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Found 17 results

  1. Celiac.com 02/16/2019 - Despite having the word 'wheat' in its name, pure buckwheat is gluten-free and safe for people with celiac disease. These light, fluffy, delicious buckwheat pancakes are a celebration of really good gluten-free cooking. They are sure to disappear at breakfast and leave lots of happy eaters in their wake. Ingredients: ¾ cup buckwheat flour ¾ cup almond flour (in a pinch, use all-purpose gluten-free flour, or just use all buckwheat flour) 3 tablespoons sugar ½ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon baking soda 3 tablespoons butter, melted 1 egg 1-2 cups buttermilk* ½ cup pecans, chopped, optional 1 tablespoon maple syrup, more to serve the pancakes Instructions: In a large bowl, whisk together flours, sugar, salt, baking soda. Pour the melted butter over the dry ingredients and start stirring. Beat the egg with a fork and stir it into half of the buttermilk. Add the buttermilk/egg mixture to the dry ingredients. Slowly add in the rest of the buttermilk,* maple syrup and vanilla, and mix until the batter is desired thickness. Try to err on the thick side, and thin with buttermilk as needed. *Note: If you don’t have any buttermilk on hand, you can make 1 cup of buttermilk substitute by adding 1 tablespoon of lemon juice or white vinegar to 1 cup of whole milk. You’ll need up to 2 cups for these pancakes. Make batter to desired thickness. Ladle about ¼ cup batter at a time onto an oiled, medium-hot griddle. Cook about 1-2 minutes until bubbles are well-formed around edges of pancakes, and bottom is desired brownness. Turn and cook other side, about 1-2 minutes until done. Serve with butter, and warm maple syrup. Note: Pecans make a delightful addition to these pancakes. Either add them to the batter, or serve them warm with finished pancakes.
  2. Celiac.com 10/18/2013 - Buckwheat, sometimes referred to as kasha, is often billed as a “tasty alternative to wheat.” That’s all well and good, but is it really gluten-free, and generally considered safe to eat for those who suffer from celiac disease or a gluten sensitivity? Whether or not buckwheat is tasty is a matter of opinion. However, with so much conflicting information available today, it can be hard to tell what’s gluten-free and what isn’t. Here’s the skinny on buckwheat. The Facts Good news! With its non-wheat status, buckwheat is safely gluten-free. Buckwheat and wheat are, come to find out, actually from completely different botanical families. Derived from the seeds of a flowering plant, buckwheat is not considered a grain or a cereal (though it may be called a pseudo-cereal—don’t let that scare you). Buckwheat, in all of its gluten-free glory, is actually closely related to rhubarb. In addition, it is an excellent source of fiber and nutrients. In particular, buckwheat groats (the small, triangular seeds), when cooked, offer 17 grams of dietary fiber or 68% of the daily requirement for a 2,000 calorie per day diet, as well as 22 grams of protein. Nutritionally beneficial and sometimes used in treating symptoms of type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure, buckwheat contains rutin. Rutin, a glycoside, has been known to strengthen capillary walls and improve circulation. Like many grains, buckwheat can sometimes be cross-contaminated with wheat during processing, transportation or if it is used as a rotational crop with wheat, so it is important to find non-cross contaminated source of buckwheat—make sure the one you use is certified gluten-free. Culinary Uses Buckwheat groats make a healthy side dish. Also, if you grind the small seeds of the buckwheat plant, you can make buckwheat flour for use in noodles, crepes, and many other gluten-free products. Using buckwheat flour in your cooking will give a strong nut taste to your dishes. You can also contribute raw buckwheat groats to recipes for cookies, cakes, granola, crackers, or any other gluten-free, bread-like item. If you’re feeling more creative, buckwheat makes a good binding agent, and becomes very gelatinous when soaked. If you soak, rinse, and then re-dry the groats you can produce a sort of buckwheat chip that is crunchy and can act as a nice side dish. When toasted, buckwheat becomes kasha. You can pick out kasha—vs. raw buckwheat—by the color; it’s a darker reddish-brown. In addition, kasha has a strong toasted-nut scent. Conversely, raw buckwheat groats are typically light brown or green and have no aroma. Buckwheat So, there you have it. You can use buckwheat and kasha safely as a nutritional, gluten-free alternative to wheat, or to create fun and tasty side dishes with buckwheat groats. If you’re looking to stock your pantry with all kinds of gluten-free wheat alternatives for your side dishes or even your main dishes, you can safely go for buckwheat in addition to cornmeal, millet, amaranth, cornstarch, garbanzo beans, arrowroot, quinoa or brown rice. Eating a gluten-free diet doesn’t mean you have to rely on the same old wheat alternative for every dish!
