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Found 9 results

  1. Celiac.com 03/02/2015 - Officials at UCLA Ronald Reagan Medical Center have warned 179 people that a fairly routine endoscopy procedure may have left them exposed to a drug-resistant 'super-bug' that infected seven patients, and may have contributed to two deaths. The possible exposures occurred at the UCLA Ronald Reagan Medical Center, between October and January, in patients who underwent a procedure in which a specialized endoscope is inserted down the throat to diagnose and treat pancreatic and bile duct diseases. Officials said in an official statement that hospital staff had been sterilizing the scopes according to the manufacturer's standards, but was now using "a decontamination process that goes above and beyond manufacturer and national standards." Meanwhile, hospitals across the United States have reported exposures from the same type of medical equipment in recent years, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has said it was working with other government agencies and manufacturers of the scopes to minimize risks to patients. The FDA says recent medical publications and adverse event reports associated multidrug-resistant bacterial infections in patients who have undergone ERCP with reprocessed duodenoscopes, "even when manufacturer reprocessing instructions are followed correctly." The multidrug-resistant bacterial infections include carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) such as Klebsiella species and Escherichia coli. The FDA says that from January 2013 through December 2014, they received 75 medical device reports involving about 135 patients related to possible microbial transmission from reprocessed duodenoscopes. "It is possible that not all cases have been reported to the FDA," the agency says. Given the fact that celiac disease diagnosis and follow up care require the use of endoscopy, this news is particularly disturbing to those in the celiac community. Source: Medscape.com.
  2. Celiac.com 06/21/2013 - Caroline, a third-grader at St. Pius school in Chicago her mother, Cassandra, both have celiac disease. After being formally diagnosed at the Celiac Disease Center at the University of Chicago, they each received care package that contained "…lots of gluten free foods, as well as tons of literature about eating gluten free,” said Cassandra. “Caroline’s care package had a stuffed animal in it," she added. The university's care package program is funded solely by donations, and this knowledge, along with Caroline's appreciation, led to a desire to support the Celiac Disease Center. Cassandra credits Caroline with a plan to make and sell pony tail holders with ribbons. Caroline made the holders herself, and sold them for $4.00 each, collecting over one hundred dollars in the process. Caroline specifically "wanted the money to be used to send another little girl or boy a care package and stuffed animal,” said Cassandra. Caroline proudly announced her efforts and presented the money at her at her annual appointment with Dr. Stefano Guandalini, founder of the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center. Dr. Guandalini was "so appreciative and proud of her efforts,” beamed Cassandra. “His kind words to her made our day, and Caroline left feeling great about giving back!” Principal Daniel Flaherty called Caroline a "…great example for all of us here at St. Pius X Parish School.” Source: http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/suburbs/lombard_villa_park/community/chi-ugc-article-st-pius-x-third-grader-inspired-to-give-2013-04-26,0,5389721.story
  3. The following report comes to us from The Sprue-Nik Press, which is published by the Tri-County Celiac Sprue Support Group, a chapter of CSA/USA, Inc. serving southeastern Michigan (Volume 7, Number 6, September 1998). The degree of mucosal damage varies from one celiac patient to another. Also, the amount of the small intestine that is affected also varies, with the damage usually progressing from the beginning of the small intestine and then moving downward toward the end of the small intestine. This may explain the variable symptoms in different patients. For example, when a significant portion of the small intestine is involved, diarrhea, malabsorption, and weight loss result. When damage is isolated to only the top portion of the small intestine, the only affect may be iron deficiency. (Incidentally, when iron deficiency is not corrected by iron supplements, it is highly likely that celiac disease is the cause of the deficiency.) Gluten in a celiacs diet causes the immune system to produce gliadin antibodies in the intestine. Some of these leak into the bloodstream where they can be detected in blood tests. These blood tests are useful for screening for celiac disease, though a small intestinal biopsy remains the gold standard for diagnosing celiac disease (celiac disease). There are few diseases for which diet and nutritional issues are more important than for celiac disease. At this time, the only known treatment of celiac disease is the removal of wheat, barley, rye, and oats from the celiacs diet. On the surface this sounds simple, but complete removal of dietary gluten can be very difficult. Gluten-containing grains are ubiquitous in the Western diet. Also, grain-derived food additives such as partially hydrolyzed vegetable protein [and modified food starch] are widely used in processed foods and oral medications. Content labels are often vague or incomplete regarding these additives. What further complicates matters is a lack of significant experience on the part of physicians and dietitians in the dietary treatment of celiac disease. This is mainly because there are so few celiac patients for anyone practitioner. Therefore the best sources of dietary information for a new patient are other knowledgeable, more experienced celiacs. It is very important that the diet be followed with full and strict compliance. Celiacs, especially if theyve had active celiac disease for a longtime, are at higher than normal risk for GI malignancies.