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Found 23 results

  1. I'm a natural born worrier and I always have been. I was diagnosed with celiacs when I was sixteen years old, and I'm nineteen now(going on twenty) Long story short, I've had my fair share of cheats between these times, not exactly eating gluten every day with every meal but just little things(like a doughnut or a roll or something ridiculous like that). I'm just now regretting all of it and realizing the severity of my disease. I've been going strictly gluten free for a while now, with a couple mess ups, like not knowing there's gluten in certain things(And paying for it later... ) But now, lately, things have been different. Usually, when I am glutened I have mild cramping, trouble when going to the restroom, mild gas, and fatigue. But lately I've been experiencing other symptoms(*TMI warning*) Things like extreme abdominal pain(Like I feel like I need to go the bathroom, throw up, and pass out all at once, this also only happens every now and then), weird stomach noises and I'm more gassy than usual, a tight feeling in my stomach/abdomen area, and I've noticed mucus in my stool on one occasion. I've read up on the cancers associated with celiacs and all of the symptoms religiously because I always assume worst case scenario. Should I really be worried? I'm scared that it could be "too late" for me and I could have cancer or have done irreversible damage to my body. I don't know if I'm being silly or not, I feel silly for taking this long to realize I need to be serious about my health and diet. I'm visiting my family doctor by the end of this week about these concerns but I'm worried about what he will say. Any feedback would be so much appreciated. Advice, reassurance, anything to keep me from worrying about this!
  2. Hello Everyone! I had a blood test back in December and had an ultrasound on January 2nd. This was all due to some weight loss after having gallbladder surgery in 2016. I just chalked it up to not wanting to eating fatty foods afterwards and having smaller portions. I wasn't too concerned, since I felt way better (I was a bit overweight before the surgery.) I had a bit of abdominal pain, but I was told that was normal after surgery. My mother was concerned and so I went to my doctor with her. My doctor said I probably had Irritable Bowel Syndrome (as a side affect from the gallbladder) and ordered me to get some blood work and ultrasound done. The doctor's office called and said we needed to talk about my tests, the receptionist said it wasn't bad. This happened on the day of the ultrasound, so of course I was worried! I scheduled for an appointment with my new doctor the next day (old one sadly retired, had her since I was born). I was nervous that night, but just chalked it up to it not being that serious. Next day I go to the doctor's and she tells me how clear my ultrasound was and how there were no blockages. Few! Next, she told me how my blood work came back normal (cholesterol, iron, hormones, ect), I was so elated! But then, she told me I tested positive for Celiac's Disease. My happiness drained away in an instant, I hadn't heard of the disease before, but knew it wasn't good. She then told me what it was and how it could cause cancers. Next, she said I needed to have a biopsy done to confirm it. I was shocked and afraid. I had thought it was just a vitamin deficiency, nothing this bad. Currently, I'm waiting to get a biopsy done and am remaining on gluten. The thing is, I'm pretty scared! Cancer has run in my family. It killed my Grandmother, my Uncle, and recently my Aunt this past summer. I know celiac disease causes your rates for certain intestinal cancers to go up, and that has me worried right now. I'm afraid I'll have lymphoma when I get my biopsy done. So I was wondering if my ultrasound and blood tests being fine meant I didn't have it. Just having some clarification would make me feel all the better right now. I could really use some kind words and encouragement.
  3. I was recently diagnosed as having celiac and to be honest the part I'm having the most trouble with isn't the change in food or lifestyle. I'm really upset about what I've read about the risk of cancer increasing with celiac disease. I think this is playing into my fears because I currently have lymph nodes all over my body-my Doctor says they are not considered swollen or concerning, but I don't usually feel nodes. The lymph nodes and horrible diarrhea for the last 3 weeks were what got me into the the doctor for lab work. My blood work came great so I'm wondering if anyone else experienced lymph nodes reacting when they found out they were celiac? Also how do you deal with anxiety surrounding the increased risk of cancer? Thanks!
  4. Celiac.com 06/16/2016 - Looking to be judged in the BBC's Masterchef cooking competition on the strength of her cooking alone, eventual winner Jane Devonshire kept word of her 10-year cancer fight away from the show's judges. Mrs Devonshire, a Hampshire mother-of-four, emerged triumphant from the final cook-off by beating her two younger male rivals with three winning dishes. However, the start of that hour-long finale offered a glimpse into the finalists' private lives, and disclosed, to a tearful television audience of almost six million viewers, that Mrs Devonshire had come close to death before learning three years ago she was in remission. Somehow, Devonshire managed to keep the news away from the show's judges, John Torode and Gregg Wallace. In fact, Devonshire only notified the production team when the finalists were flown to Mexico City for filming, and she felt obliged to disclose her medical history for insurance purposes. "I wanted to be judged only on the cooking," Mrs Devonshire told The Telegraph on Saturday, "Gregg and John didn't know. I didn't want any sympathy for the cancer. It wasn't relevant. Mrs Devonshire, in winning the competition, was the first to do so while offering menus that were almost entirely gluten-free. It's a genuine gluten-free tear jerker with a happy ending. Read more at the BBC.
