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Found 23 results

  1. To Forum Members, I recently was doing research in PubMed about low stomach acid and came across intriguing old research that details it's presence in/with a Celiac and DH diagnosis. see this link https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3992169 Here is the abstract in it's entirety. Scand J Gastroenterol. 1985 Mar;20(2):133-40. Gastric morphology and function in dermatitis herpetiformis and in coeliac disease. Gillberg R, Kastrup W, Mobacken H, Stockbrügger R, Ahren C. Abstract "Gastric acid secretory capacity was evaluated in 116 patients with dermatitis herpetiformis by means of the pentagastrin test. Endoscopic gastric mucosal biopsy specimens were obtained from both the body and the antrum in 90 of them. Forty-eight patients (41%) had a maximal acid output less than 10 mmol/h, and 30 of them (26%) were achlorhydric. The frequency of achlorhydria increased with age, and 27 out of 58 patients (47%) more than 50 years old were achlorhydric. Antrum-sparing chronic atrophic gastritis was present in 92% of the achlorhydric patients, and hypergastrinaemia and serum parietal cell antibodies were found in most of them. The prevalence of chronic gastritis of the body and of the antrum increased with age. There was no correlation between atrophic gastritis or achlorhydria and small-intestinal villous atrophy, the results of the D-xylose test, and blood folate and serum zinc determinations. The transferrin saturation index was lower in patients with achlorhydria. The frequency of achlorhydria was significantly higher in patients with dermatitis herpetiformis than in 69 patients with coeliac disease." The question is what does it mean? I see the high association between no stomach acid and DH as causal. (triggering) at 90+ percent a direct association. But the relatively high association of Low Stomach could only be casual (associated with) but not definitely triggering but possibly causing someone with Low/No stomach acid to be diagnosed as Celiac/NCGS patients instead. This research being 30+ years old it can be easily over looked. I have found treating my Low Stomach acid helped my GI problems. If it is an Esophageal pH Test could confirm your stomach acid levels. https://www.verywell.com/acid-reflux-ph-test-1742254 Is this definitive research in your mind that indeed no stomach acid is triggering this immune reaction. I was not expecting to find previous research that studied this topic. More Recent research on PPIs indicate low stomach caused by the use of PPIs can/could trigger a Celiac diagnosis. see this article about this topic. Does/Is low or even No stomach acid being confused for Celiac disease today? I would love to hear your thoughts? I share this research in the hope that it will rediscovered again and studied again to see if it can replicated in the hopes that treating one's Low/No stomach acid might help others. This does not mean you yourself will have low stomach acid . . but you won't know if you don't test for it. I think with this high association in those who have received a Celiac diagnosis further testing to rule low/no stomach acid is warranted. Share your thoughts, opinion, ideas and feedback. I start this thread to kick start your thinking? And to invite honest inquiry as the role stomach acid plays in GI health. It is (low stomach/no stomach) is known to be linked/occur in chronic gastritis so it seems only logical it would at least be casual in Celiac/NCGS patient. See this link on Chronic Gastritis and the prevalence of Low/No stomach in chronic gastritis. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4673514/ they estimate quoting "One may estimate that more than half of the world population have this disease in some degree and extent, indicating that even many hundreds of millions of people worldwide may have chronic gastritis in a form or other." What if the 1/3 of the population that might develop NCGS or celiac disease is just another clinical presentation of chronic gastritis? I think it what the research says to me . . triggered by either low or no stomach acid? Your thoughts and comments are encouraged but I found treating my low stomach acid helped my chronic gastritis. 2 Timothy 2:7 Please Consider what this research says and may the Lord lead you on your continued journey. I hope this research jogs your thinking. I know it confirmed mine . . but I am open to being wrong. A man/woman who corrects me is my friend. I hope this newly rediscovered research helps your thinking about how low/no stomach acid could be causing some of your GI problems forum members/friends. We are all trying to find something that works for us and why we participate to share on this forum to help others with the same help knowledge we have gained on our way/journey God being our help. 2 Corinthians (KJV) 1:3,4 3) “Blessed be God, even the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies, and the God of all comfort; 4) who comforteth us in all our tribulation, that we may be able to comfort them which are in any trouble (starfish), by the comfort wherewith we ourselves are comforted of God.” Posterboy by the grace of God,
  2. Hi guys, feeling a bit lost. I've recently been told by GP that I've 99% coeliac. I was screened after ongoing anaemia and failure to get ferritin stores up despite months of supplementation and dietary changes. My bloods were at follows: Deaminated gliadin igg 330cu Tissue transglutamise iga 72cu The diagnosis has caught me off guard as I've never had any GI issues and don't tend to eat a high gluten diet. To complicate things further, I'm 7 months pregnant. My questions are: how abnormal are my bloods and are they very suggestive of coeliac as I read biopsy is only way to truly diagnose.... Is it unrealistic to think I can cut out gluten and get my iron stores up within the month, otherwise I'm looking at a transfusion. And if I cut out gluten would you recommend going back on gluten to get 100% diagnoses once I've had my baby? Or if I'm feeling better and iron comes up just continue as is.... Thanks ?
