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Found 10 results

  1. Hello, I don't know if my topic fits better here, but I didn't know where to categorize it. In 2011 I've been diagnosed with celiac disease and since then I've been on a very strict diet, finally starting to feel better in 2014. In the meanwhile, I also had a laparoscopic surgery for 3rd stage endometriosis, and last year I was diagnosed with IBS, lactose intolerance, as well as insulin resistance and systemic candidiasis. Since last month I'm also on therapy for IBD (the doctors are suspecting microscopic colitis, but colonoscopies confirmed atypical inflammation only). Therapy for Candida (Diflucan) didn't help, and I've been recommended to adapt my diet. I was wondering if anyone has experience in dealing with other diets, in particular for Candida? Most of the gluten-free products are starchy, so what do you actually eat? Foods usually recommended for this, like leafy vegetables as well as spices, are impossible for me to eat - actually, I feel sometimes like most of the foods make me feel even worse and I keep losing weight. I hope someone can share their experience, thank you!
  2. Hello, I'm looking for a Gastro Psychiatrist or GI doctor who works with mental illness and would appreciate any recommendations. I've also thought about looking for immunologist who work with the gut microbiome. I live in Nebraska so a doctor in the Midwest would be ideal, but I would appreciate any recomendations! I struggle with anxiety, depression, and multiple food allergies. I've been gluten free about 6 months so I don't think I can be tested for celiac. I've been thinking about doing a gluten challenge to be tested, but out of all my food allergies gluten seems to make anxiety the worst. So, I'm not sure if its worth testing or just keep avoiding. While I've seen improvement in digestive and mental health symptoms since eliminating food allergies, I'm still struggling. I highly suspect I have immune related issues from dysbiosis as I was regularly put on antibiotics for sinus infections growing up. I have a lot of symptoms that point to Candida, histamine intolerance, or SIBO. It would be great to investigate some of these causes under the care of a physician. Any advice is appreciated! <3 Elizabeth
  3. I have had lupus fibromyalgia ibs or spastic colon since 1998. Now i had allergy testing labs on blood. Im allergic to gluten, almonds, oats, barley, cadida yeast, aspiragillys(molds), broccoli, cabbage, clams goats milk, kidney pinto navy and soybeans, pork, sesame, spinach and canola oil. I don't know what to eat now. I've always eaten say at olive garden or anything and had terrible stomach pains like labor. Then run to the bathroom. Or constipation i cant go for a week or so. I tried spark vitamin drink had gluten, soy powder allergic. Health bars larabars gluten. My weight can be 129 one week 120 next or go to 104 fast. Not sure what to do now. How can regain my life back? Could i have celiac not ibs? I have 3 other auto immune system diseases. Any food resources would be great and vitamins with no soy or gluten. Plus beverages. Ive had hives a month now from my almond butter gluten and vitamin drinks lol steroids and epi pen. Oh and high cholesterol. So everything i ate to lower that im allergic to. Plus a list of secondary allergy foods a mile long.