(Fortunately, compliance to a good gluten-free diet returns the risk of malignancy and life expectancy to that of the general population.)Another complication of long-term untreated celiac disease is bone loss, which maybe irreversible in older patients. When a large portion of the small intestine is affected by active celiac disease, the result can be a generalized malabsorption problem, resulting in deficiencies of water- and fat-soluble vitamins and minerals. Folic acid deficiency is particularly common in celiac disease because, like iron, it is absorbed in the upper small intestine [where the highest concentration of celiac-related damage generally occurs]. Folic acid is necessary for DNA replication, which occurs in cell turnover. So a deficiency of folic acid can impair the regenerative ability of the small intestine. Vitamin B12, also essential to DNA synthesis, is not malabsorbed as commonly as folic acid. Magnesium and calcium deficiency are also common in active celiac disease, because of decreased intestinal absorption AND because these minerals tend to bind with malabsorbed fat which passes through the system. It is particularly important for doctors to assess the magnesium status of celiacs, because without correction of a magnesium deficiency, low levels of calcium and potassium in the blood cannot usually be corrected with supplements. In severe cases, magnesium supplementation should be done intravenously because of the tendency of oral magnesium to cause diarrhea. Supplemental calcium generally should be provided to celiacs, possibly with vitamin D, to help restore tissue and bone calcium levels to normal. The exact dose of calcium is not known. Dr. Fine usually recommends 1500-2000 mg of elemental calcium per day, divided into two doses, for several years and sometimes indefinitely. [4], [5], [6] Zinc is another mineral that often becomes depleted in patients with chronic malabsorption. Zinc supplementation (usually the RDA via multi-vitamin and mineral supplements) helps avoid skin rashes and restores normal taste. Up to 20% of celiacs will continue to experience loose or watery stools even after going on a gluten-free diet. Sometimes this is due to inadvertent gluten in the diet, but a recent study at Dr. Fines medical center showed that in these cases other diseases epidemiologically associated with celiac disease are present.[7] These include microscopic colitis, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, lactose intolerance, selective IgA deficiency, hypo- or hyperthyroidism, and Type I diabetes mellitus. When diarrhea continues after beginning a gluten-free diet, a search for these associated diseases or others should be undertaken and treated if found. The use of cortico steroids has been advocated in celiacs when the response to the gluten-free diet is sluggish or absent. This is necessary more often in older than in younger patients. However, pancreatic enzyme supplements (prescribed by a doctor) may be needed to help digestion and resolve ongoing malabsorption in some patients. The endomysial antibody blood test is highly accurate and specific for detecting celiac disease. However, the current method of detecting these antibodies involves an operator looking through a microscope and observing the antibody binding on monkey esophagus or human umbilical cord tissue substrates. The correct interpretation of results is highly dependent on the skill and experience of the technician interpreting the fluorescence pattern through the microscope. Moreover, determination of the amount of antibody present relies upon repeat examinations following dilutions of the blood serum, with the last positive test being reported as a titer. A new discovery was reported by a research group in Germany.[8] The antigen substrate of the endomysial antibodies has been identified. This allows the development of a new test that can detect and measure serum endomysial antibodies in one, chemically-based test run [thus greatly reducing the potential for human error and significantly reducing the time needed for each test--ed.] These new tests should be available for clinical use shortly. In a recent study, Dr. Fine found that the frequency of positive stool blood tests was greater in patients with total villous atrophy relative to partial villous atrophy, and all tests were negative in treated patients without villous atrophy.[9] This suggests that fecal occult blood may be a non-invasive and inexpensive method of following the response of the damaged intestine to treatment. Also, it should be noted that the high frequency of positive tests due to villous atrophy will decrease the accuracy of the tests when used for cancer screening in this same patient population (which is how these tests are normally used by health care providers). There have been two recent reports touting the lack of deleterious effects when 50 grams of oats per day are added to the diet of celiac patients. Although this finding is exciting for celiacs, both studies possess certain limitations. In the first study, published by a Finnish group, the exclusion criteria for symptoms and histopathology were somewhat strict, so that patients with more mild forms of celiac disease seemingly were selected for study. And though no damage to duodenal histology occurred after one year of oats consumption, no physiologic or immunologic parameters of disease activity were measured. Furthermore, several patients in the treatment group dropped out of the study for reasons not mentioned in the article.