  5. Celiac Ninja

    Possible Lymphoma Cancer Again...

    Well well well.... Not surprised. Nor scared. I may have cancer again. I am going to go WHOLE HIPPY NUTS THIS TIME! BooYAA! I'm allergic to pain killers: no surgery for me. Thank GOD! I'm not interested at all in chemo or radiation again. Been there done that. They will want to bone marrow transplant, I will not tolerate pain killers nor that transplant without painkillers. lol I am however FAR more aware of what to research, how much to supplement, how little and signs to look out for. I DO have a Naturopathic Doctor licensed and NOT a quake to monitor what I choose to do nutrition wise. Welcome, to the FIGHT! DING DING DING> IT'S ON! LOL Cancer shall meet it's worst enemy..... ME! BWAHAHAHHAHA Any-who, cancer is literally our own healthy cells becoming malignant (going astray/doing something they aren't programed to do by DNA). SO really we should care for our unhealthy cells. Treat them with the herbs, vitamins and minerals that are put here on the face of this earth in their best form by God Himself. I believe I will live as long as the good Messiah allows me to and I will be with Him when He wants me to. I'll just be more educated of the remedies available and be more responsible for the temple (my body) that He has given me. I should have never SLACKED on my immune supports when first diagnosed with Celiac. That was the stupidest mistake, I was worried about the money>which is now being spent ANYWAY. Sigh. Time to get back up in the saddle!
  6. A lot has happened since I last blogged. There are obivous reasons for me being tired; I have two kids under the age of 3, I'm a celiac, I've got hypoglycemia...yadda yadda. There are not so obvious reasons; chest pain at night, ache down the arm, lymphnodes swollen up neck (Cat scan confirmed), noduel on thyroid (cat scan confirmed), scar tissue in left cerebral hemisphere (MRI scan). My only concern is the swollen lymph nodes. The experience with lymph nodes was non hodgkins lymphoma. I seem to be an angry bear when I eat or drink sugary stuff. My neck seems to swell up more too. I get a head ache or migrane or am generally not with it. I had an frightening experience the other night, I don't know how it's related to the majority of the postings, but I woke up 2 hours after sleeping and the bone in my forearm was numb. The skin, the muscle was normal but the done inside was totally numb. The are ached real deep, so I just kept moving it like it were a normal numb foot or hand experience. After about a while it got better so I laid back down. I had been sleeping on my stomach with my head turned to one side. I don't normally sleep like that. So...my diet has changed based on those responses. I'm cutting the sugar way down. The sugar I get is from the Silk brand coconut milk (original flavor). I eat fruit, have organic gluten-free corn flake cereal. I'm just really wowing you now aren't I. lol I sure miss sugar. But it does not make me feel better. Not at all. I'm taking: gluten-free Women's NutriGold multi vitamins Swason's copper supplements with vegetable glaze (glaze keeps me from throwing them up) EnzymeScience Intolerance Complex Country Life's Ginseng Supreme Complex Vitamin K supplement when I need it *I need to have a regular exercise. It needs to be every week so that my system has time to work out junk in my lymphnodes. Drinking water and stressing out around the house or sitting on my rear doesn't flush the system like exercise does. Note: it is overwehlming to talk to doctors about my health history. They ask too many questions, I provide too much information. Makes for a depressing day for both people. There is no instant cure. It takes time, experience, knoweldge and lots of prayer. "Keep showing me Lord, I don't want to fall behind. You are my Great Healer, you'll get me there at the right time. Amen!" With more thought to this entry; I'm going to look up some various things that could be linked to the experiences with sugar and the arm bone falling asleep as well as my exhaustion. There is a possibility that I have leukemia. I'm appearing to have a majority of the symptoms except the blood test for white blood cell counts and the bone marrow test. I've had a bone marrow test back when I finished cancer treatments at the hospital, they warned me I would need to have a bone marrow transplant if I had to do chemo again. No thanks. I'd like to do what I can that is provided here on the earth and trust God for healing if He desires to heal me. There could be greater reason for me to suffer and bear my cross than just "find a cure! panic..." that's just futial. What's the purpose of a story that's helps educate others and build their faith if everyone found healing from mankind in the hospital? Hospitals have not always existed, neither have doctors. God has. So let's utilize His healing power and seriously show up this world's view of "cure".