  4. Hello, My name is Bryan and I'm 23 years old. I've never made an account on any website to talk about this, so this is my first because I have a lot to say and I have been avoiding this. I guess I'll start off giving some history of the issues that I have been having. When I was 18 I was getting pretty serious about lifting weights. I started off at about 160 lbs and got to about 180 when I was about 20. Once I hit 20 years old I injured my back pretty bad to where I was in bed for 3 months, and during the time I started to have some GI symptoms around this time. At the time I thought I was literally having heart attacks due to a serious pain in my chest. It would show up sometimes when I ate food, and especially when I drank caffeine (I never really cared for caffeine, but at this time a preworkout Jack3D got me hooked on it). However, I ended up going to Dr. and he ended up telling me I had GERD within 10 minutes, shortly after that he left the room and came back with Nexium (had to be prescribed at the time). I took Nexium for a while and it helped, but once I got off things were worse. I also couldn't take it anymore because I had a SERIOUS pain in the center of my lumbar spine that would only go away if I went #2. So, I tried the holistic path to get rid of this heartburn. Good news is that I beat heartburn, it's been years since I ever even had it. This event was from about 19 to 20 years of age (Just turning 20 it ended). On the flip side, right when I was turning 21 something else slowly started to happen. I first started off with symptoms of being EXTREMELY TIRED 30 minutes eating a lot of the time. When I was 21, I was working at a dollar store and the first time I noticed one of these episodes I was so tired that I couldn't stand up. So, I just sat on the floor. It felt like a tiredness that was almost induced from a drug, it was a different kind of tired. I worked at this dollar store about 2-3 times a week for 3 years, until I was 23. Me and my boss had subway for probably about 90% of our lunches through the course of these 3 years. Subway 2-3 times a week, every week (I eat NO other fast food, just how I was raised). After I noticed this tiredness I started to pay attention to my stool. It was yellow, inconsistent, and I was going anywhere from 2-5 times a day. Once I was aware of being being tired and not being able to go to the bathroom right, I started to get this shoulder tightness that started from under my right scapula at the rib cage. It crept up from my rib under my scapula, to the rhomboid, to my rear deltoid and scapula, and finally to my neck. This shoulder irritation got so bad I considered death thousands of times. Sometimes I was so happy thinking about death that I would literally smile about it, realizing that this would all one day end. Mentally at this point I have developed a serious anxiety. Everyday I woke up as if I had a grenade go off in my head, as if I was drinking ALL night. I would get a full 8 hours without waking up once just to wake up each morning to have a messed up head. Somewhere down the line I started to experience something very strange with my head. Many times before I ate my head would feel "jared". It's like my eyes wanted to roll back into my head and have a seizure, but what would I know, I never had one. Sometimes I thought I would fall on the ground. This would also happen when I would hear something loud or high pitch, a baby screaming, motorcycle going by, or if someone were to throw a beer bottle away in the garbage if it hit another bottle (making the glass hitting each other). I don't drink, smoke, or do any drugs. I have quit caffeine completely out of my life since the beginning of 2016. I forgot to mention, but caffeine and me no longer get along. It is as if I have a complete intolerance to it. I have had -Endoscopy -Colonoscopy -Blood tests for H-Pyl, Celiac, others I can't remember -Taken antibiotics for SIBO -Gallbladder scan -Liver scan -Pancreas is fine If I remember right -I will update more if I remember anything else. This all came up clear. I have had 2 different General Practitioners tell me that I have anxiety. For a long time I put off anxiety medication and have told them I'm not interested. Eventually I caved and got on zoloft, but I started to have bad side effects. Then they put me on Wellbutrin, currently on 300mg a day. Wellbutrin helps, but I feel it's not the answer. I still get tight shoulder issues, bathroom problems, and I forgot to mention that I have a throat clearing issue that's so consistent that it's simply ruining my life. I have tried gluten free 2 different times, both times I've lasted two weeks being 100% gluten-free. My symptoms are still there, but I don't THINK they are as severe. However I caved Sunday 11/6/2016 (ending my two week and two day streak), gluten-free Monday, and caved again yesterday (being Tuesday). Tuesday was the only day I noticed anything, I was super bloated/gassy/tight shoulder/bad head space. I was just unsure how to feel about it seeing as I only had symptoms on Tuesday when I caved and not Sunday. I'm sorry this is long and so jumbled, still have bad head space. Symptoms: Right shoulder tightness, bloating, gas, food cravings for sweets/chocolate (very noticeable while gluten-free), waking up tired, anxiety, symptoms 30 minutes after eating, will add more as I remember and experience them.
  5. Hello, I'm new to the board and definitely have candida issues. My biggest issue is finding a doc who's willing to treat me. I've visited 2 primary care docs who have no idea what I'm talking about, and 2 GI docs who want to perform colonoscopies. What types of docs are you guys seeing that are working with you for treatments of Nystatin/Diflucan? Since those seem to be the main meds that work. I don't know if I should see a PCP, GYN, or Infectious Disease?