  3. Celiac.com 11/18/2017 - Just looking at its name, one might wonder if buckwheat is safe for people on a gluten-free diet. However, unlike its name, buckwheat does not naturally contain any wheat or gluten. As a result, buckwheat is considered safe for people with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet. Turns out that buckwheat and wheat are from different, unrelated botanical families. As with quinoa, buckwheat is the seed of a flowering plant, as such it is not considered a grain or a cereal. Buckwheat is actually closely related to rhubarb. It is an excellent source of fiber and nutrients. A serving of cooked buckwheat groats, the small triangular seeds, offers 17 grams of dietary fiber and 22 grams of protein. Buckwheat is not only nutritious, but it contains rutin, a compound shown to strengthen capillary walls and improve circulation. As such, buckwheat, is also regarded as beneficial for people with type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure. As with grains, buckwheat can become contaminated with wheat during processing, transportation or if it is grown in fields also used to grow wheat. To make sure your buckwheat is gluten-free, it is important to find certified gluten-free buckwheat. Also, remember that some products labled as buckwheat may include wheat flour, so double check to make sure your product is labled gluten-free. Otherwise, buckwheat is a healthy, nutritious gluten-free alternative for people with celiac disease.
  4. Celiac.com 07/08/2017 - The most frequently used materials in the baking industry are wheat, rye, and barley flours. However, due to the presence of gluten, they cannot be used for gluten-free food production. Gluten-free products are characterized by a low content of nutrients such as protein and minerals which are important for meeting normal physiological requirements. In addition, these products are readily available and the taste is far different from typical bread. [Marciniak-Åukasiak K., M. concentrate Skrzypacz gluten-free bread with amaranth flour in foods. Science. Technology. Quality, 2008, 4 (59), 131 - 140]. These issues raise the need for finding new raw materials for bread production, which would improve the nutritional value and sensory experience [Wolska P., CegliÅ„ska A., Dubicka A. 2010. Manufacture of bread for gluten-free cereal żurkach. FOOD. Science. Technology. Quality, 2010, 5 (72), 104 – 111]. Due to the low intake of foods rich in essential nutrients and minerals, people with celiac disease are seeking supplements to avoid deficiencies. Buckwheat, is an alternative raw material that can be used for production of gluten-free foods and has generated a growing interest. However, the scientific research regarding these crops is scarce [Zmijewski M. dough and bread quality wheat and buckwheat, depending on the technology food additives. Science. Technology. Quality, 2010, 5 (72), 93 - 103]. Common Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) although it does not require any complicated or unusual cultivation practices, it is rarely cultivated by farmers. Buckwheat is now grown in areas of Russia, China, Brazil, and Poland. The energy value of buckwheat is higher than the other grains such as wheat and rye. It is a good source of saccharides and proteins with well-balanced amino acid composition. It also contains high levels of lysine, fats, vitamins and minerals. It is also characterized by a significant amount of dietary fiber of varied fractional composition and biologically active compounds. Specific levels depend on the variety, anatomical part, climate, and growing conditions. These factors also effect the content of biologically active substances, such as flavonoids and routins, thought to have health promoting effects on the human body. Buckwheat is also the source of many compounds with antioxidant effects, which are: tocopherols, quercetin, kaempferol, and phenolic acids [Krzysztof Dziedzic et al, Content of antioxidants in buckwheat and products made in the processing, Food. Science. Technology. Quality, 2009, 6 (67), 81 – 90] The protein content of buckwheat is from 8.5 to 18.9%, depending on the species. Buckwheat protein has a high nutritional value. Its value is higher than pork protein, casein, fish meal and a bit lower than egg white. The scientific literature reports that extracts of buckwheat protein can successfully be used as a functional food additive for the treatment of diseases such as hypertension, obesity, cancer, and alcoholism. Scientists studying buckwheat demonstrate its beneficial effects on human health: buckwheat proteins prevent the formation of gallstones, they have the ability to bind vitamin B1, contribute to the prevention of colon cancer and breast cancer. In addition, buckwheat protein does not contain α-gliadin fraction, allowing buckwheat products to be successfully used in the production of food for people with celiac disease [M. Zmijewski, Jakość ciasta i chleba pszenno-gryczanego w zależnoÅ›ci od dodatków technologicznych żywność. Nauka. Technologia. Jakość, 2010, 5 (72), 93 – 103] Technological processes used in the production of buckwheat have a significant