  7. I absolutely adore my gastroenterologist. He is very dedicated to my well being. Unfortunately,I feel that at nearly every appointment that we have he always ends on the note of the possibility of lymphoma. He has a lot of diagnostic appointments for blood work and some barium imaging studies that he has me scheduled for over the next few months that are primarily to r/o cancer. Is this a common fear among celiac patients or should I be concerned? (I am already concerned actually I am just trying to see if this is common practice) Thanks Kortney
  8. Well well well.... Not surprised. Nor scared. I may have cancer again. I am going to go WHOLE HIPPY NUTS THIS TIME! BooYAA! I'm allergic to pain killers: no surgery for me. Thank GOD! I'm not interested at all in chemo or radiation again. Been there done that. They will want to bone marrow transplant, I will not tolerate pain killers nor that transplant without painkillers. lol I am however FAR more aware of what to research, how much to supplement, how little and signs to look out for. I DO have a Naturopathic Doctor licensed and NOT a quake to monitor what I choose to do nutrition wise. Welcome, to the FIGHT! DING DING DING> IT'S ON! LOL Cancer shall meet it's worst enemy..... ME! BWAHAHAHHAHA Any-who, cancer is literally our own healthy cells becoming malignant (going astray/doing something they aren't programed to do by DNA). SO really we should care for our unhealthy cells. Treat them with the herbs, vitamins and minerals that are put here on the face of this earth in their best form by God Himself. I believe I will live as long as the good Messiah allows me to and I will be with Him when He wants me to. I'll just be more educated of the remedies available and be more responsible for the temple (my body) that He has given me. I should have never SLACKED on my immune supports when first diagnosed with Celiac. That was the stupidest mistake, I was worried about the money>which is now being spent ANYWAY. Sigh. Time to get back up in the saddle!
  9. Celiac.com 04/23/2015 - Not only did a gluten-free diet and lifestyle changes NOT cure Australian "wellness" blogger Belle Gibson of terminal brain cancer, but the 23-year-old is admitting that she never actually had cancer in the first place. Gibson published a book and even created a popular cellphone app, "The Whole Pantry," and in the process made at least $300,000 from people who also hoped to cure cancer or other ailments by changing their diet. She had promised to donate a portion of those proceeds to cancer charity, but apparently kept all the money, which proved to be the catalyst for her subsequent downfall. Deeper scrutiny and investigation of Gibson's claim revealed that she never actually had cancer in the first place. Since being revealed as a fraudster, Gibson, 23, claimed that she had been taken in by a German "magnetic therapist" who told her she had cancer in various internal organs, which she never bothered to investigate further before starting a business based on how a change to a gluten-free diet had cured her. Now, Gibson is in the news for admitting to the Australian Women's Weekly that she never had brain cancer either. Is it worse that she claimed a gluten-free diet cured her cancer, or that she never had cancer in the first place? Sources: BBC The Frisky.
  10. I was diagnosed with Celiac about a month ago via blood work only. I've been reading up a lot on recovery and getting a bit concerned about healing. I have scheduled follow up blood work for about 3 months from now and the doctor will review at that point. I'm also meeting with a nutritionist next week. I'm still getting bouts of diarrhea about once a week, although overall I'm starting to feel better and my BMs are looking so much better these days for the most part. Do I need to request any follow up testing in regards to cancer, or other possible problems? I didn't get the endoscopy pre-diagnosis, and I'm not adding gluten back in at this point in order to test, but should I request one down the line to confirm I'm healing? Or is a change in the ttg or DGP enough? I'm scared I could have other problems (cancer) that no one ever caught, even if it's precancerous. I'm reading all these articles on how people with celiac might never heal. I'm 33, I just want to take all the precautions I can. Also considering giving up dairy, as I'm fearful that could be the reason behind my weekly diarrhea episodes, or it could be glutening, or just plain healing, I don't know....Is it normal to get diarrhea weekly if I'm only about a month into eating gluten-free? thanks in advance! Ami
  11. I was wondering if UNTREATED celiac disease can prevent cancer. I know this might sound stupid but bear with me. So here is my train of thought. If celiac disease is left untreated then the villi dont heal. If they dont heal then the body cannot grow and get nutrients. So if like a mole for ex. becomes cancerous it can not grow and spread because of the lack of nutrients. So maybe untreated celiac disease can maybe at least slow down cancer. I know this is really retarted but just tell me why this is not possible if its not or ur opinion.
  12. Hi, I'm a celiac and have been completely gluten free for two years now. I've been reading a lot of articles that discuss health problems that celiacs are more prone to than non-celiacs. What I did begin to notice is that none of the articles really say whether or not the celiacs that they mention who are prone to these health complications were maintaining a strict gluten free diet. I know that the gluten free diet does make a celiac less prone to future health problems like cancer and a whole bunch of other problems (I've been noticing more and more instances than not where the celiac is at more risk than the non-celiac), but is a celiac who is maintaining a strict gluten free diet still more prone to health problems such as cancer than someone who isn't a celiac? I guess I just want to know whether or not the disease has more complications down the road than just maintaining a gluten free diet for life (and, of course, the symptoms from ingesting gluten).