  6. Hi, I was dx'd with celiac disease 8 years ago and have been strict gluten free. I need to know what type of gut infections other's have had and how were they treated. I'm having bloating and gas and some stomach pain/discomfort. I have tried SCD diet in the past with great success and seem to do well as long as I stay on it. I cannot drink coffee/eat a lot of sugar or carbs or dairy without heart palpitations. I was treated twice for something (not dx'd) but dr's treated with 2 meds. Diflucon and 1 other I can't remember (it's a nasty one w/ lots of side effects) that cleared it up, but it always creeps back. I'm looking for a doctor in South Jersey who is knowledgeable with Celiac Disease and specifically different gut infections. I'm also looking for information on other types of gut infections and what the problem could be. I now have high blood pressure and feel it's related. Please share if you've had anything similar and especially if there is a good doctor who can help me. I will travel to Philly.
  7. Lancet. 2003 Jun 21;361(9375):2152-4. Celiac.com 08/25/2003 – This interesting study compares a specific amino acid sequence found in Candida cell wall protein to a the gliadin amino acid sequence that triggers the immune response in celiac disease. The researchers found that the sequences are "identical or highly homologous to known coeliac disease-related alpha-gliadin and gamma-gliadin T-cell epitopes," and propose that Candida is the trigger for the onset of celiac disease. Below is the abstract for this study. Is Candida albicans a trigger in the onset of coeliac disease? Nieuwenhuizen WF, Pieters RH, Knippels LM, Jansen MC, Koppelman SJ. Coeliac disease is a T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease of the small intestine that is induced by ingestion of gluten proteins from wheat, barley, or rye. We postulate that Candida albicans is a trigger in the onset of coeliac disease. The virulence factor of C albicans-hyphal wall protein 1 (HWP1)-contains amino acid sequences that are identical or highly homologous to known coeliac disease-related alpha-gliadin and gamma-gliadin T-cell epitopes. HWP1 is a transglutaminase substrate, and is used by C albicans to adhere to the intestinal epithelium. Furthermore, tissue transglutaminase and endomysium components could become covalently linked to the yeast. Subsequently, C albicans might function as an adjuvant that stimulates antibody formation against HWP1 and gluten, and formation of autoreactive antibodies against tissue transglutaminase and endomysium.
  8. Celiac.com 05/31/2006 - Most patients, upon reporting their fear to their doctor that they may have chronic candida infection throughout the intestinal tract, are met with a sneer, a frown, and a chuckle. Most physicians scoff when the large bowel is mentioned as an infected site. However, the Merk Manual, commonly found and held in esteem in any doctors office says that Candida is "Usually transmitted sexually, the infection can also spread from the intestine. The increased incidence is partially due to indiscriminate use of broad-spectrum antibiotics and a large number of women taking contraceptive pills." It also includes corticosteroids (Cortisone) as a possible predisposing factor.(1) Further, a paper printed in "The Journal of the American Medical Association" in 1977 stated: "Vaginal Candidiasis does not occur naturally without infection of C. Albicans within the large bowel and that a cure is not likely as long as the vagina remains the only treatment target."(2) To make matters even more interesting, other inhabitants of the gastrointestinal tract can cause a disruption of the ecology of the large bowel, allowing an overgrowth of C. Albicans. These pathogens also produce gastrointestinal distress and allergic reactions similar to Candida. These microbes or pathogens can lead to an incorrect diagnosis of Candida Albicans, if the doctor is using questionnaires or considering symptoms alone! A partial listing of pathogens would include Aeromas and Plasiomonas, Campylobacter je juni, Citrobacter species, Clostridium difficile, Enterobacter species, Mucoid E. coli and Hemolytic E. Coli, Klebsiella, Pseudomonas and Yersinia Enterocolitica.(3) All can produce similar symptoms to that of a patient with true over-colonization of Candida Albicans. So while the research states Candida can occur both vaginally and in the large bowel, then allowing the broad-spectrum of symptoms we hear about to occur, it also needs to be clarified when another possible microbe is causing the Candida-like symptom. You, the reader, must be careful in allowing yourself and your doctor to begin a Candida regimen before it is documented that you have C. Albicans and not some other pathogen. Any disturbance in your intestinal flora can allow the above mentioned pathogens to begin their dirty work. C. Albicans is not the only opportunist who is waiting for you to use broad spectrum antibiotics. Dont go by symptoms alone! Diagnostic Tools Unfortunately, most tests being used by well-meaning practitioners have drawbacks and require more interpretation than might be currently realized. Stool cultures and rectal mucus swabs have been found of no diagnostic value.