  3. Hi everyone, I've recently got more details on my first blood test for celiac and my ALT levels were slightly higher than the normal threshold, 25 vs between 8-22. I've just had my second blood test and am waiting on the results but along with all the other usual celiac symptoms I've been having is this a good sign that I do indeed have celiac disease?
  4. Hey so im new! I had bloods earlier this week because of a few symptoms I was experiencing, I asked to be tested for milk, casein and gluten intolerances. I was hoping these would give me the answer to my acne breakouts, digestive issues and all of the other symptoms (I've had it all for a few years now) Everything came back fine, but the bloods came back positive for Coeliac! I have to wait 1-6 months for my endoscopy (public health system is shot) so I was hoping you fellow coeliacs can help me with my blood result numbers. I have no clue and it wasn't explained to me. "Tissue transglutaminase IgA Abs H 19 U/ml ( <7 ) " "Gliadin (deamidated) IgG Abs H 21 U/ml ( <7 ) " Also, can coeliac be a cause for acne/hormonal acne? Thankyou !
  5. Hello, My GP has advised a two week gluten challenge. I've never fully removed gluten from my diet but for the past year I've eaten smaller quantities. I'm on day 7 of the challenge and I've had the worst headache and bloating that I've had in ages! I feel sick and the thought of eating more wheat makes me shudder. My previous bloods have shown inflammation and high igA levels on and off. What exactly do they look for in the igA levels? Could high igA alone suggest I'm coeliac? Would one more week of eating gluten really be enough time? How long does it take to then see a gastro for a biopsy on the NHS? I'm wondering as I'm running out of time to be tested before I go travelling for 6 months and my GP isn't coeliac aware as such
  6. Hi there, just wanted to share this great new app i have found for travelling - its a multi-lingual App in voice and text with 14 languages to help when explaining that you are celiac when eating out! I travel a lot with work and have used it a couple of times now. Its been really helpful and made things so much easier when trying to explain that i cant eat gluten, tn restaurants that only speak basic English - hope it is useful for you too! https://itunes.apple.com/ca/app/coeliac-world-traveller/id1048950018?mt=8
  7. Hi all, new here! I went to docs recently for blood tests for something unrelated and when the results came back they said they think I have coeliacs disease and an under active thyroid. A work friend of my partners is a coeliac and always says she has violent d+v almost immediately if she ever accidentally eats any gluten. I, on the other hand, a nearly 30 and have always eaten whatever I liked and have no ill effects. Is it possible to be a coeliac but not have any symptoms? I've now got to wait till the end of next month to see a specialist who will then decide if they're doing a biopsy to confirm I believe. After the initial chat with the doctor about my blood results, and him explaining all the horrible things gluten/coeliacs was doing to my body it then feels really weird knowingly eating the stuff until the test, but I don't want to cut stuff out and then have a false test result. Anyone know of any sufferers who don't outwardly appear to be suffering?! I'm hoping the result will come back negative but the doc was quite sure from my blood result
  8. Being Celiac, I have taught myself how to bake using gluten free ingredients and i want to share my recipes with as many as i can so that people can realise it's not all bad and we can eat yummy things too! I'm also a small/new YouTuber and i have made a gluten free halloween cupcake recipe video, for any one that may want to check it out here's the link https://youtu.be/mTrJMB2ZYXg I'd really appreciate any feedback! Thank you Georgia x
  9. Hi hi, I guess the only way to find this out is to test it but I'm curious as to whether sensitivity (which I understand varies for different people) has a genetic component as well as the actual disease. My grandmother gets sick from glucose syrup and other things Australia lawfully deems safe and I haven't tried it yet as not willing to get sick again yet... But on this forum I've learned that the majority of people are fine with it. Which made me wonder...do you have relatives with Coeliac disease and have you inherited 'their's or your own body's version ?