  13. My daughter was diagnosed with celiac disease at 2 years of age and we went on a whole house gluten-free diet at that time. When she was 12 she was diagnosed with AML leukemia. She underwent all the treatment protocols, including a bone marrow transplant from her full brother, who was a perfect match. He, however, was not celiac and after the transplant was fully engrafted she was retested for celiac disease (blood only) and showed none of the markers in the blood for celiac disease. Woohoo! Doctors were ecstatic, scientific papers were written. Everyone went back to the wheat based diet. That was 10 years ago and she is still cancer free. However, a couple years ago she developed seizure disorder and is on very strong and multiple medications for her seizures. She was also diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder, Aspergers, etc. We are of the thought that the celiac disease has returned, despite the transplant, and we have returned to the gluten-free diet. We have not had her retested for celiac disease but because there are other symptoms; the nausea, diarrhea, bloating, skin problems, etc that had been creeping in even before she started the medications for her seizures, we feel pretty certain she has a gluten issue again. I am asking if anyone has had a 'medically induced' remission from celiac disease and then a relapse, if it's possible, etc.? I also remember, way back when she was first diagnosed, I read a pamphlet that was published by a Canadian celiac group or foundation that specifically said there was a link between celiac disease and leukemia. I cleared out all my celiac disease reference materials when she was in remission and have never been able to confirm that again. Has anyone else heard or read of that connection?
  14. I am writing with a cautionary tale. When those of us with food sensitivities have a GI problem, our celiac/gluten sensitivity, lactose intolerance, etc are almost always the first thing we go to. For over a two year period I had become convinced that my gluten sensitivity was becoming worse and worse. By November of 2012 I was having episodes of severe pain in my upper abdomen that also were accompanied by fever and chills. (It had been about 20 years since I'd last had a temperature over 100°). I was starting to make absurd conclusions about where the gluten was coming from (given how strict I've been with my gluten-free diet for over 3 years--I am very very strict). Absent any reasonable gluten sources, I began suspecting I'd developed sensitivity to corn or soy. But the events seemed unrelated to my consumption of those substances. After an emergency room visit at the end of December and, and a miserable January, I finally got in to see an insightful GI doc, we began looking for other explanations. He scheduled some tests right away including an ultrasound (came back negative for disease or injury), and a CT scan with contrast dye and barium "smoothie". Much to my shock the radiologists found a tennis-ball sized mass in my mesentery. I am just recovering from the biopsy today to determine if it is malignant, but either way it will have to come out. So my recommendation is that, along with the usual questions about whether it might be another food sensitivity, it is very well to consider that if your symptoms become increasingly or inexplicably worse, it may be worth asking your doctor to do a thorough exam for other possibilities. Especially if they are accompanied by chills or fever.
  15. Celiac.com 01/18/2012 - A number of small studies have shown a connection between celiac disease and various gastrointestinal (GI) cancers, but the results haven't been corroborated by larger studies, or by blood and biopsy analysis of large populations. That means that researchers just haven't been able to say with certainty what the results of those smaller studies might mean about cancer risks for the larger population. Recently, a clinical team set out to assess GI cancer risks for a larger population. The study team included Peter Elfström, Fredrik Granath, Weimin Ye, and Jonas F. Ludvigsson. They assessed risk GI cancers by using data from large groups of patients with either celiac disease, inflammation, or latent celiac disease. They assessed data from 28,882 patients with celiac disease, all with villous atrophy, and Marsh scores of 3. They also assessed data for 12,680 patients with inflammation, all with Marsh scores of 1–2. They evaluated biopsy samples at 28 different pathology centers. They assessed a third group of 3705 patients with latent celiac disease, that is, with normal mucosa, but positive blood tests. The team then compared the results against data from an age- and sex-matched population. They found that 372 of the patients with celiac disease developed incident GI cancers, while 347 patients with inflammation, and 38 with latent celiac disease developed GI cancers. That means that the first year after diagnosis and initial biopsy, celiac disease carried a 5.95-times greater risk of incident GI cancer, with a 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.64–7.64). The hazard ratio for inflammation was 9.13 (95% CI, 7.19–11.6) and for latent celiac disease was 8.10 (95% CI, 4.69–14.0). After the first year, patients showed no significant increase in GI cancer risk. The HR for celiac disease was 1.07 (95% CI, 0.93–1.23), for inflammation it was 1.16 (95% CI, 0.98–1.37). HR for latent celiac disease it was 0.96 (95% CI, 0.56–1.66). The absolute risk for any GI cancer in people with celiac disease was 101/100,000 person-years, with an excess risk of 2/100,000 person-years. The results carried some relatively good news. That is, even though celiac disease, inflammation, and latent disease all increase a person's risk for GI cancers in the first year after diagnosis, there is no increase in risk beyond the first year. Source: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Volume 10, Issue 1 , Pages 30-36, January 2012