(4) That is a rather strong statement bound to offend many people. However, consider these facts. "C. Albicans organisms do not distribute homogeneously throughout the G.I. tract, rather they are found on plaques in the mucosal surfaces and streak scattered throughout the fecal material."(4) In application, this datum means consistent contact with the over-colonization of C. Albicans by fecal matter is not guaranteed due to the nature of growth of C. Albicans. It does not evenly spread itself throughout the bowel. This makes it a matter of chance whether the fecal matter or rectal swab will contact an area which contains C. Albicans. It is true that C. Albicans inhabits the mucosal surface, but in plaques. It is a matter of judgement by the practitioner ! whether the fecal or rectal swab reading is indicative of over-colonization, since everyone does have some Candida Albicans in their bowel. Good practitioners knowing this will want several consecutive negative readings before pronouncing the patient clear of Candida. Also, the amount that qualifies as a true overgrowth in the stool can be a controversy. The true value of a stool culture is in determining the amounts of friendly bacteria relative to unfriendly bacteria, and to discover the presence of harmful bacteria which can weaken the friendly flora, allowing yeast to grow and live. The practitioner who takes into account response to therapy, other biochemical tests which would reveal immune response and mineral absorption in addition to the stool or rectal swab stands a better chance of understanding the patients status. A popular test for detection of antibodies against Candida also has drawbacks. First, a decrease in the antibodies may not mean the patient is doing better, it could mean a decreased immune response. Other biochemical tests are needed to interpret this. An increase in the antibodies may indicate an increase in immune response and not a worsening of the patients health. Many times these antibodies will increase when immune status indicators improve, showing an increase in immune response. So this test also needs to be carefully interpreted. A new test that shows great promise, as it has none of the previously mentioned drawbacks, is the Candisphere Enzyme Immuno Assay. The main difference between this test and other blood studies for C. Albicans is that it is not influenced by the "external" antigens of C. Albicans that are harmless, produced constantly by small "normal" colonies of C. Albicans. Only large numbers of colonies producing a hidden cytoplasmic antigen are reported. This hidden antigen must make its presence known to the bodys immune defenses in order to produce many of the typical symptoms. An overgrowth cannot be missed as with stool or mucus swabs. A blind control treatment study for the FDA revealed a 92% correlation between therapeutic response and test response. The test is now available in the New York City area. I hope this data can be used to clear up some of the confusion both holistic and orthodox practitioners have on this subject. Michael Biamonte holds a Doctorate of Nutripathy, a Degree in Natural Healing, and a Masters in Clinical Nutrition. He is affiliated with the International Academy of Clinical Nutritionists and the International Academy of Nutrition and Preventive Medicine. He is listed in "The Directory of Distinguished Americans" for his research in Nutrition and Physiology. For more info also see: Does Candida Albicans Trigger the Onset of Celiac Disease? References: The Merk Manual, 14th Edition, pages 1625-1626. Miles Mr, Olsen L. Roger A. Recurrent Vaginal Candidiasis, JAMA 238, Pages 1836-1837; 1977. Great Smokies Lab Medical Lab Parasite/Pathogen Primer. Progress in diagnosing. Candida related complex. David Bauman, Ph.D. For an appointment, contact our office at: Michael Biamonte, C.C.N. 139 Fulton St. Suite 507 New York, NY 10038 (212) 587-2330
  9. I have suspected I have celiac disease (or at the very least am gluten-intolerant) for several years. I know very little about this disease and the more I learn the more confused I get. There is still so much more to learn and I feel overwhelmed reading about it. A few years ago, I read Elisabeth Hasslebeck’s book (I think it’s called the gluten-free Diet?) and was pretty convinced I had this disease. I just thought ok well one day I will get tested for it and deal with it then. Honestly, I did not want to have it. I read about all that you CANNOT eat and it sounded awful. So, I just put it out of my mind and thought to myself I probably don’t have it anyway. I have suffered from gastrointestinal problems since I can remember. My main issues are constipation, bloating, horrible abdominal pains, and every now and then nausea. I sometimes feel a sharp pain under my left rib cage. Sometimes the bloating and uncomfortable abdominal pain hurts so bad it hurts to move and I have to unbutton my jeans in order to ease the pain. Sometimes I have painful diarrhea