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Found 7 results

  1. We are on day 6 of a gluten free challenge to diagnose an obvious case of inherited celiacs from my newly diagnosed DH. Yesterday my 20 month old had his first solid poo in his life. We sat there and stared at it with excitement! Of course this morning it was mushy again, but we have hope moving forward during this time of healing. I planned to breastfeed to the full recommendation of 24 months old and then wean (I, too, am now strictly gluten-free to not pass any on to him). My question is: does anyone know if breastmilk can help speed healing? Is there a typical amount of time that toddler healing takes? I’m willing to continue nursing through the entire healing process beyond 24 months old if it helps. However, I’m terrified of doubling the risk of his being “gluttened” by him being exposed to my diet too. Balancing act. BUT the benefits may outweigh the risks - and if they do I’ll keep breastfeeding the toddler for the foreseeable future. If they don’t then I need to sit back and analyze the best approach for best healing.
  2. My husband and I are wanting to grow our family soon . He has celiac. He was diagnosed very young and has been gluten-free ever since. We keep a gluten-free house for simplicity sake but since i don't have it i'm not completely gluten-free, just mostly. He carries both genes which to my understanding means our kids will have celiac (please! correct me if I'm wrong on that). My questions are: Do i need to be completely gluten-free during pregnancy? Do i need to be completely gluten-free while breastfeeding? I've read that celiac can cause difficulty getting pregnant and play into miscarriages but does that only apply if the mother is the one with celiac? Thanks in advance for any help! I've already been learning so much just reading around
  3. Hi, I am hoping to get some insight. I have a 13 month old daughter who has just been diagnosed with failure to thrive. She was born late and weighed 3.1 kilos. Quite normal. Up until about 7 months she was positing quite often (more then just spit up) and coughing incessantly . I brought her to the drs quite a few times because I was so worried about this dry cough.( 9 months they thought possibly Cystic Fibrosis but luckily thats been ruled out). Her poos were also quite explosive and slimy but I chalked this up to exclusively breastfeeding and her shots. Other than that she was a very content baby. She still is content and happy and meeting her milestones, except for her weight and height. She is the size of an average 7 month old. I exclusively breastfed her until about 7 months until when she managed to pick up a croissant dropped by another child and began teething on it. I decided to give her croissants thereafter along with the normal first baby foods. From that point on, she's stopped growing but that was unnoticed until about 9 months. Anyway, since I'm not gluten sensitive I kept eating gluten and breastfeeding her but I did take her off of gluten. I noticed that her poos thickened a bit sometimes but all the food that she did ingest comes out EXACTLY the way it looked going in. Even in color. I decided to mash half of her food and keep half cut up because she preferred the finger foods and even the mash came out the same color! From 9 months to 12 months I did strictly gluten-free for her and most of the time for myself but she never put on weight! She then was given a handful of cheerios by mistake and 20 minutes after she had a full body rash that lasted a week! (we cannot confirm if its from the wheat because she had tofu (soy) for the first time the night before. She then had the blood test but all came back negative though she was tested for gluten without having gluten....Finally we are currently seeing a paediatric GI specialist and he's asked me and her to stop eating Dairy and Gluten for 6 weeks. He suspects she might be celiac. MY QUESTION: Can my small amounts of eating gluten (4 small random servings a week) create failure to thrive in a celiac baby? As a side note, when I was pregnant with her I could not stomach gluten foods (bread, crackers, pasta, etc - any relation?) Thank you!!