  16. Celiac.com 02/28/2011 - Celiac disease is associated with an increased risk of lymphoma and small bowel malignancy. Colorectal cancer is the most common gastrointestinal cancers in the United States, but most studies have not found no higher rates of colorectal cancer for people with celiac disease, compared with rates in the general population. The results of these studies might in fact be describing a true null relationship between celiac disease and colorectal cancers. However, the results may also be influenced by better health-care among patients with known celiac disease, particularly among those with gastroenterologists who are likely to perform screening colonoscopy. Because colonoscopy can decrease the incidence of colorectal cancer via removal of precancerous adenomas during the procedure, and because gastroenterologists usually follow such patients, a possible underlying increased risk of colorectal cancer in patients with celiac disease may remain undetected. The team of researchers sought to assess the underlying risk of colorectal cancer in patients with celiac disease by quantifying the relative prevalence of precancerous colorectal adenomas in these patients compared with patients without celiac disease in a cohort of individuals undergoing colonoscopy. The team included B. Lebwohl; E. Stavsky; A. I. Neugut; and P. H. R. Green. To isolate the association of celiac disease with colorectal adenomas, the team controlled for three important predictors of adenoma detection on colonoscopy: endoscopist, patient age and patient gender. They then identified all celiac disease patients who underwent colonoscopy at their institution during a 44-month period. They matched each celiac disease patient by age, gender and endoscopist, with non-celiac control subject. The team then compared the adenoma rates between these groups, and used multivariate analysis to assess the independent association of celiac disease with adenomas. The team isolated 180 patients with celiac disease and 346 control subjects. A total of 13% of celiac disease patients and 17% of controls (P = 0.20) showed at least one adenoma. Multivariate analysis showed that age (OR per year 1.04, 95% CI 1.02–1.07) and male gender (OR 2.33, 95% CI 1.36–3.98) were both associated with higher rates of adenoma. However, there were no higher adenoma rates among people with celiac disease (OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.41–1.34). The study provides strong support for the notion that celiac disease is not associated with higher rates of colorectal cancer. They conclude that the lack of increased rates of colorectal cancer is related to a true average risk of colorectal neoplasia, rather than reflecting higher colonoscopy and associated polyp removals among people with celiac disease. Source: Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics 2010;32(8):1037-1043.
  17. Celiac.com 05/13/2009 - People with silent celiac disease, those who test positive for celiac disease antibodies, yet show no clinical signs of the disease itself, do not face a higher risk for developing malignant cancers, according to results of a recent Finnish study. Previous studies done in the 1970s and 1980s indicated that patients with clinically recognized celiac disease face a higher risk for developing malignancies, Dr. Katri Kaukinen, of the University of Tampere, Finland, told reporters from Reuters Health. However, she explained, "it has not been known whether apparently clinically silent unrecognized cases also carry an increased risk of celiac disease-related complications, and thus whether the healthcare system should recognize and treat." In an effort to answer that question, Dr. Kaukinen led team of researchers in assessing whether adults with previously unrecognized screening-identified evidence of celiac disease have an increased risk of malignancies. Recent screening figures put the prevalence of celiac disease somewhere between 1% and 2% of the population, which means from 7 to 14 million Europeans with gluten intolerance. 75% to 90% of all the celiac disease remains undiagnosed due to absent or atypical symptoms. The team examined data from a Finnish population-based adult-representative cohort of 8000 subjects compiled from 1978 to 1980. In 2001, the researchers screened blood samples of people with no history of celiac disease or any malignancy (n = 6849) for immunoglobulin A (IgA) class tissue transglutaminase antibodies. They further screened positive samples for IgA class tissue transglutaminase antibodies (Celikey tTG) and for IgA endomysial antibodies (EMA). The team analyzed a total of 6849 blood samples. 565 samples showed positive Eu-tTG results. 202 of these subjects showed positive Celikey tTG results ((2.9%) while 73 showed positive EMA screens (1.1%). Just over 10% of the study subjects, a total of 694 participants, developed malignancies during the period of the study. Overall malignancy risk was no higher for celiac autoantibody-positive subjects. Adjusted for age and sex, the results showed that the relative risks were 0.91 for those who were Celikey tTG positive, and 0.67 and for those who were EMA positive. According to Dr. Kaukinen, the results seem to support the current clinical approach, and suggests that "earlier diagnosis of the disease through serological mass screening would not be beneficial in improving the prognosis of celiac disease as regards malignancies." However, before completely ruling out mass screening, Dr Kaukinen noted that it is important to pursue "further prognostic studies [on] mortality and fractures among earlier unrecognized celiac disease cases," as "[t]hese issues should be also addressed" before any official decisions are made regarding the use of mass blood screening for celiac disease. Gut 2009; 58:643-647.