[10] The second and more recent study involved only 10 patients, studied for twelve weeks. The favorable results of this study must be interpreted with caution because of the small sample size and short study period.[11] Even the one-year treatment period in the Finnish study may be too short to observe a harmful effect, as it is known that small intestinal damage sometimes will not occur for several years following there introduction of gluten to a treated celiac. At the worst, an increase in the incidence of malignancy may result from chronic ingestion of oats, an effect that could take decades to manifest. Therefore, this issue will require further study before oats can be recommended for the celiac diet. 3. From the September 1998 newsletter of the Houston Celiac-Sprue Support Group, a chapter of CSA/USA, Inc. 4. Ciacci C, Maurelli L, et el, Effects of dietary treatment on bone mineral density in adults with celiac disease; factors predicting response, Am J Gastroenterol, 1997; 92 (6): 992-996. 5. Mautalen C, Gonzalez D, et al, Effect of treatment on bone mass, mineral metabolism, and body composition in untreated celiac patients, Am J Gastroenterol, 1997; 2 (2):313-318. 6. Corazza gluten-free, Di Sario A, et al, Influence of pattern of clinical presentation and of gluten-free diet on bone mass and metabolism in adult coeliac disease, Bone, 1996; 18 (6):525-530. 7. Fine, KD, Meyer RL, Lee EL, The prevalence and causes of chronic diarrhea in patients with celiac sprue treated with a gluten-free diet, Gastroenterol, 1997; 112 (6):1830-1838. 8. Dieterich W, Ehnis T, et al, Identification of tissue transglutaminase as the autoantigen of celiac disease, Nat Med, 1997; 3 (7):797-801. 9. Fine KD, The prevalence of occult gastrointestinal bleeding in celiac sprue, N Engl J Med, 1996; 334 (18):1163-1167. 10. Janatuinen EK, Pikkarainen PH, et al, A comparison of diets with and without oats in adults with celiac disease, N Engl J Med, 1995; 333 (16):1033-1037. 11. Srinivasan U, Leonard N, et al, Absence of oats toxicity in adult coeliac disease, BMJ, 1996; 313 (7068):1300-1301.
  4. For the first time, researchers at the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center will use mouse model research to explore root causes of celiac disease, test new therapies, and explore new targets for treatment. Celiac disease is the most common genetic autoimmune disease in the world. Celiac disease affects approximately three million Americans, but only three out of every one hundred people with celiac disease have been diagnosed. At least ninety-seven percent of people with celiac disease undiagnosed. Untreated celiac disease can lead to osteoporosis, infertility, neurological conditions, and cancer. Moreover, people with celiac disease have a substantially higher risk of developing other autoimmune diseases, especially Type-1 diabetes. Bana Jabri, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor, University of Chicago Medical Center, and a leading celiac disease researcher, will create the new mouse model with the goal of identifying new remedies and preventive treatments targeted at children of families with a history of celiac disease. The studies will also investigate events that contribute to the development of Type-1 diabetes. “There is a critical need to provide the proper resources to those who suffer from celiac disease,” said Stefano Guandalini, M.D., professor of pediatrics at the University of Chicago Medical Center, founder and medical director of the Celiac Disease Center. “This commitment from University of Chicago Celiac Advisory Board reaffirms the Celiac Disease Center’s mission to bring cutting edge research, education and encouragement to those affected by the disease”. Dr. Jabri believes that mouse models are central to understanding the underlying causes of celiac disease, its connection to other autoimmune diseases. The University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center is a 501-c3 non-profit organization, completely funded by donor contributions, and committed to improving the care, diagnosis and awareness of celiac disease. The University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center also provides necessary infrastructure and support for cutting-edge celiac research, including investigations into structure of gluten peptides and the mechanisms by which gluten modifies self molecules. Mouse model studies show promise in helping researchers to better and more quickly unlock the secrets of celiac disease. For more information please visit: www.celiacdisease.net
  5. Celiac.com 09/28/2006 - The Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia announces the establishment of the Center for Celiac Disease, a multidisciplinary resource created to diagnose, treat and provide support for patients and families with celiac disease. "A person with celiac disease is unable to digest gluten, a common ingredient found in many foods, including bread, pasta and even condiments," said Ritu Verma, M.D., gastroenterologist and director of the Center for Celiac Disease at Childrens Hospital. "This inability to digest gluten damages the lining of the small intestine and prevents the body from absorbing essential nutrients. The only treatment for celiac disease is a strict gluten-free diet." One of the challenges of celiac disease is that though it is relatively common, affecting approximately one in 133 people, the warning signs like small stature, fatigue and stomach irritation are relatively vague and may mimic other disorders like inflammatory bowel disease or lactose intolerance, making it difficult to diagnose. In some cases