impact on the content of antioxidant compounds. The highest content of phenolic compounds are found in grains of buckwheat after roasting and the lowest in whole buckwheat groats. Buckwheat hulls have lower level of these compounds compared with buckwheat before the roasting process. Routin is an antioxidant compound present in the largest amounts in the above product. [Krzysztof Dziedzic et al, Content of antioxidants in buckwheat and products made in the processing, Food. Science. Technology. Quality, 2009, 6 (67), 81 – 90]. Manufacture of bread with only buckwheat flour is impossible due to the lack or very low level of gluten proteins. Recipes that use buckwheat flour are enriched with corn starch, which replaces wheat flour. Such raw materials compositions are used in the production of bread for people with celiac disease. Complete removal of wheat flour results in the dough deterioration and structure for baking. Crumb color changes from cream to gray, the taste and smell is unpleasant when compared with traditional bread. In order to improve these defects some additives are used from dairy products such as milk and whey, which improve the quality of the bread [Jurga R., 2008. Wykorzystanie mÄ…ki gryczanej przy produkcji chleba pszennego. Przegl. Zboż.--MÅ‚yn. 11: 18]. Products with roasted buckwheat flour stand out, with clear and distinct flavors of buckwheat, due to the higher content of dextrin, sugar and pectin [Wronkowska M., Soral-Åšmietana M., 2008. Buckwheat flour – a valuable component of gluten-free formulations. Pol. J. Food Nutr. Sci. 58: 59-6]. Studies indicate that gluten free bread with buckwheat added is characterized by an increased volume compared with traditional recipes. The result may be affected by other components in particular hydrocolloids. Loaves with more buckwheat content are characterized by greater height and size. The loaf shape will also vary depending on the addition of buckwheat flour [Krupa-Kozak Urszula et al J. Food Sci. Vol 29, 2011, No. 2: 103-108 Effect of Buckwheat Flour He Contents icroelements and Proteins in Gluten-Free Bread]. Enriching with common buckwheat flour, rich in protein and minerals, gives a positive effect on the content of important ingredients. As reported by the literature, add 10% buckwheat flour, by weight, to a typical bread recipe and you will double the content of protein in the product. Further increasing the buckwheat portion of the flour recipe resulted in further significant increases in protein content. Buckwheat flour also increases the copper and manganese content. Buckwheat grains are a good source of micronutrients and trace elements such as zinc, selenium, potassium, sodium, calcium, magnesium. Adding buckwheat also increases the amount of vitamins, especially of the B group. A valuable component of buckwheat grain is the flavonoid rutin. It has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. It seals blood vessels, prevents capillary fragility and reduces the risk of atherosclerosis [urszula Krupa-Kozak, Margaret and Wronka owska and Maria Soral-cream Czech J. Food Sci. Vol 29, 2011, No. 2: 103-108 Effect of Buckwheat Flour He Contents icroelements and Proteins in Gluten-Free Bread]. Buckwheat's high fiber content is also beneficial for the human body, a role that has only recently been appreciated. The fiber content of bright wheat flour is about 2.5%, while in buckwheat flour it is about 6.8%. Dietary fiber increases the volume of food intake, while not increasing the energy value, which is especially important for people who are overweight or obese. This substance reduces the feeling of hunger and acts as a filler in the gastrointestinal tract. Fiber also binds cholesterol, which indirectly reduces its level in the bloodstream. In addition, fiber absorbs harmful substances such as heavy metals, toxic components of plant antinutrients, and the products of their metabolism [Magdalena Fujarczuk, MirosÅ‚aw Å»mijewski Jakość pieczywa pszennego w zależnoÅ›ci od dodatku otrÄ…b pochodzÄ…cych z różnych odmian gryki żywność. Nauka. Technologia. Jakość, 2009, 6 (67), 91 – 101]. In buckwheat nuts, valuable antioxidants such as flavonoid compounds and phenolic acids can be detected, which obstruct free radical reactions and inhibit oxidative enzymes. Due to its high antioxidant capacity and a significant share of the total pool of flavonoids, phenolic compounds, buckwheat products can provide a valuable complementary component of the gluten free diet [WpÅ‚yw obróbki termicznej na skÅ‚ad chemiczny i wÅ‚aÅ›ciwoÅ›ci przeciwutleniajÄ…ce ziarniaków gryki; żywność. Nauka. Technologia. Jakość, 2007, 5 (54), 66 – 76 StempiÅ„ska Karolina et al] Traditional food can be enriched by buckwheat bran containing protein, fiber, B vitamins and minerals. Buckwheat may well be a functional food ingredient. It is also a noteworthy possibility to use buckwheat as a component of a prebiotic. The presence of flavonoids in buckwheat can be used by the pharmaceutical industry. In summary, buckwheat flour as an additive increases and improves the nutritional value and technological parameters of bakery products. It has a positive effect on the volume and shape of the loaves. Usage of these grains increases the flour's content of minerals such as copper, manganese, iron and zinc [Krupa-Kozak Urszula et al Buckwheat Flour Effect of a Microelements and Protein Contents in Gluten-Free Bread, Czech J. Food Sci. Vol 29, 2011, No. 2: 103-108]. However, when creating new products with health promoting features, we have to remember the consumer's preferences, especially in relation to the textural characteristics of bakery products. [Dziedzic K. et al 2010. The possibilities of using buckwheat in the production of functional foods. Science inc. Technol. 4, 2, # 28]
