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Found 7 results

  1. TL;DR Mom is a celiac. Father, Brother are lactose intolerant. Sister has IBS problems as well. I believe I have gluten allergy, even though every doctor test is negative. But I do have geno-type for celiac. Marijuana has become my only solution to stop the pain and get hours of relief. No other medicine works. but pot lets me go to work, without crapping my pants and getting paid to s$#&. Anyone else in my particular situation or does everyone else feel it differently? Hello, My name is Ryan and I am a twenty-four male, 300lbs, 6ft 4in. Ive been haunted by stomach/head aches for almost my whole life. Gaining depression in middle school, which downward spiraled by the time I was 20-21. Ive been diagnosed with Chronic Lyme Disease which is, I guess, controversial among physicians on whether or not it is actually a real thing. My Dr. gave me that diagnosis at 16, after going to him with Lyme for the 8th time. My mom figured out she was a celiac when I was 20 years old, so I then started on a gluten-free diet and felt good, but didnt realize that it was actually helping me. I went back on gluten to have the testing done, but it came back negative. So I said okay, I'm not allergic to gluten it must be my imagination or something else and went on my way. Had two more doctors tell me I probably wasnt Gluten intolerant. I then started to get serious urinary issues, and started to go to urologists. They couldnt find anything wrong, so I went to a GI and they told me nothing was wrong, after doing all the testing over the years, they said I wasnt allergic to Lactose or Gluten, however my most recent GI said I have a Geno-type for it. MFer*** I know its already here. It doesnt take but an hour and I am in gut wrenching pain and cant get off the toilet for sometimes hrs, with breaks in between (4 times on) and the pain and discomfort lasts for hrs. The doctor has put me on every kind of medicine and nothing works. He said well you dont have anything we test for, so I'm just going to say you have IBS. Which still makes sense, because there is times, I know I havent touched gluten ( I dont think, I'm not a very good label checker) or cheese and I'm still in the BR. I am currently on 50MG Amytriptaline (spelling) for the depression, urinary issue and intestinal inflammation(whether its there or not, the gastro put me on it, and it keeps the other two things at bay, so I cant go off it. However, it doesnt do too much for the stomach problem. The only solution I have found is Marijuana, which I have only recently started (1yr), but man does it make a difference. Now I can have a full time job, but I have to smoke to go to work. Which isnt my most favorite thing to do , but Ive gotten used to it and it helps me tremendously. So its become my catch all illness defeater. However, it only puts my intestines on hold(how long depending on how much pot, but usually a small amount keeps my stomach at bay for about 6-8 hrs. I can suffer the last hr at work, but at least I'm not in the bathroom for my whole shift. Which is great, its an amazing feeling to be at work without something plaguing you. I still dabble in gluten, like 1 slice of pizza, here and there (bc im supposed to be not gluten intolerant) but the devil strikes every time. Im sure Ive missed some stuff, but would like some feedback on the route I should take, get some insight, my wife said I should go to a holistic doctor, which has amazing reviews near us, but its 500 dollars cash to get the evalution and its not covered by insurance. She thinks I'm allergic to soy, which I guess is in both lactose and gluten?? But ive never been tested for that. I want some light to follow. Thanks Is it typical to feel an attack so fast? It happens between 15 minutes to 2 hrs, giving the span, but usually an hour. Does everyone react the same way to gluten? - I dont get diarrhea or constipation, I get a little of both, its loosely packed and hard to pass with excruciating pain. Other times ( I think this is the IBS part), it'll just come out of no where, but its not super painful, but I cannot hold it at all. Could all of my problems be Gluten/Lactose...or just part of it/none of it? Has anyone else gotten a negative test, but still said hell with it, Gluten Free? Are there any good, well organized mega threads for stuff to not touch if you're allergic to gluten, especially lesser known things (to avoid oops moments)
  2. Betty Wedman-St Louis, PhD, RD

    Phosphates in Processed Foods Equals Chronic Disease Concerns

    Celiac.com 07/14/2017 - Dietary phosphorus occurs naturally in foods like dairy products, animal meats and legumes. The institute of Medicine recommended dietary allowance (RDA) is 700 mg/day while the NHANES data indicates that the typical American consumes more than twice that every day. Phosphorus is considered an essential nutrient but it is increasingly being added to processed foods via additives (anti-caking agents to preserve moisture and color) or as a stabilizer, leavening agent or acidifier. Since it is not required to be listed on the label, it is difficult to know how much is being added and consumed. High levels of phosphorus is now being considered an independent predictive factor in mortality and morbidity from cardiovascular, kidney, and osteoporosis disorders. People with celiac disease need to be considering how many processed foods they are consuming as food manufacturers continue to offer increasing numbers of gluten-free processed foods. According to Packaged Facts 2012, breads, cereals and grains comprise 53% gluten-free purchases; snack foods 44%; sweet baked goods (cookies) 30%; frozen/refrigerated meals and entrees 27%; baking mixes 26% and packaged dinner/side dishes 24%. Phosphates in the form of food additives