  4. Celiac.com 04/19/2010 - Celiac disease is a vastly growing epidemic. 1 in 133 people have celiac disease, and only about 3% of those people are accurately diagnosed with celiac. Celiac can be a silent killer if left undiagnosed, and can present itself in the guise of irritable bowel syndrome, anemia, and colon cancer to name a few. That's why it is of utmost importance to diagnose celiac disease early on. Current studies are being conducted to determine when and why the onset of celiac occurs. In recent years epidemiological studies are indicating that the timing of the introduction of gluten, combined with breastfeeding patterns, may play an important role in the onset and development of celiac disease. It is very difficult to determine the true prevalence of celiac disease, due to the fact that celiac symptoms can be entirely asymptomatic, or painfully symptomatic, and the reasons for the variations in symptoms are still unknown. Individuals who test positive for the DQ2/8 antibody are genetically predisposed for celiac. However, when exposed to gluten, only about 4% of those predisposed individuals develop celiac. This finding has led researchers to recognize the importance of other genetic factors that must also be playing a role in the development of celiac disease. In recent years, remarkable scientific advances have been made concerning celiac disease. Seven additional candidate genes have recently been discovered to be possible contributors to celiac disease developments. Additionally, new findings suggest that early introduction of solid foods may also lead to development of gluten intolerance. In England, the incidence of celiac disease showed considerable decline in the 1970's following doctor recommendations to avoid adding cereals to formula diets, and to avoid the introduction of gluten to children before 4 months of age. A new ten-year study which evaluated the age at first introduction of gluten containing foods, highlighted stronger epidemiological evidence regarding the timing of introduction of gluten than previously documented. The study assessed 1,560 children between the ages of 3 and 7 months who were at risk for celiac disease or type 1 diabetes. The results of the study showed that out of 51 children who developed celiac disease autoimmunity (CDA), those who were exposed to gluten in the first 3 months of their lives had a 5-fold increased risk of CDA than those children who were exposed to gluten at 4 to 6 months of age. Moreover, children who ingested gluten for the first time at 7 months of age or after, showed an increased hazard ratio compared to children who were introduced to gluten at 4 to 6 months of age. The results of this study indicate a connection to gluten introduction and age introduced, thereby confirming the existence of a “window period” for gluten introduction. Celiac disease became a rising epidemic in Sweden in the mid 1980's. The influx of celiac patients under 2 years old was cause for concern, considering neighboring countries were seeing a decline in celiac patients during that same time period. The Swedish celiac epidemic pattern was eventually correlated to the new dietary guidelines, which as a result of the study, were later changed. The initial dietary guidelines mandated that infants were to be introduced to gluten only after they were weaned from breastfeeding, and larger amounts of gluten were given to the infants during this time. Further findings of the study showed that while the amount of gluten introduced during weaning of the children may play a critical role in the development and onset of CDA in genetically predisposed children, although it did not protect the children from asymptomatic celiac disease. This and other consequent studies strongly support the theory that the amount of gluten ingested during the introduction of gluten in the diet, also plays an important role in the onset of celiac disease. The direct correlation between celiac disease and breastfeeding is a hot topic. While many people have varying opinions of whether or not breastfeeding can contribute to the onset of celiac, new studies demonstrate some very important findings. In England, meta-analysis findings show strong evidence that children who were still breastfeeding during the time when gluten was introduced to their diet, had a 52% reduction risk of developing celiac disease. These findings conclude that breastfeeding during the time when gluten is introduced into the diet, can prevent many, if not most cases of symptomatic celiac disease. Additionally, Swedish observations showed that children that were breastfed at the first exposure to gluten, exhibited a lower risk of developing celiac disease than children that were formula fed. The amount of gluten introduced into the diet did not make a difference in these cases. Even if the amount of gluten was high, the risk of developing celiac disease was reduced. Furthermore, the risk was reduced even more if the child continued to breastfeed after gluten introduction. At Chicago University, students did a study that