  5. Celiac.com 05/09/2016 - Exciting gluten-free news from Japan, where researchers say they have successfully sequenced the entire buckwheat genome. This is a big deal, because buckwheat flour offers certain advantages over numerous other gluten-free flours, especially in noodle making. Those familiar with buckwheat know that, despite its name, it contains no wheat or gluten, and is, in fact actually a kind of fruit. The sequencing of the buckwheat gene is exciting because it provides information necessary to develop new kinds of gluten-free noodles and other buckwheat-based foods that may be tastier and chewier than traditional gluten-free products. Yasuo Yasui of Kyoto University and colleagues have sequenced the full buckwheat genome for the first time, identifying genes which could be modified for improved cultivation capabilities and taste appeal. Buckwheat is a central ingredient in soba noodles -- a traditional Japanese favorite -- and is also used to make other noodles from China and Korea. In Italy, buckwheat is used in a dish called pizzoccheri, a type of short tagliatelle, a flat ribbon pasta, made with 80% buckwheat flour and 20% wheat flour. Elsewhere in Europe, buckwheat is used in French gallettes, and Slovenian struklji, While in other regions of the world it appears in pancakes and other foods. In the study, published in DNA Research, the Japanese team found genes related to "mochi-ness", which refers to the soft, chewy texture of foods like marshmallows or fresh bagels. Until now, scientists had not succeed in getting the distinctive 'mochi' texture with buckwheat," says Yasui. "Since we've found the genes that could give buckwheat this texture, I think we can hope to see foods, including soba noodles and doughy European foods, with radical new sensations appearing on the market in the near future,” Yasui adds. Some people are allergic to buckwheat, and Yasui says that the sequencing information may help to make buckwheat safe for those individuals as well. So, stay tuned to learn more about the future of buckwheat in crafting new, chewier noodles, and more. Source: kyoto-u.ac.jp
  6. One of the biggest complaints I have about the gluten-free food industry is that corn is usually brought in to fill the gaping whole left by the removal of wheat. Corn tastes great and all, but personally, I prefer a more nutritious wheat alternative whenever possible, so long as it still tastes good (which many do, e.g. quinoa and buckwheat). With Erewhon Buckwheat and Hemp Cereal, Attune Foods has crafted something of a gluten-free 'corn flakes' alternative (just to be clear, corn flakes are NOT gluten-free), which is made from two superfoods that we should all eat more of: buckwheat and hemp seed. Buckwheat is commonly found in top superfood lists because of its low glycemic index and high protein content. Hemp seed is a little less common in top superfood lists, perhaps because people associate it with cannabis (no, it will NOT get you high), but it is incredibly good for you. In fact, hemp is one of the only significant sources of gamma linoleic acid (a relatively rare essential fatty acid that helps boost metabolism). It is also worth mentioning that both buckwheat and hemp contain complete proteins, something that very few plants can boast (part of the beef I have with corn is that its protein is exceptionally low in lysine and tryptophan, making it a particularly incomplete protein). This mean vegetarians and vegans in particular need to start eating more hemp and/or buckwheat in order to maintain a healthy amino acid ratio. Since this is a product that clearly focuses on nutritional value, it is worth emphasizing that I enjoyed eating it. I love buckwheat, but I haven't eaten hemp seed in this quantity before, so I wasn't exactly sure what to expect. I'm not sure if it was the hemp seed, but something about this cereal had a really pleasant taste and aftertaste. I found that it went particularly well with coconut milk. The texture is a little bit 'tougher' than a product like corn flakes, but that is partially because buckwheat is so rich in insoluble fiber, and it really doesn't take anything away from the overall taste. Bottom line, this is one of the healthiest breakfast cereals you could be eating right now, gluten-free or not, and it tastes good! For more information and a $1 off coupon valid through 12/31/12, visit their website. Note: Articles that appear in the "Gluten-Free Food Reviews" section of this site are paid advertisements. For more information about this see our Advertising Page.
