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Found 12 results

  1. I have very slowly come to the conclusion that I have a problem with casein. This is despite being years into the gluten free life and having mostly avoided dairy for a long time. I say mostly because although I would never have had milk in a coffee or with cereal etc. I didn't worry too much if milk was listed in the ingredients of some gluten free processed treat or deny myself the odd milk chocolate if there was one handy. After all my reasoning would go, I deserve it for eschewing all the nice gluten things... I also hadn't given milk too much thought. I think I just thought I was probably lactose intolerant like my father. However although last time I had a fair amount of milk I got the lactose intolerance stomach signs I also got spots on my chest and back a couple of days later. I think, don't know, but think, my issues with dairy may extend to the casein protein rather than just the lactose. Well I've now had enough of my skin issues which I think are strongly linked to milk so I'm now on a new quest to try and remove dairy completely and finding it a little bit of a struggle. I hadn't realised how many of the nice gluten-free foods also contain milk. So I wondered how strict I have to be where casein is concerned. If you have an issue with it and avoid it, do you have to treat it in the same way you would gluten? Is a tiny amount in processed food enough for you to react? Should I get rid of any biscuits etc I have in which have milk listed as an ingredient? Does it matter if the ingredient is butter which I understand to have much lower casein content? What's the deal with casein?
  2. I was tested (last year 2016) for all of my sensitivities. Casein and Gluten obviously were heavy in my results. Before I got tested, I kind of suspected, because my mom tested positive for Celiac Disease. Before I went gluten free / dairy free, I was having a ton of symptoms, ranging from canker sores, trouble breathing, feeling like I was about to choke on every bite of food, feeling like I was about to swallow my tongue, seborrhoeic dermatitis (especially in mustache area), dry skin, numbness in extremities like legs, hands, arms and feet, chills, extreme sickness, losing weight, insomnia, panic attacks, anxiety attacks, diarrhea, constant acid reflux / GERD, hiccups, etc.. I mean I had the whole gamut of issues. But this one issue really is the worst for me and I always wonder if other people with Celiac or Casein intolerance have this too. Whenever I get glutened or ingest casein, I'll be very paranoid and fearful, and it usually begins as I'm waking up from sleep. I'll have what's known as a hypnopompic hallucination and it's typically as I'm coming out of sleep (half asleep / half awake), I'll have a deep epiphany about something and it'll feel like God is judging me or God has shown me something that I don't want to see. I no longer subscribe to any religious faiths, though at one time I was an extreme Christian. But I wake up shaking, with my heart beating fast and feel very terrified for the rest of the day. I'll be obsessing over what I felt like God was showing me in that epiphany, like I'm about to go to hell or something. After going gluten free and dairy free, I no longer have these issues, which proved to me that they weren't a real 'spiritual phenomena.' I have been gluten free for almost a year now and decided to try eating a GLUTEN FREE pizza two days ago. Nothing happened the night I ate the pizza, but this morning (2 days later), I got another hypnopompic hallucination dealing with spiritual things again. So now I know that's the culprit. I was wondering if others here have had anything similar happen? They wake up thinking God is speaking to them or showing them something or they see dead people or any spooky s$#& like that.
  3. Celiac.com 10/20/2016 - Whether you are an adult or a child, you could have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism or even Asperger's Syndrome. If you do not have enough symptom improvements with the traditional treatments, then why not consider an alternative therapy? What about a gluten-free diet? There are so many statistics that show the connection between these mental conditions and celiac disease. Now, in order to help the symptoms, eating a gluten-free and casein-free (Gluten-free Casein-free) diet might actually help. There is evidence of a correlation between ADHD and celiac disease. It is actually fairly strong. Children and adults with undiagnosed celiac disease, seem to have a higher risk than the general population. Once they started a gluten-free diet, the patients or their parents, reported significant improvements in overall behavior and functioning. As for individuals with autism, they might have a food allergy or high sensitivity to foods containing gluten or casein. Eating a Gluten-free Casein-free diet, might help to reduce symptoms and improve speech, social and cognitive behaviors. Children with autism, according to theory, process peptides and proteins in food items that contain casein and gluten differently. The difference within processing, may exacerbate autistic symptoms. Lastly, children with Asperger's Syndrome, can actually have leaky gut syndrome as well. Treating with a gluten free diet could help ease certain symptoms, such as nonsense talk, obsessions, poor coordination, staring off into space and even social difficulties. Then, consider even going one step further and trying an elimination diet. This is an easy method of figuring out what foods your child is truly reacting to. So, as you can see, these three conditions might actually have more improvements with just simple dietary changes. Having less challenges and being able to focus and interact with less difficulty won't be just a dream, but could be a real possibility for your child. References: https://www.verywell.com/depression-behavior-issues-in-celiac-teens-563017 http://www.thesavvyceliac.com/2011/03/12/research-is-food-the-culprit-in-adhd/ http://www.webmd.com/brain/autism/gluten-free-casein-free-diets-for-autism#1 http://www.myaspergerschild.com/2011/11/misbehavior-or-food-allergy.html