showed that children breastfed at the time gluten was introduced into their diet, were as likely to develop intestinal as extra-intestinal symptoms, and children who were not breastfeeding when gluten was introduced showed a higher chance of showing intestinal symptoms. These studies confirm the possibility of a “window” period for gluten introduction. This new evidence suggests that there is actually a “window” of time for gluten to be introduced into the diet, where there is a reduced risk of the subsequent development of celiac disease. As a result of these findings, the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) committee recommend avoidance of early and late introduction of gluten. The recommended age is older than 4 months of age, but younger than 7 months. It is also recommended to introduce gluten gradually, in small amounts and while your child is still nursing. Source: World J Gastroenterol 2010 April 28; 16(16): 1939-1942
  5. Celiac.com 04/12/2013 - A number of studies have suggested a connection between infant feeding patterns and the development or clinical expression of celiac disease. However, until recently, it remained unclear whether infant feeding actually affects the occurrence and/or the clinical presentation of celiac disease. A recent study that shows important differences in celiac disease rates between two groups of 12-year-olds indicates a possible strategy for preventing celiac disease. The notable difference between the two groups was simple infant feeding practices. The study findings suggest that gradual introduction of gluten in small amounts during ongoing breastfeeding provides protection against celiac disease. The study was conducted by Anneli Ivarsson, MD, PhD; Anna Myléus, MD, PhD; Fredrik Norström, PhD; Maria van der Pals, MD; Anna Rosén, MD, PhD; Lotta Högberg, MD, PhD; Lars Danielsson, MD; Britta Halvarsson, MD, PhD; Solveig Hammarroth, MD; Olle Hernell, MD, PhD; Eva Karlsson, MD; Lars Stenhammar, MD, PhD; Charlotta Webb, MD; Olof Sandström, MD, PhD; and Annelie Carlsson, MD, PhD. They are variously affiliated with the Departments of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health, Medical Biosciences, Clinical and Medical Genetics, and Clinical Sciences, Pediatrics at Umeå University in Umeå, Sweden; the Department of Pediatrics in Clinical Sciences at Skånes University Hospital at Lund University, in Lund, Sweden; the Pediatric Clinic of Norrköping Hospital in Norrköping, Sweden, the Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine in the Division of Pediatrics at Linköping University in Linköping, Sweden; the Pediatric Clinic of Norrtälje Hospital in Norrtälje, Sweden; the department of Pathology and Cytology of Aleris Medilab in Täby, Sweden; and the Pediatric Clinic of Växjö Hospital in Växjö, Sweden. To accomplish their goal, the team crafted a 2-phase cross-sectional screening study of 13,279 children from two separate birth groups: the first born during the Swedish celiac disease epidemic of 1993, and the second born in 1997, after the epidemic ended. The team investigated and compared the overall rates of celiac disease in the two groups, each at twelve years old, and compared the results against each group's ascertained infant feeding patterns. To report and confirm all previously diagnosed cases of celiac disease, they analyzed blood samples for serological markers of celiac disease, and referred all children with positive values for small intestinal biopsy. The team used questionnaires to determine infant feeding practices for both groups. They expressed prevalence comparisons as prevalence ratios, and found that the total prevalence of celiac disease was 29 in 1000 for the 1993 group, and and 22 in 1000 1997 group. Children born in 1997 substantially less likely to develop celiac disease compared with those born in 1993 (prevalence ratio: 0.75; 95% conï¬dence interval: 0.60–0.93; P = .01). Again, the difference between the groups was in infant feeding patterns. Specifically, the groups differed in the percentages of infants introduced to dietary gluten in small amounts during ongoing breastfeeding. Many more children in the 1997 group had gluten introduced into their diets in small amounts during ongoing breastfeeding, as compared to the 1993 group. Overall, the signiï¬cantly lower rates of celiac disease in the 1997 group indicate that gradual introduction of gluten-containing foods from 4 months of age, preferably during ongoing breastfeeding, offers a possible way to prevent or lower celiac disease risk. Source: Pediatrics 2013;131:e687–e694. doi: 10.1542/peds.2012-1015
  6. I had a cross-contamination exposure last night. It wasn't a bad one but I have a sour stomach today but no diarrhea. The only thing is Im breastfeeding my three week old. Should I use pumped milk for a day or two? How long if so? Will he be alright if I keep nursing him? Ive been nursing him since the exposure last night. Ive been trying to down a bunch of water to help. I don't have too much pumped reserved. And since its sunday my allergist is closed.