  7. Ramen are traditional Japanese-style noodle cakes which unfold while you cook them. King Soba's Organic Buckwheat Ramen are the healthiest and the best tasting ramen you can buy. It is made with only two ingredients, organic buckwheat flour and water, these ramen noodles can be used in a variety of ways – as a snack, in stir-fry dishes or mixed in with broth to provide taste and texture. Buckwheat comes from a plant that is in the rhubarb family (who would have known?) and it has a unique nutty flavor. You'll never eat the other kind of ramen again after you've tried these noodles from King Soba. For more information visit: http://www.glutenfreemall.com/catalog/king-soba-buckwheat-glutenfree-ramen-noodles-pack-p-2224.html Review written by Patricia Seeley.
  8. Can anyone tell me where on earth I can find safe buckwheat flour? We all need to bug the heck out of the folks at Bob's Red Mill so they'll do their buckwheat flour in their gluten free facility. In the meantime, where can I find safe flour? The King Arthur site has some but apparently it's actually the Pocono brand. Is that safe? And if I buy buckwheat groats is it hard to grind them into flour?
  9. So I bought the brand Pocono cream of buckwheat this weekend from my local Whole Foods market. The box was quite pricey. I am looking into getting the groats and grinding them in my coffee grinder to make my own 'diy cream of buckwheat.' My question is: if buying on Amazon.. should I go with the Pocono brand or Bob's? Anyone have a preference or think one is a safer option? Both are labeled gluten free. Or any other suggestions for brands or online vendors? Thanks!
  10. Celiac.com 10/05/2012 - Buckwheat flour significantly improves the nutrition and texture in gluten-free breads, according to a new study published in the journal Food Hydrocolloids. The study examines the role of buckwheat and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) in making gluten-free breads. The researchers point out that the food industry has cleared numerous formulation hurdles associated with removing gluten from dough, and created numerous new gluten-free products. However, they add, many gluten-free breads are still made with pure starches, "resulting in low technological and nutritional quality." The research team included M. Mariotti, M. Ambrogina Pagani and M. Lucisano. They are affiliated with the Department of Food Science and Technology and Microbiology (DiSTAM) at the University of Milan. In their study, they found that high levels of buckwheat flour improves both the texture and nutrition of gluten-free breads. Their findings showed that including up to 40% de-hulled buckwheat flour improved the leavening characteristics and overall quality of gluten-free breads. Because it is high in dietary fiber, the buckwheat flour increases dough viscosity, along with "the swelling and gelling properties of the buckwheat starch and the emulsion-forming and stabilizing properties of the globulin protein fraction,” the researchers wrote. The study also found that bread crumbs in gluten-free bread made with buckwheat flour and the food additive HPMC were softer than in gluten-free bread made without buckwheat flour. For their study, the research team evaluated ten bread formulas, 2 commercial, 8 experimental, with varying levels of buckwheat flours and HPMC. These formulas used both de-hulled and puffed buckwheat flour. The team based all experimental formulas on recipes from the two commercial samples. The formula that yielded the most favorable gluten-free bread included, 40% de-hulled buckwheat flour, 5% puffed buckwheat flour and 0.5% HPMC. Source: Journal of Food Hydrocolloids doi: 10.1016/j.foodhyd.2012.07.005