contribute to the increasing health implications when not consuming a fresh foods diet. Avoiding carbonated beverages is the best way to reduce phosphorus levels in the diet. Aside from that, the person with celiac disease must pay attention to ingredient statements that may include these declarations: tricalcium phosphate, trimagnesium phosphate, disodium phosphate, dipotassium phosphate. According to current regulations, these ingredients are safe when used in good manufacturing processes but the more one consumes prepared foods, the more elevated the blood phosphorus levels can rise. The Institute of Food Technology in its December 2012 journal states," It has been difficult for consumers to find gluten-free alternatives that taste good and have desirable texture properties. Consequently, manufacturers are looking for different ingredient solutions that will address these problems". Phosphate additives have provided that solution without consumers being aware of the health implications. Yes, the food world offers a wider array of gluten-free foods than ever before but just because it states "gluten-free" on the label does not mean it is a healthy food for everyday consumption. Remember: Fresh is Best! Here is a guide I use to help those choosing processed foods to be wiser consumers: Baked Goods: cake mixes, donuts, refrigerated dough = pyrophosphates for leavening and dough "improver". Beverages: phosphoric acid in colas for acidulant, pyrophosphate in chocolate milk to suspend cocoa, pyrophosphate in buttermilk for protein dispersion, tricalcium phosphate in orange juice for fortification, tetrasodium phospahte in strawberry flavored milk to bind iron to pink color. Cereals: phosphate in dry cereals to aid flow through extruder and fortification. Cheese: phosphoric acid in cottage cheese to set acidification, phosphate in dips, sauces, cheese slices and baked chips for emulsifying action and surface agent. Imitation Dairy Products (non-dairy products): phosphate as buffer for smooth mixing into coffee and as anti-caking agent for dry powders. Egg Products: phosphate for stability and color/foam improvement. Ice Cream: pyrophosphate to prevent gritty texture. Meat Products: tripolyphosphate for injections into ham, corned beef, sausage, franks, bologna, roast beef for moisture and color development. Nutrition Bars & Meal Replacement Drinks: phosphates for fortification and microbiological stability. Potatoes: phosphate in baked potato chips to create bubbles on surface, and pyrophosphate in French fries, hash browns, potato flakes to inhibit iron induced blackening. Poultry: tripolyphosphate for moisture and removal of Salmonella and Campylobacter bacterial pathogens. Puddings & Cheesecakes: phosphate to develop thickened texture. Seafood: tripolyphosphate in shrimp for mechanical peeling, pyrophosphate in canned tuna and crab to stabilize color and crystals, surimi ("crab/sea sticks") triphosphate and pyrophosphate as cryoprotectant to protein. For those not having food composition tables available, here is a comparison of common snack foods to show how phosphorus levels quickly can add up. Many food companies do not provide analysis information on phosphorus because it is not required for the nutrition label. Hershey Bar with Almonds - 116 mg Cola Beverage (12 oz) - 44 mg M&M Peanuts (1.74 oz pkg) - 93 mg Yogurt (1 cup) - 300 mg Total Cereal (1 cup) General Mills - 200 mg Peanuts (1 oz) - 150 mg Apple, raw (1 med) - 10 mg
  3. In the Friday, February 9, 1996 edition of the Independent newspaper (UK), there was a short article reporting research into ME (myalgic encephalomyelitis) by doctors at the Royal Hallamshire Hospital in Sheffield. Their research was published that same weeks Lancet. Mysterious symptoms, including muscle weakness, wasting, and poor coordination and balance may be due to an undiagnosed allergy to wheat, barley, oats or rye, according to new research which may have implications for some people with ME...A study of 53 patients with these and other unexplained neurological symptoms, found that nearly three-fifths of them had antibodies to gluten in their blood...none of the patients in the Sheffield group had been diagnosed with celiac disease but when samples of tissue were removed from their gut, more than a third showed evidence of the disease or inflammation of the middle and lower gut.
  4. Pediatric Allergy and Immunology Volume 16 Issue 5 Page 428 - August 2005 Celiac.com 09/27/2005 – Italian researchers have discovered a link between celiac disease and chronic urticaria (hives). The researchers conducted a case control study that screened 79 children with chronic urticaria for celiac disease, then compared the results to that of 2,545 healthy controls in order to determine the clinical relevance of any association. Children and adolescents who had chronic hives for at least 6 weeks that did not respond to oral antihistamines were used as subjects in the chronic urticaria group, and each group was screened for celiac disease via anti-transglutaminase and anti-edomysial antibodies, with confirmation done via endoscopic intestinal biopsy. The researchers found celiac disease in 4 of the 79 chronic urticaria group—a full 5%, and in 17 of the 2,545 controls (0.67%). The four children found to have celiac disease in the chronic urticaria group were put on a gluten-free diet and after 5-10 weeks their chronic urticaria symptoms completely disappeared (while it took 5-9 months for their serological tests for celiac disease to return to normal). The researchers conclude that the presence of celiac disease in children with chronic urticaria is significantly more frequent than in controls, and children with chronic urticaria should be screened for celiac disease, and, if it is found, they should be treated with a gluten-free diet.
