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Found 2 results

  1. Celiac.com 06/25/2018 - The latest studies show that celiac disease now affects 1.2% of the population. That’s millions, even tens of millions of people with celiac disease worldwide. The vast majority of these people remain undiagnosed. Many of these people have no clear symptoms. Moreover, even when they do have symptoms, very often those symptoms are atypical, vague, and hard to pin on celiac disease. Here are three ways that you can help your healthcare professionals spot celiac disease, and help to keep celiacs gluten-free: 1) Your regular doctor can help spot celiac disease, even if the symptoms are vague and atypical. Does your doctor know that anemia is one of the most common features of celiac disease? How about neuropathy, another common feature in celiac disease? Do they know that most people diagnosed with celiac disease these days have either no symptoms, or present atypical symptoms that can make diagnosis that much harder? Do they know that a simple blood test or two can provide strong evidence for celiac disease? People who are newly diagnosed with celiac disease are often deficient in calcium, fiber, folate, iron, magnesium, niacin, riboflavin, vitamin B12, vitamin D, and zinc. Deficiencies in copper and vitamin B6 are less common, but still possible. Also, celiac disease is a strong suspect in many patients with unexplained nutritional anemia. Being aware of these vague, confusing symptoms of celiac disease can help people get bette advice, and hopefully speed up a diagnosis. 2) Your dentist can help spot celiac disease Does your dentist realize that dental enamel defects could point to celiac disease? Studies show that dental enamel defects can be a strong indicator of adult celiac disease, even in the absence of physical symptoms. By pointing out dental enamel defects that indicate celiac disease, dentists can play an important role in diagnosing celiac disease. 3) Your pharmacist can help keep you gluten-free Does your pharmacist know which medicines and drugs are gluten-free, and which might contain traces of gluten? Pharmacists can be powerful advocates for patients with celiac disease. They can check ingredients on prescription medications, educate patients to help them make safer choices, and even speak with drug manufacturers on patients’ behalf. Pharmacists can also help with information on the ingredients used to manufacture various vitamins and supplements that might contain wheat. Understanding the many vague, confusing symptoms of celiac disease, and the ways in which various types of health professionals can help, is a powerful tool for helping to diagnose celiac disease, and for managing it in the future. If you are suffering from one or more of these symptoms, and suspect celiac disease, be sure to gather as much information as you can, and to check in with your health professionals as quickly as possible.
  2. Celiac.com 05/17/2018 - Celiac disease is not one of the most deadly diseases out there, but it can put you through a lot of misery. Also known as coeliac, celiac disease is an inherited immune disorder. What happens is that your body’s immune system overreacts to gluten and damages the small intestine. People who suffer from the disease cannot digest gluten, a protein found in grain such as rye, barley, and wheat. While it may not sound like a severe complication at first, coeliac can be unpleasant to deal with. What’s worse is it would lower your body’s capacity to absorb minerals and vitamins. Naturally, the condition would cause nutritional deficiencies. The key problem that diagnosing celiac is difficult and takes take longer than usual. Surprisingly, the condition has over 200 identified symptoms. More than three million people suffer from the coeliac disease in the United States alone. Even though diagnosis is complicated, there are symptoms that can help you identify the condition during the early stages to minimize the damage. Here is how you can recognize the main symptoms of celiac disease: Diarrhea In various studies conducted over years, the most prominent symptom of celiac disease is chronic diarrhea. People suffering from the condition would experience loose watery stools that can last for up to four weeks after they stop taking gluten. Diarrhea can also be a symptom of food poisoning and other conditions, which is why it makes it difficult to diagnose coeliac. In certain cases, celiac disease can take up to four years to establish a sound diagnosis. Vomiting Another prominent symptom is vomiting. When accompanied by diarrhea, vomiting can be a painful experience that would leave you exhausted. It also results in malnutrition and the patient experiences weight loss (not in a good way though). If you experience uncontrolled vomiting, report the matter to a physician to manage the condition. Bloating Since coeliac disease damages the small intestine, bloating is another common system. This is due to inflammation of the digestive tract. In a study with more than a 1,000 participants, almost 73% of the people reported bloating after ingesting gluten. Bloating can be managed by eliminating gluten from the diet which is why a gluten-free diet is necessary for people suffering from celiac disease. Fatigue Constant feeling of tiredness and low energy levels is another common symptom associated with celiac disease. If you experience a lack of energy after in taking gluten, then you need to consult a physician to diagnose the condition. Now fatigue can also result from inefficient thyroid function, infections, and depression (a symptom of the coeliac disease). However, almost 51% of celiac patients suffer from fatigue in a study. Itchy Rash Now the chances of getting a rash after eating gluten are slim, but the symptom has been associated with celiac disease in the past. The condition can cause dermatitis herpetiformis, which causes a blistering skin rash that occurs around the buttocks, knees, and elbows. A study found out that almost 17% of patients suffering from celiac disease might develop dermatitis herpetiformis due to lack of right treatment. Make sure you schedule an online appointment with your dermatologist or visit the nearest healthcare facility to prevent worsening of symptoms. Even with such common symptoms, diagnosing the condition is imperative for a quick recovery and to mitigate the long-term risks associated with celiac disease. Sources: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov Celiac.com ncbi.nlm.nih.gov mendfamily.com
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