  18. Celiac.com 02/17/2009 - Texas AgriLife Research scientist Dr. Nancy Turner has recently discovered that a microscopic compound commonly found in plant-based foods reduces inflammation and prevents the formation of cancerous lesions in the colon. The tiny molecule, called quercetin, is easily absorbed when people eat fruits and vegetables, and so requires no specialized supplements or drugs. Quercetin is a tiny, but powerful compound that is easily absorbed from onions, peppers, tomatoes and most other common produce. According to Turner, nearly all plant-based foods offer "some level of quercetin," including "fun things like wine." Previous laboratory research has shown quercetin to be effective in reducing rates of colon cancer, but Turner's study is the first to illuminate the mechanism by which quercetin works its magic. These results offer researchers another line of inquiry into other inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn's and celiac disease, as it's quite likely that quercetin can offer some measure of protection against those conditions as well. According to Turner, the levels of quercetin used in the study are comparable to those "achieved in diets around the world such as...the Mediterranean-style diets." As such, reaching such levels in American diets is "not an unachievable goal," she said. In the study, Turner's research team observed the responses of rats to quercetin-supplemented diets. Some of the rats were in the early stages of colon cancer formation, while others were cancer-free. In people, as in animal models, early colonic lesions represent some of the very first pre-cancerous changes that can be seen visually. These so called "aberrant crypts," are thought to mark or predict tumor formation. Earlier studies have shown quercetin to reduce the number of these crypts, but Turner "wanted to know how it might be protecting." Cancer is commonly understood as uncontrolled cell growth, but researchers are now realizing that the normal action of cell death, a process called "apoptosis," plays a crucial role in allowing cancer to develop. Healthy bodies generally maintain equilibrium between the generation of new cells and sloughing off cells that have completed their job. Quercetin seems to play a beneficial role in both cases. It decreases the number of cells being generated in the colon [and] increases the number of cells that were undergoing apoptosis. In all, quercetin helps to maintain a normal number of cells. The research team then turned its attention to the relatively new discovery that inflammation is one of the prime instigators of colon cancer. The team focused on two enzymes, called Cox-1 and Cox-2. Cox-1 is a standard protein that the body usually exhibits. But Cox-2 has a potential role in a number of diseases. Turner explains that Cox-2 is an "inducible protein that is expressed in the body when there is some kind of external stimulus to a cell." Scientists consider high levels of Cox-2 "as being a bad thing." Research shows that not only are elevated levels of Cox-2 present in colon cancer, but that the Cox-1 levels become elevated before Cox-2 levels rise. According to Turner, it seems that Cox-1 exerts some sort of influence over whether Cox-2 expression. Both the control groups and the carcinogen-injected groups that consumed dietary quercetin had lower levels of both Cox-1 and Cox-2, suggests that there may be chance for quercetin to prevent tumor growth. Clearly, further study is needed to better understand the links. But Turner encourages people to consume lots of fruits and vegetables. She points out that, in addition promising benefits for colon cancer, quercetin has demonstrated positive influence in fighting other chronic ailments such as cardiovascular disease. *Turner's research was funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture . Source: http://agnews.tamu.edu/showstory.php?id=972
  19. Celiac.com 08/14/2007 - It has long been documented that there is a connection between celiac disease and neoplasm. In fact, in the 1960s, a population-based study reported a 100-fold increase in risk of non-Hodgkins lymphoma in patients with celiac disease. It has also been shown that people with celiac disease are at greater risk for developing small bowel adenocarcinoma. Also, studies have shown an increased mortality rate from cancer among celiac patients, and there is mounting, but not conclusive evidence that a gluten-free diet provides a measure of protection against the development of malignancies. Strangely, several studies have documented a lower risk of breast cancer among celiac patients. However, to date, very little is known about the associated factors, particularly with regard to the development of gastrointestinal malignancies and their corresponding risk levels. A study recently published in BMC Gastroenterology documents the efforts of a team of Italian doctors to evaluate the risks of developing various types of gastrointestinal neoplasms associated with delayed diagnosis of celiac disease and the resulting consumption of gluten over time. The team was made up of doctors Marco Silano; Umberto Volta; Anna Maria Mecchia; Mariarita Dessì; Rita Di Benedetto; and Massimo De Vincenzi. The team studied a group of 1,968 celiac patients from 20 GE referral centers between 01 January 1982 & 31 March 2005. Study Shows Higher Rates of Gastrointestinal Malignancy that Increase with Age in Patients with Delayed Diagnosis of Celiac Disease According to the results of the study celiac patients have an increased risk of developing cancer which corresponds directly with the age of diagnosis of celiac disease. This increased risk applies to gastro-intestinal malignancies. An accurate screening for tumors should be performed in patients diagnosed with celiac disease in adulthood. On average, the mean age of celiac patients who developed a neoplasm, either sooner or later, was 47.6 +/- 10.2 years, compared with 28.6 =/- 18.2 years in those did not develop neoplasm. BMC Gastroenterology 2007, 7:8 (9 March 2007) health writer who lives in San Francisco and is a frequent author of articles for Celiac.com.