  5. Celiac.com 05/04/2012 - Some studies have shown that people with untreated celiac disease can have higher rates of psychiatric disorders, but little study has been made to determine whether people with psychiatric disorders have higher rates of celiac disease. To answer that question, a team of researchers recently studied celiac disease in patients with chronic psychiatric disorders. The research team included Manouchehr Khoshbaten, Mohammad Rostami Nejad, Nasrin Sharifi, Ali Fakhari, Mahdyar Golamnejad, Sayed Hassan Hashemi, Pekka Collin, and Kamran Rostami The team set out to assess rates of celiac disease in Iranian patients suffering from chronic depression or schizophrenia. For their study, they screened 200 Iranian inpatient men with in chronic phase of depressive disorders or schizophrenia, along with another 200 age-matched healthy male subjects, for celiac disease using anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA antibodies. The average patient age was 37 years. This study found that one (1%) schizophrenic and two (2%) depressive patients tested positive for anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA antibodies. They noted that duodenal biopsy was not possible in these male patients. In the control group one (0.5%) individual was positive for anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA antibodies, but had normal duodenal histology. Theere was no statistical difference between patients and control group. Celiac disease serology is not significantly higher in schizophrenic and depressive inpatients than in the general population. Based on this observation, they do not advocate systematic blood screening in such patients, but they do advocate increased alertness to the possibilities of celiac disease in those patients. Source: Gastroenterology and Hepatology
  6. Celiac.com 07/10/2007 - This study demonstrates that people with celiac disease face an elevated risk of glomerulonephritis. Multiple studies have shown higher levels of celiac disease auto-antibodies in patients with renal disease; and certain renal disease will improve on a low-antigenic diet that is gluten-free. Not much is understood about the risk of severe renal disease such as renal failure in individuals with celiac disease. In a general population based cohort study, a team of researchers set out to assess the individuals with celiac disease for any form of glomerulonephritis (acute, chronic and non- specified), chronic glomerulonephritis and renal replacement therapy including dialysis treatment and kidney transplantation. The research team was made up of Anders Ekbom, Michael Fored, Jonas F. Ludvigsson, Johnny Ludvigsson, Nders ekbom, Ola Ole, & Scott M. Montgomery. They looked at data from 14,336 patients who were diagnosed with celiac disease between 1964 and 2003. Patients were chosen from the Swedish Hospital Discharge Registry. They established a control group of 69,875 individuals matched for age, calendar year, sex and county. Higher Risk of Glomerulonephritis for Celiac Patients The results showed that patients with celiac disease face an increased risk of developing chronic renal disease, and may also be at a face a slightly higher risk for any form of glomerulonephritis. Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation 2006 21(7):1809-1815 health writer who lives in San Francisco and is a frequent author of articles for Celiac.com.
  7. Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol 2000;12:541-547. (Celiac.com 07/09/2000) Researchers in Sweden released a report that shows a high number of patients with chronic diarrhea also have bile acid malabsorption. Further, steatorrhea is also common, but appears to be independent of bile acid malabsorption. Their study evaluated 94 patients with chronic diarrhea for loss of bile acids using both 75-SeHCAT and a fecal fat excretion tests. The patients also completed a symptom questionnaire before during a 7 day period before taking the 75-SeHCAT test. Dr. Kjell-Arne Ung and his colleagues from Sahlgrenska University Hospital, in Goteborg reported their finding in the the May issue of the European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. They found that mild steatorrhea was present in 50% of patients with non-organic bile acid malabsorption, and in 38% of patients with functional diarrhea. Further, low 75-SeHCAT levels alone is not an indicator or risk for steatorrhea, although some patients with severe organic disease had a concomitant malabsorption of fat and of bile acids. Dr. Ungs study also shows that severe steatorrhea was common in patients with celiac disease, even in patients with high 75-SeHCAT values. When compared with patients who had functional diarrhea, those with bile acid malabsorption had significantly more frequent and looser stools, however, abdominal pain, distension and flatulence was equal between those with bile acid malabsorption and normal bile acid absorption. In conclusion Dr. Ung and colleagues state: The high prevalence of bile acid malabsorption and the absence of specific symptoms, with the exception of frequent and liquid stools, indicates that the 75-SeHCAT test should be performed early in the investigation of patients with chronic diarrhea.
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