  10. Hello, I'd love a little advice/information from people who probably know more about this than I do. Sorry for the slightly long post... I am 32 and female. The only real health problem I have had is endometriosis, which was diagnosed and treated in 2002 and I have had no real problems with since. I am generally very healthy. Last year, in May 2014, in began having some abdominal tenderness just above my belly button if the area was pressed (usually by my toddler's rather enthusiastic hugs!) and left-sided discomfort (waist level) at my back sort of radiating round to the side. I also felt quite full after eating only a little. My GP ordered an ultrasound, which was normal, and a whole range of blood tests, also all normal. Things continued and in September, my GP ordered a coeliac screen which came back positive. My tTGA was 15.3 (normal range 0-6.9) and endomysial antibodies were positive. At the end of November I had an endoscopy and biopsy (4 samples were taken), which came back negative for coeliac disease. In December I started experiencing problems with upper abdominal bloating and also constipation (sorry if tmi, but I could actually go four or five times a day, but just a couple of very tiny little pellets). I also began feeling lightheaded after eating and, with the exception of feeling hungry, felt so much better if I didn't eat or drink at all. So my GP repeated the coeliac screen to see if the first test was an anomaly. This time my tTGA was 35.7 (normal range 0-6.9) and endomysial antibodies were positive. My gastroenterologist (who discharged me back to my GP after the normal biopsy) said I categorically do not have coeliac disease because of the negative biopsy and to continue as normal (with no guidance as to what was causing or would help my current symptoms). My GP agrees that I don't have coeliac disease. So, my question: is there anything else that can cause a positive result on a tTGA blood test other than coeliac disease? My GP and the gastroenterologist both said false positives can occur. My GP suggested I trial a gluten-free diet, but I'm concerned this is a very strict diet and unneccesary if I don't have coeliac disease and will delay/prevent an accurate diagnosis if I do. I have a two year old son, so if I do have coeliac diease, I understand he should be tested? I don't know where to go with this now. Prior to all this starting last year, I had never even heard of coeliac disease. I also don't know if these blood tests are clouding the issue of what is actually causing my symptoms if they really are just false positives... I would really appreciate any advice or insight... Many thanks in advance!
  11. I suffered badly for 2 months prior to a blood test I had which came back equivocal for Coeliac. Unfortunately the TtG was just above normal but the Gliadin IgG was negative. However I was so keen to resolve my illness which consisted of the usual symptoms of bloating, flatulence, diarrhoea and cramps along with a few other peculiar ones like bad breath (really bad no just morning breath trust me), tongue ulcers, itchy skin and a peculiarly horrible 'hungry feeling' a lot of the time. That I quit gluten then and there and believed to notice a difference. After 3 months I 'settled' down to just the typical symptoms of digestive problems (bloating, flatulence, diarrhoea) as well as bad breath and have as of now, 4 Months down the line from stopping gluten, remained at this point. No longer with stomach cramps, itchy skin and all those other peculiarities apart from bad breath which has remained. However what I have I feel is still significant to effect my way of life. I'm not sure if this is significant enough of an improvement to warrant the belief that I have Coeliac, surely things must have alleviated by now. I guess my long winded question is the one that is the title, how long should it take for someone who has Coeliac to no longer experience symptoms so significant? I know it varies but just from your experience would be helpful to settle my mind as I am anxious I will not be getting better any time soon. Any help or comments would really be appreciated and I'd be happy to give any more info.
  12. Hey! So I'm kind of new to this, but have been lurking for a while, and have a couple of questions... For the past couple of years I'd been having issues with bloating and D (sorry), tiredness, anxiety and brain-fog, all of which got increasingly bad during last spring (to the point where I was feeling sick when eating, feeling shaky, uncoordinated and, a lot of the time, almost 'drunk' with brain-fog and lightheadedness). I went gluten-free about 2 months ago after lots of internet-browsing, and so far the bloating/D have disappeared, the anxiety and brain-fog have decreased, and I feel better within myself than I have for years! However, I'm still feeling very tired, and 'weird'. Yesterday and the day before, eg, I had just enough energy to slump around the house all day! Today I had a bit more energy (enough to go for a short cycle) but I'm still feeling quite light-headed, and it's still nowhere near the level of energy I should have. The whole summer has pretty much been a bit like this - I'm due to go back to uni in a couple of weeks, and am feeling a bit apprehensive about having enough energy to cope. I'm aware I've eaten gluten at least once (max. two times) since going gluten-free, which was definitely a bit of set-back. I haven't been diagnosed (and am really unwilling to go back to gluten for 6 weeks to take the test), so it's difficult to talk about with the doctor. I'm also a little worried because I have a friend who was recently diagnosed with Chronic Fatigue, and it's slightly disconcerting how similar my symptoms are to her's before she got really sick! So, I guess what I'm asking is; - Which symptoms did you find cleared up quickly, and which stuck around for a while? - How long did it take you to feel any difference from going gluten-free, and how long did it take you to feel completely better? - Is there any difference (in your experience/opinion) between Coeliac and Gluten Intolerance, in relation to the above two questions? - Any other tips/info/inside knowledge for a gluten-free newbie? Thanks guys! This forum's pretty much been my only source of real info so far, so I'm already pretty grateful.