  4. I've had a range of symptoms in the last 2 months and in the past few weeks I have discovered that my TTG abs (igA) levels were 41 (my igA tests were fine). The doctor said that he is pretty much certain that it is celiac disease and I am awaiting an endoscopy to confirm it. Before I found out that my TTG abs (igA) levels were high, I noticed that my body was reacting really badly to dairy products. I went on an elimination diet and stopped all gluten and dairy products and felt much better. I carried this on after my results and thought that I must have developed a dairy intolerance due to my celiac. 2 days ago I accidentally consumed a glass of wine which I thought was dairy free but it contained Milk. I have not had any gluten. I am currently in the middle of a flare up. All of a sudden rashes have started to appear on my hands and my anxiety has returned (usually not a anxious person). No diarhhoea, vomiting or digestive issues. I am currently suffering from muscle twitching, rashes predominantly on hands and feet, brain fog, pins and needles/numbness on hands, feet and arms. However, I have been tested for milk allergy and this came back negative. Is it possible that it is dairy that is causing my symptoms/autoimmune reaction and could this be a reason for elevetated TTG abs (igA) levels. Or has the doctor only picked up my celiac and missing something else. If it was dairy intolerance then I would have digestive issues but I don't seem to have any. Could it be the casein protein? Anyone been in a similar situation or can anyone provide some insight?
  5. I wondering if anyone knows if the supplement "Celiact" - celiac with a t on the end - contains trace amounts of milk (casein and/or lactose) in it? I am having trouble finding the answer by going to stores that sell the product. Some reviews by customers reference that it does have trace amounts of milk in it. The supplement works miracles for me but I am casein intolerant. I can handle trace amounts of casein in butter. However, my mother may not, and I don't want her taking this supplement if it has milk bi-products in it.
  6. Sorry for handing out too much information here, but I really don't know who else to ask on this one. I'm recovering from my last glutening, which was about 4 weeks ago. One thing I've noticed late in my recovery cycle is that my stools get really crazy. The first week after being glutened I get the usual "Big D." Then the next week or two they're normal. Then about week 4 or 5 they become really strange. They feel solid when they're inside me, but when I go to the bathroom, they totally fall apart in the toilet. It's not watery, like diahrehea (sp?), but comes out solid then separates into thousands of tiny pieces. Sometimes some mucus will come out too. I also noticed that when I have these kind of BMs, I have the sudden urge to go to the bathroom and I can't control it, like with a normal BM. So, if anyone hasn't gotten totally grossed out by my post yet and is still reading, here are my questions: Does anyone else have this issue? Is this a normal part of my intestines recovering from gluten or do I need to look to another food intolerance as a cause? I've been gluten-free for 2 years. I'm only doing gluten-free at the moment, but probably need to get rid of the dairy too as I have really bad sinus problems. Could casein be a cause? Do you think this is something I should go see the doctor for? I had such a bad experience when I went to the gastro doctor that I hesitate to go again. But if I need to visit a gastro dr., I can do some looking around and find a better one, I guess. Thanks for any help and advice you can give me. And sorry if I grossed anyone out
  7. Hi, I'm new to the forum. I just had a check of my IgA and IgA-Ak done, and my levels are horrible (igA at 94 and IgA-Ak at 187.6). This is after following an extremely strict gluten free diet. I know that sometimes people with celiac disease also react to casein - but would that show up in the blood test, or does that really just test for the presence of gluten? I'm especially curious if that's what's causing this because I was diagnosed with celiacs almost 2 years ago, and I seemed to be improving well. But then about a year ago I reintroduced dairy into my diet, and around that time my antibody levels spiked and I started feeling worse. I'm in Germany, and I'm trying to find a specialist who can help me here, but in the meantime any advice would be welcome. My general practitioner told me she had no idea whether dairy could cause the spike in antibody levels, and that "she thought I'd be happy" because my levels went down from over 200 to 187 over the last six months. She then told me that it was probably impossible to follow a totally gluten free diet, so I should expect high antibodies. Thankfully I know enough not to accept that. Thanks for your insight! Cricket
  8. Does anyone know if it's possible for a casein intolerance to cause elevated levels of antibodies in a celiac patient? I'm interested because I've been on a very strict gluten free diet for several years, but my antibodies are extremely high, and I'm trying to pin down the culprit.