symptoms may be so mild that they are overlooked entirely. If celiac disease is not diagnosed, patients may face problems with osteoporosis, internal organ disorders and internal bleeding. "The average patient lives with celiac disease for 11 years before being properly diagnosed," said Dr. Verma. "The goal of the Center for Celiac Disease at Childrens Hospital is for families to get the answers they need and receive a comprehensive treatment plan and support that will last a lifetime." The Center for Celiac Disease consists of a multidisciplinary team of specialists including physicians, nutritionists, nurses, educators, laboratory technicians and clinical researchers, who provide individualized nutrition counseling and care for each patient. "Celiac disease not only affects the child diagnosed with the disease, but also the entire family because treatment requires a drastic change in lifestyle and diet," said Jennifer Autodore, R.D, LDN, clinical nutritionist at Childrens Hospital. "That is why at Childrens Hospitals Center for Celiac Disease we offer care from highly-trained specialists, in addition to family education sessions and support groups where information about the latest gluten-free restaurants and recipes is shared. The Center also provides comprehensive family screenings and support and direction to advocate for gluten-free menu items in the childrens schools." The Center for Celiac Disease at The Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia is one of the largest resources in the Northeast United States, dedicated solely to the care of children with celiac disease. The Center currently treats more than 350 patients from Pennsylvania, Delaware, and New Jersey. For more information on the Center for Celiac Disease please visit http://www.chop.edu or call 215-590-1680 to make an appointment. The Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia was founded in 1855 as the nations first pediatric hospital. Through its long-standing commitment to providing exceptional patient care, training new generations of pediatric healthcare professionals and pioneering major research initiatives, Childrens Hospital has fostered many discoveries that have benefited children worldwide. Its pediatric research program is among the largest in the country, ranking second in National Institutes of Health funding. In addition, its unique family-centered care and public service programs have brought the 430-bed hospital recognition as a leading advocate for children and adolescents.
  6. Celiac.com 12/06/2005 - Alek Komarnitsky from Lafayette, CO (USA) has had thousands of Christmas lights on his house for the enjoyment of friends and neighbors since 2000. In 2002, he added a webcam and webcontrol, so people on the Internet could not only view his lights, but turn them on & off and see the results on their computer screen via the Christmas webcam. It got increasingly popular each year, and in 2004, a media frenzy erupted over it and the story went around the world on the Internet, in print, on radio, and on TV - one of the more entertaining segments was when Denver ABC-7 took him up in their helicopter for a live report on the 6:00 News of the blinking lights. There was only one problem - it was all a fun little Christmas hoax. The lights were real, but a sequence of still images were used to provide the illusion that people were changing them. Aleks wife was changing the lights when the chopper was overhead, but the rest of the time they never changed! Concerned that his prank had gotten out of hand, Alek approached the Wall Street Journal to fess up and High Tech Holiday Light Display Draws Everyone But the Skeptics revealed the hoax after Christmas. Needless to say, the media howled over this change of events, and another round of international publicity ensued as people around the world got a good post-holiday chuckle. For 2005, Alek suggests a headline of High Tech Holiday Display Says Bring on the Skeptics! With improved technology available, he has three (real) ChristmasCams (three more than last year!) providing real-time views of his 26,000 Christmas Lights. And using X10 power line control technology, people on the Internet really can them on and off this year. He adds Ill be sure to have it operational on Christmas Eve so web surfers can look for Santa, but realistically, I doubt well get a picture of Rudolph landing on my roof .... but HEY, you never know! Aleks children - Dirk and Kyle While www.komar.org has always been free to Internet surfers around the world, Alek encourages those people who enjoy the Christmas lights show to consider making a direct contribution to the CFCR. Aleks two sons have celiac disease, so this cause is important to him. Individuals and companies that donate are listed on the high traffic web site for Christmas lights fans around the world to see. And in keeping with Aleks whimsical nature, he has donated the Christmas Lights Webcam that Fooled the World to the CFCR. There actually was a webcam last year, since as the media showed up at his house in droves, he figured he should put something up in the tree across the street to make it look like there was one. So he a cobbled together a contraption of a Christmas slide projector ($10), a half a roll of duct tape ($2), and ended up fooling the world - PRICELESS! The CFCR plans to have an eBay auction in December of this well constructed piece of history - again, 100% of proceeds for Celiac Research. So for those that missed out on the $28,000 Virgin Mary French Toast, get ready for the eBay auction of the The Christmas Lights Webcam that Fooled the World. Make a donation at the University of Marylands Center for Celiac Disease Research And be sure to say For Christmas Lights when make your donation.