  20. Celiac.com 12/11/2006 – A retrospective cohort study presented by Gunnar Midhagen with his Doctoral and Licentiate Theses at Linköping University, Sweden, found that those with diagnosed celiac disease actually have a 47% lower cancer risk than the normal population, presumably because a majority of them follow a gluten-free diet (although the study did not address this). The study also found that those with celiac disease have a 38% higher mortality rate than the normal population, which is due to a 48% higher rate of death due to ischemic heart disease. It would be interesting to determine what causes the higher heart disease risk, and I would speculate that it has to do with fat absorption—specifically the decreased ability of those with celiac disease to absorb omega-3 fatty acids. More on this topic can be found in this article: Heart Failure, Cardiomyopathy and Celiac Disease By Laura Yick Here is the abstract of the study: High Mortality in Ischemic Heart Disease in Patients with Celiac Disease Gunnar Midhagen Department of Internal Medicine, Skovde Hospital, Skovde, Sweden INTRODUCTION: "Previous reports about increased risks of malignancies and mortality in patients with celiac disease have been criticized as skewed by selection bias, because they emanate from referral centers. Recent register based studies indicate lower risks, but are contingent on complete registration." AIMS & METHODS: "Our aim was to perform a retrospective cohort study of all celiac disease patients residing in two Swedish counties and evaluate the risks of malignancies and excess mortality. All diagnosed celiac disease patients 15 years or older who were residents of the örebro and Linköping hospitals primary catchment areas on 31 Dec. 1986 were identified and followed up for at least 15 years. All celiac disease patients were checked against the Swedish hospital inpatient register. Standardized mortality ratios (SMR) and standard incidence ratios of cancer (SIR) were calculated." RESULTS: "There was a 47 percent lower risk of all malignancies in our total celiac population SIR=0.53 (95% C.I. 0.31-0.83) as compared with the general population. Total mortality was increased by 38% (SMR 1.38, 95% C.I. 1.08-1.75) as compared with the general population and was most pronounced in patients over 65 years (SMR 1.46).This was mainly explained by a 48% increased death rate in ischemic heart disease, significant in patients over 65 years (SMR 1.58, 95% C.I. 1.00-2.06). " CONCLUSION: "In a population based setting including all patients with celiac disease, there was no increased risk of malignancies. However, this study confirms an excess mortality risk, which appears to be attributable to ischemic heart disease mainly in patients over 65 years of age."
  21. Celiac.com 11/07/2002 - The results of a recent study conducted by researchers in Sweden indicate that the overall cancer risk of people with celiac disease or dermatitis herpetiformis is higher than that of the normal population, but lower than other studies have reported. Further, the overall risk is lower in children and higher in adults, and the risk "declined with time and eventually reached unity," presumably because most of the subjects followed a gluten-free diet. Here is the Medline abstract for the study: Gastroenterology 2002 Nov;123(5):1428-1435 Links Askling J, Linet M, Gridley G, Halstensen TS, Ekstrom K, Ekbom A. Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute/Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland; Institute of Oral Biology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; and the Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. BACKGROUND & AIMS: Studies of cancer risk in celiac disease (celiac disease) or dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) indicate increased risks for malignant lymphoma and occasionally other neoplasms, but are characterized by small numbers, lack of systematic cancer assessment, and subjects identified from referral institutions. METHODS: By using Swedish population-based inpatient and cancer registry data, we followed-up 12,000 subjects with celiac disease or DH, and evaluated cancer incidence by using standardized incidence ratios (SIR). RESULTS: Adults (but not children and adolescents) with celiac disease had an elevated overall risk for cancer (SIR = 1.3) that declined with time and eventually reached unity. Elevated risks were found for malignant lymphomas, small-intestinal, oropharyngeal, esophageal, large intestinal, hepatobiliary, and pancreatic carcinomas. The excess occurrence of malignant lymphomas was confined to adults, decreased with time of follow-up evaluation, and decreased over successive calendar periods. Decreased risks were found for breast cancer. Subjects with DH had a slightly increased overall cancer risk (SIR = 1.2) owing to excesses of malignant lymphoma and leukemia, but no increases of gastrointestinal carcinomas. CONCLUSIONS: Albeit increased, the relative risks for lymphomas and gastrointestinal cancers in this study are lower (and declining) than in most previous reports. The overall cancer risk is only moderately increased, and non-elevated during childhood and adolescence. PMID: 12404215 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
  22. Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol 2000;12:645-648. Celiac.com 08/13/2000 - According to Drs. Simon D. Johnston and R.G. Peter Watson from Royal Victoria Hospital in Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK, the incidence of undiagnosed celiac disease is higher among those with small bowel lymphoma, as reported in the June issue of the European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. According to the researchers: It is not clear whether the increased risk of small bowel lymphoma seen in typical celiac disease also applies to unrecognized or screening-detected celiac patients. To find an answer, they retrospectively identified 69 cases of small-bowel adenocarcinoma and 69 cases of small-bowel lymphoma from five pathology laboratories in Northern Ireland. From a group composed of one patient with known celiac disease, and 12 with previously unrecognized celiac disease, the clinical presentation of adenocarcinoma and lymphoma patients was similar, but perforation was much more common among lymphoma patients. Further, 13 of the lymphoma patients, but none of the adenocarcinoma patients, had villous atrophy at a distant site, all of which were enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphomas. According to the researchers: Comparing the small-bowel lymphoma group to our random sample of the general Northern Ireland population as controls, the odds ratio of 15.72 for unrecognized celiac disease in the small-bowel lymphoma group, clearly indicates that there is an increased risk of unrecognized celiac disease among small-bowel lymphoma patients. Additionally, (s)ince a protective role for a strict gluten-free diet has been demonstrated, it follows that every effort should be made to diagnose celiac disease at every opportunity and raises the issue of whether population screening for celiac disease should be carried out.