  7. Celiac.com 02/25/2011 - In many parts of the world, recommendations by World Health Organization (WHO) regarding child nutrition are regarded as the scientific standard. So, any time a major health organization comes out with recommendations that differ from those made by WHO, there is always much discussion about the science behind both sets of recommendations, and, occasionally, some intellectual and scientific jousting from both sides. That was the case recently, when a magazine called BMJ (formerly the British Medical Journal) published new and controversial recommendations regarding breastfeeding. According to an article by Susan Perry on MinnPost.com, those recommendations, the resulting criticism from WHO, and BMJ reviewers' response make some excellent points about issues of conflict of interest in research. The recommendations by BMJ suggest that breast milk should be supplemented with solid foods starting around the age of four months, two months earlier than currently recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). According to the reviewers, waiting to introduce solid foods increases a baby’s risk of developing anemia, food allergies and celiac disease. Those recommendations brought a strong response from WHO, which noted that its own decade-long no-solid-foods-until-six-months recommendation is “based on evidence that the early introduction of solid food to babies increases the risk of infection and disease.” The response from WHO then proceeds to refute each argument made by the BMJ reviewers. A response by Susan Perry to the spat appears on MinnPost.com, and makes some excellent points about issues of conflict of interest in research. Now, this debate between WHO and BMJ is a bigger deal in certain places than in others. The United States never officially adopted the WHO recommendation, as did the U.K. in 2003. Ironically, it seems that more American than British moms are following WHO standards. BMJ reviewers say that less than 1 percent of British mothers exclusively breastfeed their babies for six months. In the United States, that figure is 13 percent, as reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. However, that's a story for another day. But, a strong rebuttal from WHO is not the only problem facing the authors of the new BMJ review. A more pressing problem for BMJ study is that three of the four authors admit that they took funding within the past three years from companies that manufacture infant formula and baby food. Now, these researchers claim that their findings and recommendations are in no way influenced by their financial relationships with these companies: "My colleagues and I are independent pediatricians and scientists, funded by universities or hospitals, and we received no funding for doing this review other than our normal salaries,” review author, Mary Fewtrell, a child nutritionist at University College London told NatureNews reporter Natasha Gilbert. She adds that “all of us have had links with industry at some point. We are making no comment in our paper about what type of solid foods should be introduced — this could be home-prepared or commercial depending on the mum's choice — the main issue is that the food should be nutritionally adequate and safe." But financial connection between study authors and industry cannot fail to raise legitimate questions about the independence of study findings. Moreover, such a relationship creates a cloud of potential doubt over the nature of the findings. Indeed, the review itself indicates a strong desire within the baby food industry to get British health officials to change their current advice to mothers to breastfeed exclusively until six months if possible. Survey data shows that British mothers are slowly pushing back the age at which they introduce solid foods to their babies. Successive surveys since the 1970s show that nearly all UK infants receive solids by four months. The number in the 2000 survey, for example, was 85%. However, the 2005 figure drops to 51%, with mean age of introduction of solids at 19 weeks, a rise from 15 weeks in 2000. In view of the higher reported rates of exclusive breast feeding to six months elsewhere in the West (more than 30% in Hungary and Portugal, for example), it seems likely that the impact of the UK recommendation will be greater in 2010 than in 2005. It is timely to consider whether such trends could influence health outcomes. Susan Perry notes in her response that the study seems "extremely timely, therefore, for baby food companies to consider whether such trends are going to damage their bottom line — and to financially support, even if not always directly, the research efforts of "friendly" academics." That’s one example of why researchers who accept money from industry should be prepared to have their studies, methodologies, data and recommendations questioned — along with their motives. Source: MinnPost.com
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