, dry milk powder. The almond flour adds a great deal of flavor which could be helpful when you cant use eggs. If you read the nutritional label for almond flour it might scare you as the grams of fat are high, remember this is good fat and there is fiber-- both of which slow down sugar absorption in your body, which in turn helps control weight gain. The dry milk powder is high in sugar. Oil Vegetable oil is typically soybean oil and some people are sensitive to canola oil so safflower oil is a good alternative. Sugar I want to experiment with different forms of sugar to find a healthier alternative to the white refined sugar I use presently. Try turbinado sugar, a raw sugar that has been steam-cleaned. It has a delicate molasses flavor. Flour Four cups of flour are in the recipe. The proportions of flours used can be changed around until you find what is right for you. We use it in the way shown in the recipe but my goal is to experiment further and reduce the amount of tapioca flour and increase the healthier flours. Dry milk powder As seen above in the eggs section I now prefer to use almond flour instead of dry milk powder. The bread is much more flavorful and has a wonderful texture. Flax seed This seed has many health benefits such as high-quality protein, fiber, B and C vitamins, iron, and zinc, anti-cancer properties, omega-3 fatty acids, and many other benefits. To use as an egg substitute grind 2 tablespoons flaxseed and add 6 tablespoons boiling water, let set for 15 minutes then whisk with a fork-- this mixture will replace 2 eggs in a recipe. A clean coffee grinder works well to grind the small flaxseed. Cookware Its a good idea to have the proper cookware in your kitchen before attempting to make gluten-free bread. You must have a heavy-duty stand mixer like the Kitchenaid mixer. A heavy-duty mixer properly aerates the batter producing a lighter bread with a fine crumb and more height. You should also have a good quality loaf pan. It helps to know if your oven is running at the correct temperature (an inexpensive oven thermometer will tell you what adjustments you will need to make). Bread machines can be tricky with gluten-free bread, you can call the Celiac Hotline at Red Star Yeast for the most current bread machine recommendations 1.800.423.5422. Temperature In addition to knowing your oven temperature, realize that when the temperature of your home is warm, bread will rise quicker. The recipe includes some tricks to help your bread rise faster when your home is cool (as is generally the case in Seattle). Humidity Gluten-free flour absorbs moisture from the air so be sure to keep it sealed in its packaging and tightly cover any mixing bowls rather than allowing them to sit uncovered for any period of time. The moisture the flour absorbs from the air will affect your recipe. Amaranth Bread: Amaranth Bread makes one loaf. Feel free to substitute the amaranth flour with teff, buckwheat, or quinoa flour. Ingredients 3 large eggs (egg-free option see note below)* ¼ cup vegetable oil 1 teaspoon lemon juice 1½ cups amaranth flour 1½ cups tapioca starch flour 1 cup fine brown rice flour 2/3 cup instant non-fat dry milk powder (dairy-free: substitute with finely ground nuts or almond flour) 2 teaspoons xanthan gum 1 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons ground flax seed (optional) 1½ tablespoons active dry yeast 4 tablespoons sugar 1¼ cups warm water (105F-115F.) Bring all refrigerated ingredients to room temperature. Grease a 5 x 9-inch loaf pan. In the bowl of a stand mixer, combine eggs, oil, and lemon juice. In a separate medium bowl, combine flours, dry milk powder, xanthan gum, salt, flax seed, yeast and sugar. Pour ½ of the warm water into stand mixer and blend with egg mixture. Slowly add dry ingredients a little at a time until completely incorporated. Add remaining water, reserving some water if necessary. See note on humidity below. Mix batter on high speed for 3½ minutes, then pour into prepared pan. Batter will be thicker than a cake batter and nothing like the consistency of regular bread dough. Cover bread with foil and place in a cold oven. Set a pan of hot water on a lower shelf underneath the bread. Leave for 10 minutes with oven door closed. (This will cause the bread to rise quickly.) Remove bread from oven (do not uncover) and place in a warm place in the kitchen. Preheat oven to 400F. Bread will continue to rise as oven preheats. Uncover bread and bake for 10 minutes to brown the top. Cover bread with foil and continue to bake bread for 35-40 minutes. Turn bread out onto a cooling rack. When completely cooled, wrap tightly to maintain freshness for as long as possible. Tips: If humidity is high, reduce the amount of water in the recipe to avoid over rising. Many gluten-free bakers experience the frustrating situation in which a beautiful loaf of bread deflates once removed from the oven. You will need to experiment a little to get just the right amount of water in your bread depending on the humidity in the air. If in question, use less water than the recipe calls for. You may use rapid rise yeast instead of regular yeast. If doing so, eliminate the cold oven rise method with a pan of hot water, follow yeast package directions instead for rise time. Hamburger Buns Pour batter into English muffin rings, follow directions above. Bake for just 15 minutes. Once completely cooled these buns freeze well. Serve buns warmed, otherwise they will be crumbly. *Egg Substitution: grind 3 tablespoons flaxseed and add ½ cup + 1 tablespoon boiling water, let set for 15 minutes then whisk with a fork. Recipes from: Cooking Gluten-Free! A Food Lovers Collection of Chef and Family Recipes Without Gluten or Wheat Karen Robertson (Celiac Publishing, 2002)
  24. Celiac.com 08/19/2016 - Gwyneth Paltrow, Miley Cyrus and the clean-eating bloggers of Instagram have all helped propel gluten-free foods out of health-food stores and into the aisles of Whole Foods and Wal-Mart. Anyone who has ever tried a gluten-free bread or cake has likely found what sufferers of celiac disease have long known. They often don't taste very good. Gluten-free baked goods are often dry, crumbly and flat tasting. As long as there has been gluten-free bread, there has been mediocre gluten-free bread. This is not the fault of bakers. The problem is structural, chemical. Gluten, the protein found in wheat, rye, and barley, triggers adverse immune reactions in people with celiac disease. But that same gluten also has uniquely elastic properties that make it perfect for mixing with water, kneading into dough, and baking into chewy delicious bread. Gluten is what makes our breads spongy, and chewy, and delicious. Cereals and grains like rice, sorghum, buckwheat, which are often milled into gluten-free flours, lack this important component. Now two inventive Italian food scientists, Virna Cerne and Ombretta Polenghi, are being lauded for their isolation of a protein called zein, that is found in corn. Under the right temperature, humidity, and pH, zein forms an elastic network similar to gluten. These days, says Cerne, "gluten-free products include a lot of fiber but the fiber cannot be really elastic." Added to different gluten-free flours like rice or corn flour, Cerne adds, isolated zein protein "solves the problem of no elasticity." That means that products using zein protein can be used to develop gluten-free products with many of the same chewy, flaky attributes as bread and baked goods made from wheat flour. Currently, products using isolated zein protein are still in the research and development phase, but food scientists hope the abundance of low-priced corn will allow the protein to be made cheaply, and thus give rise to more affordable gluten-free alternatives. Cerne and her co-inventor Polenghi, who both work with Italian-based food company Dr Schär, say that their research remains focused on people with serious medical reasons to avoid gluten. Stay tuned to see how Cerne and Polenghi's work develops and what food breakthroughs might result from their efforts. Read more at Quartz.com.
  25. Hi! I fall into the category of super sensitive celiacs. Most of the time, I follow the Fasano gluten elimination diet and I do just fine on that diet. Occasionally, I have to travel and it would be very helpful to have a sandwich bread that I can purchase and eat without having a reaction. So far, I have reacted to Udi's and Schar. I'm wondering if anyone on the forum who is super sensitive has had any success with any variety of gluten free sandwich bread? Thanks!
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