  23. The following piece was written by Ronald Hoggan who is a teacher at Queen Elizabeth High School in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. There is much evidence linking untreated celiac disease with malignancy. I have recently been notified of publication of a report I have written on that connection, which is promised for the September, 1997 issue of Medical Hypotheses (1). In that report, I combine a review of the literature with an outline of a possible biochemical pathway whereby psychoactive peptides derived from the pepsin digests of wheat, rye and barley may down-regulate the activation of natural killer cells, the bodys first line of defense against malignancy. This is not a postulation that glutinous grains are carcinogenic. Humankind has been exposed to carcinogens throughout its ~ two million year evolution. But it is only in recent centuries that malignancy has increased exponentially, and has struck so many children and adolescents. This is clearly a counter-evolutionary trend when youngsters are afflicted, because the incidence should be decreasing over time, as these youngsters genes are being pruned from the gene pool. There is some evidence that has come to light since my aforementioned report, which will be of interest to celiacs and members of their families. M. Stanislas Tanchou, a truly visionary physician, and campaigned with Napoleon Bonaparte, presented a paper to the Paris Science Society in 1843, which was a complex statistical examination of malignancy, offering evidence of increased malignancy with increased civilization (2). One of the prime indicators of a civilizing trend was a diet that included cereal grains. The greater the consumption of these foods, the greater the incidence of malignancy (3). Dr. Chris Reading, an orthomolecular psychiatrist, in Australia, has documented the treatment of five cancer patients for depression (4). His testing for food allergies, and subsequent treatment of depression with dietary exclusion of cereal grains resulted in total remission of the cancers (which were also given conventional treatments) in all five patients he reports treating. One of these patients did die, but that was from the cancer treatment. There are also two reports in the Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology (5) Lancet (6) that I cite in my Medical Hypotheses article. These reveal a total remission of malignancy in each patient. One report then recants the original diagnosis, and identifies the correct diagnosis as lymphadenopathy. In the other report, which spurs a heated debate, the original diagnosis is supported by a resected section of malignant bowel, and there can be no doubt as to the correct diagnosis. Further, in a 1977 report, in Nutrition and Cancer (8), from Stanford University, all the children suffering from radiation and chemotherapy damage to the small bowel recovered fully from their chronic enteritis, and suffered no relapse of either the bowel obstruction or the disease. The treatment they were given was a gluten-free, dairy-free, low fat, low residue diet. In an obscure Czech journal, a report has recently indicated that one or more of the gliadins, a sub-set of proteins in gluten, may also interfere with natural killer cell activation in peripheral blood (9). They tested the levels of natural killer cell activation in normal, and in treated celiacs, and found no significant difference. BUT, after 30 minutes exposure of the celiacs blood to gliadin, there was a reduced activation of natural killer cells. For the last hundred years, billions of dollars have been spent identifying carcinogens. Most of what we encounter in our environment appears to have some measure of carcinogenic potential. Unfortunately, we have failed to reconcile that Humanity has been exposed to most of these carcinogens throughout its evolution. Conventional wisdom has pointed to the increasing levels of chemical pollution and environmental damage. And I do not doubt that these factors are contributing to the current epidemic of malignancy. What I do doubt is that segment of the population, variously reported at 20% to 30%, which has the HLA factors which predispose to celiac disease and many other autoimmune diseases, can mount an adequate immune response, with natural killer cells, against malignancy. References: Hoggan R, Considering Wheat, Rye, and Barley Proteins as Aids to Carcinogens in press Medical Hypotheses, 1997. Tanchou S, Statistics of Cancer London Lancet 1843; Aug 5, 593. Audette R, personal communication. Reading C, Meillon R, Your Family Tree Connection, Keats; New Canaan, Conn.: 1988. Wink A, et. al. Disappearance of Mesenteric Lymphadenopathy with Gluten-Free Deit in Celiac Sprue, J. Clin. Gastroenterol, 1993; 16(4): 317-319. Wright DH, et. al. Celiac disease and Lymphoma, Lancet 1991; 337:1373. Wright DH, et. al. letter Lancet 1991; 338: 318-319. Donaldson SS, Effect of Nutrition as Related to Radiation and Chemotherapy, Nutrition and Cancer, Winick ed. 1977; Wiley & Sons, NewYork, 137153. Castany M, Nguyen H, Pospisil M, Fric P, Tlaskalova-Hogenova H, Natural Killer Cell Activity in Celiac Disease: Effect of in Vitro Treatment on Effector Lymphocytes and/or Target Lymphoblastoid, Myeloid and Epithelial Cell Lines with Gliadin, Folia Microbial, 1995 (Praha) 40; 6: 615-620.
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