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Found 3 results

  1. Brand new here. I'm searching for all the help I can get, and, well... I figure you all are "experts" I have suspected for Years that my daughter is Gluten sensitive or allergic (and my husband as well, and my MIL because my daughter is SO much like her). The doctor I approached on the subject said to put her on a gluten free diet and if she does better, then I'll know. I want to have her tested before we go gluten-free, but I don't know how to ask for that (we've moved to a whole new state, so new drs) Her symptoms that make me suspicious are: Eczema that appeared at 2m old (but went away) and Dermatitis herperiformis that is very mild, toddler tummy that never went away, and off and on complaints of pain in her legs and feet; pain so bad she doesn't want to walk. She has been complaining for a couple days, so that is what has led me here. Granted, she is my fastest growing child... she's 7 and is now taller than her petite 9yr old sister (my mother in law was a tall woman, and so is my father so genes are at play), but the extra fat she carries (born with) I suspect has to do with gluten. My husband I suspect as well because he has (for as long as I've known him) body wide acne, became lactose intolerant (gas, cramps, diarrhea), and occasionally other foods will set off the irritated bowel type symptoms as well. He also gets psoriasis rash on his face and scalp. I wonder at times if gluten is the culprit for his mental health and sleep issues as well. Need to get him tested as well. We are on an extremely tight budget, and all the work needed to provide gluten free meals seems like a very daunting task. I'm quite overwhelmed by it, and it Really doesn't help that my family, Especially my husband, is stuck on the processed foods that taste "better". So with all that... Any advice would be helpful.... am I on the right track with these symptoms? Questions welcome. p.s. My mother was diagnosed by small intestinal biopsy, to have "the start of celiac damage" so she has been eating gluten-free since July. She pays for it dearly every time she consumes G now, with major gas, and cramps, etc. Unfortunately she is allergic to soy and has found that Quinoa makes her lips burn and swell so that's out the window. I too have begun reacting to soy with blisters and throat tightness, so changes are in store for me too.
  2. Hello there, I am a DH sufferer and have been (mostly) gluten-free for the past couple of years. However, I find it extremely easy to slip into eating it every now and then, especially since I do not get any extreme gastric problems, it is just my skin that suffers, and in any case it looks much better now than it did when I just got diagnosed. Nevertheless, it bothers me, and ultimately I want to be breakout-free. Yet there are so many obstacles to this, like all the relatives and friends not understanding why I would refuse to eat bread, cakes, etc and sometimes taking it as a personal insult if I do not try their cooking. In addition, I am between jobs now and struggling to get enough money for rent, so I often can't afford the more expensive gluten-free options and sometimes I just forget that a certain candy contains gluten. I was wondering a) if anyone has good tips on how to deal with relatives who are unsympathetic (my mother is still convinced my skin issues are results of a drug eruption/scratching, even though I have been off Adderall and painkillers for at least a year now), and How do I deal with my own "addiction"/indifference/weak will when it comes to certain tempting foods? I am doing much better now, but still slip every now and then and end up feeling guilty and that the money I spend on all the gluten-free foods is wasted, since my diet ends up contaminated anyways.
  3. Plan your meals: It sounds simple, but it’s one that is often ignored. Sit down before you do your weekly grocery run. Know what you are going to make for each meal including snacks. Find out what’s on sale before you make your weekly meal plan. Stick to the list when you shop! Develop a file of dependable, go to gluten-free recipes. My people report that, when they are short on time, that’s when they are likely to make extravagant purchases. Take the thinking and guess work out of meal planning by looking through your file. You can even write down the estimated cost of the meal. Eat foods that are naturally gluten free found at the regular grocery store. Corn tortillas are cheap and have many uses, including for sandwich wraps. Beans are a nutrient-rich starch substitute, as are lentils. Eat whole foods. Whether you are gluten-free or not, it is healthier not to eat packaged, processed foods. Just because a product is marked gluten free doesn’t mean it’s good for you. Processed gluten-free products often lack nutrients. Limit these to a couple times per week or less. Eat foods that are in season. This means they had to travel less far to reach your grocery store, therefore they will be cheaper. Grow your own. Learn how to can and/or jar the extras. Live in a cool climate? Some veggies can be started inside. Make a soup. Soups are filling, and they are a great way to use up items in the fridge. Eat more vegetarian and vegan meals. Eliminating meat from two dinners per week will save you quite a bit of money. Eat breakfast for dinner. Make a frittata – cook 3 strips of bacon in a skillet. Set aside and drain off most of the fat. Add diced onions. Cook for 5 minutes. Add diced red pepper. Cook another 5 minutes. Add a package of thawed, drained frozen spinach. Salt and pepper to taste. Add bacon back in. Beat 5 eggs and pour them all over the filling. Top with cheese and bake at 350 for 8 – 12 minutes, or until the eggs are set. Serves 2 – 3. Get creative. For thickening sauces or gravy, substitute equal amounts of cornstarch for flour. Mashed potato flakes also make a great, inexpensive thickener and binder in place of breadcrumbs. Xanthan gum is used in many gluten-free recipes to serve as the “glue” to hold the product together; use 2 tsp. unflavored gelatin to replace 1tsp. xanthum gum in some recipes such as cookies. Cornmeal or crushed potato chips can be substituted when a recipe calls for a coating or crunchy topping. Buy in bulk. Once you found something you like, save big by buying in a large quantity. The Gluten-Free Mall has bulk discounts and many other ways to save you money. See their "Shop Smart & Save Money!" section on the top-right corner of their site. Create or join a bulk buying group. Ask around at your local support group, or link up with local folks online. If you like the same products buy a bulk order and split it. Cook ahead and freeze meals in individual or family-size servings. If you are not someone that cooks and you are watching your budget, it makes sense to learn. Invest in a good vacuum food sealer. This will help keep leftovers fresh for longer = less waste. Bake 1-2 times per month. Things like Pizza crusts, bread, and pie crusts will freeze well if wrapped properly. Make gluten-free cookie dough from scratch and freeze in a roll. Cut and bake what you need. This will curb your desire to buy an expensive mix. Start a gluten-free dinner swap (like a holiday cookie swap). Get a few families to cook up a large quantity of gluten-free meals and swap them for variety! Join a food co-op. Co-ops are groups who use their purchasing power to get lower prices. Make your own blend of gluten-free flours ahead of time and store in an air tight container. To prevent contamination, purchase extra appliances (like a toaster) from Craig’s List or Goodwill. Track your purchases. Seeing it in black and white can be very revealing. Consult with your employer’s human resources department. Do they offer a flexible spending account (FSA) benefit? These accounts hold your money pre-tax for medical purchases. If so, will the FSA recognize gluten free food (and related shipping charges)? Get it in writing! If your employer doesn’t offer this benefit, ask them to look into it. This will save you about 30%. If you are not using an FSA and you spend a lot of money on medical expenses, consult with your accountant. Are a portion of your gluten-free food purchases tax deductible? Shipping charges often can be reimbursed from this account, as can mileage to and from specialty stores.