after a particularily fatty meaI. I have tried loading up on fiber and water to help with the constipation. I have tried drinking Miralax. I have eaten prunes, drank prune juice, eaten 25 grams of fiber a day (along with lots of water), drank green smoothies, and just about all that is suggested. Nothing ever helps. I have accepted that this is just how my body is and I will “go when I go”. If I go days without a bowel movement I will take a laxative, which helps, although there have been times it didn’t. I have also used suppositories and enemas (both working most of the time, however, there have been times when no bowel movement was produced). Last year I was having shooting, stabbing pains in my tummy and a friend rushed to the store to get an enema. I layed on the bathroom floor until she came back because it hurt to move. I am currently suffering from tummy issues (as usual) and today I randomly looked celiac up online again. I am once again convinced I have this. I just discovered that iron-deficiency anemia is often linked to celiac disease and that Candida is linked to celiac disease as well. Here is some background info: 1. Had surgery when I was 2 years old due to a hernia. My mom says that from then on I had issues with my bowels. I have read that stress or surgery can trigger or cause celiac disease. 2. Had bad yeast infections since I was a little girl. As an adult I asked the gyno what made me get them so often and she told me that some women are just more prone to them. 3. Diagnosed with IBS when I was 18 years old. 4. Diagnosed with an auto-immune disease when I was 20 years old. (It is a rare disease called henoch-scholein purpura and attacks the kidneys) 5. Diagnosed with hypothyroidism last fall. The doctor told me she wanted to wait and see if my thyroid would get better on its own because once I start the hormone replacement I will have to take it forever. 6. Diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia and started on Ferro-sequels, a potent iron supplement. I was happy to discover I was anemic because I was horribly fatigued and it gave me an explanation as to why. (I was also deficient in vitamin D, but I think this is pretty common?) 7. Auto-immune diseases run in my family (my grandma has Addison’s disease, cousin has thyroid disease, multiple sclerosis, etc) Can anyone relate to this or give me any insight? What is the likelihood that I have celiac disease? I have not lost weight, if anything I cannot lose weight. From what I've read constipation isn't common with celiac, it is usually the opposite (having to go too much). I am going to have blood work done in a few weeks and am thinking about requesting to be tested for celiac disease. My only reservation is the cost of the additional tests (I do not have insurance and am paying out of pocket). Also, from what I have read, false-negatives are common for celiac disease so should I even bother with spending money on the test right now? Should I just go gluten-free and see how I feel? I know that if I should NOT go gluten-free if I do decide to have the test done, as this can affect the accuracy of the results. I will definitely have the test done at some point, just trying to figure out if I should pay out of pocket right now or wait a year until I have insurance. Any suggestions would be extremely appreciated. The more I learn about celiac disease the more questions I have. I know there is so much more for me to learn and I will continue to do research. Thank you! Meagan
  10. I've been gluten free for a little over 2 years now, and while I'm feeling better, I still have some hiccups, but who doesn't? Anyways, I had a pretty bad glutening last week, and in it's wake, I'm trying to figure out how it happened. I haven't come up with anything concrete though; I was eating things which have generally been kind to me, with the exception of oats. I've always been hit and miss with those, and had been on a steady diet of Bob's Red Mill Gluten Free Oats at breakfast for about a month leading up to my big issue. Prior to that I'd been eating Chobani yogurt, berries and corn or rice Chex. I cut the oats off and bounced back almost immediately, but with some odd after effects (VERY minor coetaneous bleeding, tiny little black flecks on the toilet paper). So my epiphany... candida overgrowth. I always just wrote this off, but from what I've been told, the little black flecks and coetaneous bleeding can sometimes signal something bacterial. This also seems to lend a hand to my constant craving for carbs or something sweet. I also seem to have this notion that lots of Tums are some sort of magic bullet when glutened. It also seems to go hand in hand with the absence of some sort of probiotic in my diet. My question to you folks is, has anyone had similar issues? Am I crazy to think this could be my issue? And if I'm not, does anyone have any good tips to flush the candida from me? I'm feeling pretty normal for about 3 days straight, and I've been focussing more on complex carbs, protein, and eating some yogurt...
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