  7. University of Maryland Center for Celiac Research is an institution engaged in clinical care, diagnostic support, education, and clinical and basic science research in Celiac Disease. The paramount goal of the Center for Celiac Research is to increase the awareness of celiac disease in order to provide better care, better quality of life, and more adequate support for the celiac disease community. In order to achieve these goals the Center for Celiac Research has the following primary missions: 1) To support cutting-edge, innovative, interactive, multidisciplinary research in all aspects of celiac disease including (1) epidemiology research to establish the prevalence of the disease worldwide; (2) basic research (pathophysiology, autoimmune mechanisms, inflammatory processes, genetics); (2) clinical research (clinical spectrum of celiac disease, association with other autoimmune diseases, complications including infertility, osteoporosis and malignant transformation); (3) challenges of treatment of the disease (psychological impact of the diagnosis on family dynamics and on the acceptance of the gluten-free diet, toxicity of traces of gluten in both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients); 2) Increase the awareness of the disease among (1) health care professionals including primary and subspecialty physicians, nurses, nutritionists and dietitians; (2) public and private health care providers; (3) food regulatory agencies; (4) legislators; (5) general population; 3) To provide state-of-the-art education opportunities for medical students, graduate students, post-doctoral fellows and visiting scientists in one or more of the broad areas outlined as mission 1; to offer educational exchange opportunities to international students, clinicians and scientists particularly from the developing countries; 4) To provide consultation in the area of basic and clinical aspects of celiac disease, advise on the most appropriate algorithm for diagnosis and treatment of the disease; 5) To implement the diagnostic tools for celiac disease including newly developed diagnostic strategies and international implementation of the standardization of these tools; 6) To provide expert consultantship or committee membership to both national and international agencies as well as industry engaged in activities in celiac disease. Organization Plan of the CFCR To achieve the mission and goals outlined in the previous section, it is pivotal that the Center has a multidisciplinary approach to research and education in celiac disease. Based on the recent scientific advances in this field, it became apparent that several expertises should interface under a common structure. Specifically the key components of the CFCR include: (1) a diagnostic laboratory in which well standardized test for the diagnosis of celiac disease are used and implemented; (2) a strong clinical expertise for the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease; (3) sophisticated immunology components to study the autoimmune process involved in the pathogenesis of the disease; (4) a strong basic science laboratory with expertise in molecular biology, intestinal pathophysiology, human genetics, and gut immunology; (5) food technology to implement the guidelines for safe gluten- free products, to improve the quality and the economical impact of the diet for celiac patients (5) a nutrition core facility that can provide the most updated information on diet guidelines; (6) a psychological core component knowledgeable of the emotional impact of the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. University of MarylandCenter for Celiac Research 22 S. Greene Street, Box 140 Baltimore, MD 21201 pking@peds.umaryland.edu http://www.celiaccenter.org/
  8. The University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center (UCCDC) was established to develop and coordinate patient services, research activities, medical education and public awareness initiatives in order to increase the rate of celiac diagnoses and improve the lives of patients in the Midwest. Our efforts are focused on the Chicago area, but every UCCDC program is created with the intention of making it portable so that other medical centers can implement similar programs with proven results. Created by Stefano Guandalini, M.D., an international expert on celiac disease, and Robin Steans, mother of a child with celiac disease, the UCCDC is a unique partnership between a dynamic external advisory board and a premier academic medical center. This endeavor is enhanced through a close working relationship with the Celiac Sprue Association of Greater Chicago and the Friends of Celiac Disease Research in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Since February, 2001, the UCCDC has launched activities in four program areas: Patient Services: Helping people who are at-risk for celiac disease to learn how they can be tested, and providing information and support to newly diagnosed patients and their families. Professional Education: Expanding the knowledge base of physicians and dietitians who come in contact with at-risk patients so that they can identify people in need of testing and provide