  11. HI there, I'm new to this board and I would like to start by saying that I have not been diagnosed with Celiac (neither has it been ruled out). I was referred to this site for the rich resources available about eating gluten free and as a support network with others dealing with the difficulty of living with the daily problems of living with such restrictions. I have, however, been diagnosed with Eosinophilic Esophagitis. Symptoms including, tightening of the airway, dysphagia, choking, gastrointestinal distress. I also had a rash that started around the same time these symptoms began. On and off, I couldn't correlate it to anything. I started with an upper gi. My physician said that if I wanted, before he did a scope, I could try an elimination diet. So for several weeks I went off of dairy, wheat, soy, nuts, seafood and eggs. (and I do mean religiously. I did not 'cheat' and read every package on every thing, nor did I eat out for fear of the unknown) I started adding these back into my diet slowly and watching for response. Everything was added back into my diet without issue. Shortly before I got to the last thing on the list, wheat, I had buckwheat with dinner. I had a reaction. I thought it was supposed to be safe! Then I tried quinoa. same issue. Then teff and millet. Issues there too. I still have yet to try wheat, but I fear the worst. When I was tested for allergy to wheat, it came back clear, but my physician said that I could have an intolerance which isn't the same as an allergy. I have no problem with rice or seeds. My question is, have any of you experienced this sort of issue? I am curious because I thought out of all those things I should be able to find an alternative to wheat. I have been using rice flour and chickpea, but I am having difficulty finding too much on the internet about intolerances or allergies with these grain substitutions. Any ideas or info would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!
  12. I'm in need of a birthday cake recipe or good one I can substitute in. Can haves: -buckwheat flour -eggs -vegetables of any sort -lard -sugar -baking soda -spices Can't haves: -any other type of flour, including ground nuts -non-chocolate preferred -dairy -grain-based oils -baking powder The only flour I have at my disposal is buckwheat. I usually wouldn't submit someone on their birthday to the strong flavor of buckwheat, but for who it's for, they'll probably like it, provided the recipe is a good one. I've found a recipe involving nut flour that looks good, so I'll go scouring the 1 store left that I have for safe, whole nuts to grind, but I'm not crossing my fingers. Looking for non-nut cake ideas! I've found a meringue topping requires shortening that I think I'll put lard in instead as an icing.
  13. Celiac.com 09/28/2010 - Buckwheat-enhanced gluten-free breads taste better than regular gluten-free breads, and have properties that may benefit people with celiac disease, according to a new study. Moreover, buckwheat-enhanced gluten-free flour could be used to create high quality, antioxidant rich bread products that benefit people with celiac disease and offer new market possibilities, says the team behind the study, M. Wronkowska, D. Zielinska, D. Szawara-Nowak, A. Troszynska, and leader M. Soral-Smietana of the Polish Academy of Sciences. Soral-Smietana notes that buckwheat's mineral content and antioxidant activity make it ideal for new buckwheat-enhanced gluten-free breads. Buckwheat flour contains high-quality proteins, and is rich in antioxidants and minerals such as, flavonoids, phenolic acids, B vitamins , and carotenoids. Because of these properties, Buckwheat has recently caught the attention of food scientists. In their study, the research team found that enriching gluten-free flour with 40 per cent buckwheat flour creates gluten-free bread “with more functional components and higher anti-oxidative and reducing capacities,” in addition to offering health benefits to people with celiac disease. To produce their buckwheat-enhanced gluten-free breads for the study, the team replaced between ten and 40 per cent of corn starch with flour made from common buckwheat Fagopyrum esculentum Moench. Corn starch is a common ingredient in gluten-free breads. They found that gluten-free bread enhanced with 40 per cent buckwheat flour had the highest antioxidant capacity and reducing capacity, and this was positively correlated with their total phenolic contents. The 40 per cent enhanced bread also demonstrated the highest overall sensory quality when compared to a gluten-free bread control. The team found that higher buckwheat concentrations made for higher levels of magnesium, phosphorus and potassium. From their results, they concluded that gluten-free bread formulated with 40 per cent buckwheat flour could be developed and dedicated to those people suffering from celiac disease. In addition to being healthier than current gluten-free breads, such bread would also likely taste better, because the “…overall sensory quality of buckwheat enhanced breads was significantly higher than that obtained for gluten-free bread.” Source: International Journal of Food Science and Technology - doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2621.2010.02375.x