  9. Hi, I'm new here and although I've been wary about eating healthy, in terms of salads, fruits and vegtables for a number of years, I'm 28, I recently decided to go 100% gluten and dairy free (like checking all labels and watching out for cross contamination, because I have had a number of what I thought to be abnormal health issues over the years which never really made that much sense. I'm in good shape and feel fine, relative to how I usually feel, but just still wonder could some of these issues be related to the same source, gluten? My Mom finally went gluten free a couple months ago. She had IBS and GERD for years and it has helped her a lot. She was not overweight but also lost 10 pounds in a month. I've been mostly vegetarian as an adult and am very into not eating processed foods or added sugars, so I'm adding some meat into my new diet, which I can already feel some difference, in terms of being more calm. As a kid my Mom, who didn't know at the time, fed us a lot of bad grain type foods and we always had ice cream and those processed betty crocker baking items around, but all of us seemed to have had pretty good metabolisms, considering what is in that stuff! My dad still eats all those processed foods and has always been extremely skinny, but is generally depressed and irritable. Here are the health issues I've had that I would really appreciate any feedback on the relation to gluten or casein, if know from personal experience: -starting as a teenager felt foggy headed and somewhat depressed. -Had red flushed cheeks and rash on backs of upper arms for a few years in early teens -got first period at age 14 (which I always thought was a little old) -didn't have period for almost year ages 15-16 -had pnemonia -very low resting heartrate at age 16, normal weight, doctors told me i must have an eating disorder, a heart condition, or brain tumor, eventually blood test showed very high TSH and I was diagnosed hypo-thyroid from hasimotos. -diagnosed with adhd in college, but have had the symptoms for as long as my parents can remember. - have had anemia or low iron and also a lot of coldness at the extremities since being a teenager. -have had periods of time where i am really into oatmeal (plain), nothing added, i think this is because of cross contamination with gluten. Thanks so much for reading
  10. Hi everyone, I've been strictly gluten free for about 1 year. I do not have diagnosed celiac disease but I know I was very sick before I cut it out. When I went gluten free I noticed I felt much better but about 3 months in noticed a soy intolerance. Then came lactose then casein and most recently chicken, potato, Certified gluten-free oats, quinoa and corn. Corn has been the bane of my existence. I can not tolerate even distilled white vinegar (derived from corn). That said, I feel so much better. Normal and healthy most of the time. I am shocked and amazed by how healthy and happy I feel after having years of debilitating migraines, IBS, and neuropathy. These foods gone, I feel great! So, I am by no means complaining but seriously....did anyone ever get their foods back? Obviously gluten is NEVER reintroduced. But I do miss potato. I miss soy (tamari please!). I realllllly miss cheese! I know one year is not that long for healing but I have to ask, have you been able to reintroduce your intolerances? How long did it take for you? Also, for those of you with other grain intolerances, ever reintroduce those? I am really curious as to other grain intolerances like corn. Would be nice not to worry about salt (iodized table salt has corn as a binding agent). Thanks everyone!
  11. The following is a post from Ron Hoggan - Q: I asked the doctor what an inflamed mucosa could mean and he shrugged and then added parasites, maybe? She was tested for parasites way back before her first biopsy (October 96). A: Have you tried eliminating dairy? Volta et. al. have demonstrated that 36% to 48% of celiacs tested were also intolerant to milk protein. Borner et. al. have demonstrated sequence homology, from the N-terminal, between casein and gliadin. The other three cited below are also identifying milk protein intolerances associated with celiac disease. Playing the odds, exclusion of dairy is most likely to help. But there are other significant dietary allergens that might be eliminated if a dairy free diet, in addition to the Gluten-free diet, doesnt help. Borner H, Isolation of antigens recognized by coeliac disease auto-antibodies and their use in enzyme immunoassay of endomysium and reticulin antibody-positive human sera. Clin Exp Immunol 106(2), 344-350 (1996) Hvatum M, Serum IgG subclass antibodies to a variety of food antigens in patients with coeliac disease. Gut 33(5), 632-638 (1992) Ciclitira PJ, Gliadin antibody production by small intestinal lymphocytes from patients with coeliac disease.Int Arch Allergy Appl Immunol 89(2-3), 246-249 (1989) Volta U, Antibodies to dietary antigens in coeliac disease. Scand J Gastroenterol 21(8), 935-940 (1986) Ciclitira PJ, Secretion of gliadin antibody by coeliac jejunal mucosal biopsies cultured in vitro. Clin Exp Immunol 64(1), 119-124 (1986)
  12. Proteins consist of long chains of units known as amino acids. Normal proteins are digested by enzymes in the intestines and are broken down into these units. However, if for some reason this digestion is incomplete, short chains of these amino acids (known as peptides) will result. ....... The majority of these peptides will be dumped in the urine, (but) a small portion will cross into the brain and interfere with transmission in such a way that normal (brain) activity is altered or disrupted..... (snip. The articles goes on to explain that these peptides are biologically active & somewhat similar to opioid peptides.) It is well known that casein (from human or cows milk) will break down in the stomach to produce a peptide known as casomorphine, which, as the name implies, will have opioid activities. Similar effects are noted with gluten from wheat and some other cereals ...in which the compounds formed are gluteomorphins (or gliadinomorphins). So some of us who are gluten sensitive are also casein sensitive, and a gluten ingestion will affect brain activity.