appropriate nutritional counseling to newly diagnosed patients. Research: Contributing to the body of scientific knowledge on celiac disease, focusing especially on key unanswered questions regarding the prevalence of celiac disease in the U.S. and in special at-risk populations. Advocacy and Awareness: Heighten the awareness of the general public, most importantly on the symptoms of celiac disease so that persons found to be at risk may be tested, and advocate for better food labeling, increased research funding and improved public accommodation for people with celiac disease and their families. Our Accomplishments: Developed a patient care package program that provides concrete tools like a listing of gluten-free foods, a grocery store guide, newsletters, and memberships to local and national celiac organizations, as well as donations of gluten-free foods for children newly diagnosed with celiac disease and their families. Parents who have received the care packages have said that they feel less overwhelmed about learning the gluten-free diet, and less afraid about what to feed their children. Families receive the care package at the time of diagnosis. Designed a clinical protocol to educate primary care physicians about celiac disease through an educational intervention and a year-long study that helps to identify current patients at risk for celiac disease in their practices. The protocol is being finalized and the program will begin to recruit participants shortly. Planned and implemented an educational event for parents, featuring noted author Danna Korn, speaking on celiac disease and the challenges of raising a child with the condition. During the parents presentation, children were kept busy nearby at a gluten-free carnival. Over 175 people were in attendance, and participants expressed great relief in finding other parents to talk with who were experiencing their same anxieties and fears. Featured in a Sunday Chicago Tribune health article on celiac disease, where the UCCDCs telephone number was listed as a resource for readers. Over 125 calls were generated, which led to 6 people getting tested (that we can confirm) and at least one woman, to date, receiving a diagnosis of celiac disease as a result of the article. Created a dedicated celiac disease clinic at the University of Chicago Childrens Hospital, staffed with professionals who are dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease. We are so grateful for the support weve received from organizations, companies and individuals serving the celiac community and look forward to keeping you updated on our progress and upcoming activities. The University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center at The University of Chicago Childrens Hospital 5839 S. Maryland Avenue, MC 4065 Chicago, Illinois 60637 Tel: (773) 702-7593 Fax: (773) 702-0666 Internet: www.cureceliacdisease.org
  9. Columbia Genome Center at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY: The Center is looking for families who have more than one member affected with Celiac Disease, to participate in a genetic research study. Information about the study is included below. All inquiries should be made to the Genetic Coordinator, Michele Pallai, at (203) 438-3582 or email: pallai@ibm.net. The Columbia Genome Center is sponsoring a research program at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons to identify the gene responsible for Celiac Disease. Professor of Genetics and Development, T. Conrad Gilliam, renowned for mapping the genes responsible for Wilson disease and spinal muscular atrophy, is leading the investigation. In addition to his own research staff, Professor Gilliam has access to all of the resources of the Columbia Genome Center for ancillary support of this project. Role of Families with Celiac Disease: The key to this type of study is the participation of families in which there are at least two family members affected with Celiac Disease. Participation of unaffected, as well as affected members may be needed. Those individuals who consent to participate will be asked to provide a sample of blood (20cc) for DNA analysis and give permission for release of their diagnostic records for review by Dr. Peter Green, Clinical Professor of Medicine. Blood collection can be done through a physicians office or a blood drawing laboratory. Participants will be provided with a blood drawing kit. The project will cover the costs of drawing the sample and its shipment. Guidance will be provided by the Genetic Coordinator, Michele Pallai. Who can participate in the study? Anyone representing a family with two family members affected with Celiac Disease can participate. Why should I participate? The involvement of multiple families will best enable the identification of the genetic cause of Celiac Disease. It is anticipated that this identification will lead to earlier diagnosis and effective treatment. What will I have to do? You will need to donate a sample of blood and release your diagnostic records. Any incurred costs will be reimbursed. All interested individuals should contact the Genetic Coordinator, Michele Pallai, at (203) 438-3582 or email: pallai@ibm.net.