  14. This recipe comes to us from Joe Ellison. Ingredients: 1 cup buckwheat flour mix (¼ cup buckwheat, ¼ cup mixed Montina flour, sorghum, and sweet rice flour) 1 tablespoon ground flax seed 1/8 teaspoon baking soda 2/3 teaspoon baking powder 1/2 teaspoon sugar 1/4 teaspoon kosher or sea salt 1 egg 7/8 cup plain kefir OR yogurt (I used to use Lifeway Prostokvasha or Bazarnyi) 3 tablespoons melted butter Directions: Mix dry ingredients together. Beat egg until light. Whisk in kefir. Add dry ingredients and whisk together. Whisk in melted butter. When the waffle iron is hot, pour about ¼ cup of batter on each waffle square (you may need more, depending on the size of your iron). Cook until steam a stop coming out of the edges of the iron, and the iron opens easily (about 7 minutes). Makes enough waffles for 2 adults
  15. This recipe comes to us from Joe Ellison. Ingredients: ½ cup gluten-free flour (¼ cup buckwheat, ¼ cup mixed Montina flour, sorghum, and sweet rice flour) 1 teaspoon ground flax seed 2/3 teaspoon baking powder Pinch kosher salt or sea salt ½ teaspoon sugar ½ teaspoon baking soda 1 egg 1 cup full fat gluten-free sour cream Directions: Mix the dry ingredients together. Beat the egg until light. Beat the sour cream into the egg. Add the dry ingredients and whisk together. When the waffle iron is hot, pour about ¼ cup of batter on each waffle square (you may need more, depending on the size of your iron). Cook until steam a stop coming out of the edges of the iron, and the iron opens easily (about 7 minutes). Makes enough waffles for 2 adults
  16. This recipe comes to us from Ingvald Söderholm. Ingredients: ¾ cup + 1 tablespoon water 1 teaspoon caraway seeds 3/5 teaspoon ground whole coriander ½ teaspoon fennel seeds 2 teaspoons linseeds ¼ cup + 3 tablespoons liquid sourdough 2 ¾ cups freshly ground buckwheat flour (in a blender) 1 teaspoon salt 2 teaspoons fruit sugar ¾ ounce compressed yeast 1 ½ tablespoons olive oil or rapeseed oil 1 tablespoon + 2 teaspoons tapioca flour 3 ½ tablespoons waterLiquid Sourdough Ingredients: 2 cups water ¾ cup buckwheat flour 8 teaspoons lactic acid fermented carrots OR white cabbage (sauerkraut) Directions: In a blender, process ingredients for the liquid sourdough, strain and pour into a glass jar and put the cap loosely on top. Set aside at room temperature for 3 days. Once a day, tighten cap and shake the jar. After fermentation put in refrigerator with tightened cap. In a blender, process liquid sourdough, spices and water. Pour the liquid dough into a large dough-mixing bowl. Add buckwheat flour and linseeds, and with a sturdy dough-scraper stir and knead until well combined. Set the bowl aside, covered with a baking towel, at room temperature for 14-15 hours. When fermentation of the dough is done, dissolve yeast, fruit sugar and salt in 1 tablespoon of lukewarm water. Pour the tapioca flour into a sauce-pan with 3 ½ tablespoons of cold water. Whisk until mixed, then heat up until it thickens and gets sticky and then let cool. Pour the yeast mixture and olive oil into the dough, then put the tapioca into, and, with the dough-scraper, knead until well combined. Put baking paper on a baking plate. Place 9 pats of dough on the plate, sift buckwheat flour onto them, press together each of them (with an un-perforated turner) forming rounds. You can use baking forms or not. Cover with a baking towel. Heat the oven, set to 125 F, for 2 minutes and then turn it off. Place the plate, still with the baking towel over it, on a lower shelf in the oven and let rise about 4 times its size. Heat the oven to 425 F, put in the plate, turn off the heat and bake for 5 minutes. Then turn on the oven again and bake until browning approximately 12 minutes. Tap off excess flour from the buns after baking. It is preferable to use spring water and organic ingredients if possible. Store in the freezer to retain freshness.
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