  13. If anyone could help or advise I would be eternally grateful, access to information is extremely limited in the UK and from what I am increasingly discovering doctors from GP’s to specialists are pretty clueless. I originally posted my symptoms on here three months ago. Background, I was slowly recovering from the diagnosis of Coeliac Disease in March, I’d just enjoyed a fantastic weekend with my girlfriend when I was randomly hit by a huge bout of anxiety that took me off my feet. Never had a history of anxiety, had no reason to be hit by it. Symptoms that have followed include: Anxiety that is worse in the mornings, fade in the afternoon and die off after 6pm – dizziness, confusion, displacement – acid feelings in my legs, jelly arms, intercostal pain in ribs and numb limbs. It’s like ground hog day every day and this has been my life for the last 12 weeks. I have had every test imaginable Vitamins, brain scan etc and the only resulting factor is cortisol levels are too high – I have been tested for Cushings and that doesn’t appear to be conclusive. The doctors have advised taking anti anxiety meds to curb the problem but I refuse to take them as I know its not the root of the problem. I dose out on Kalms (over the counter herbal remedy) each day just to take the edge of the feelings. I am aware there are links between Coeliac and anxiety, I would be interested if anyone has experienced the same symptoms and recovered? I have taken the following to date which has had little to no success: Vitamins B, C, D – other complex vits like Berroca. I have just started taking Magnesium but a little too early to say whether this has worked or not. Any help or advice would be really appreciated. Many thanks Chris
  14. Just over a month ago I suspected that I might have Celiac Disease, so I went on a gluten free diet for one week. It was the best week of my life and I felt incredible. Then, my doctor told me to re-introduce gluten so that I could get an endoscopy done. I am really angry with her because she did not mention to me that I would only need to re-introduce gluten if I was going to put off the endoscopy for three months (I had it done within one week), and now I am needlessly suffering. I re-introduced gluten for five days (pasta/bread/pies three times a day) and i thought that I would feel amazing again as soon as I stopped eating the gluten, but it has been four weeks since then, and I still feel lousy. Has anyone else had a similar experience? How long do you think it will take me to start feeling amazing again? I am so angry with this doctor. When I initially went gluten-free, I felt incredible within days but it has been a whole month after this challenge and I am so worried I will never feel that incredible again. Please help me!
  15. Hello again, I was just wondering if anyone else had bad probelms with too much salt or fat? I ask because yesterday i ate a whole bag of salted/roasted macadamia nuts, its not a big bag but enough. I do eat them occasionally but not a whole bag. So i woke up this morning with agonising cramps in my lower stomach and the inevitable happened, really loose stool, like mud, not watery, and had to go to relieve myself a few times before the cramping died down, i also took a paracetamol because it hurt so much, i rarely, rarely do this. I think cramps are a natural thing but this morning was too much. I also had rice last night which if anything usually binds me up, but i've been reading more and more about how rice can adversly effect some people when they have too much. But i don't think i have as i havent had it for quite a few days now. So I'm wondering if people on here if they have to much salt/fat do you get these types of symptoms and does it make sense? If so I'l stay away from the amcadamias no matter how delicious they are. Thanks in advance.
  16. Hello guys, I haven't been on here fr a very long time now, but your always here and ready to help so i'm asking for help. I've been strictly gluten free for a year and a half since my diagnosis. I also cut out all dairy, soya, tomatoes and peppers. I'm a vegan by proxy. I havent eaten meat since i was 4. Most mornings I wake up, and within 10 mintues I have bad lower stomach cramps and urgency to go t the bathroom.... Were getting to the TMI bit and i apologise. Its usually a dark brown (I take iron) and i don't know how else to put it but it is like the consistency of soft ice cream, or a cowpat, now formed except a few pieces and so soft but not watery. Its horrible to be blunt. Some mornings i don't have to go at all, which is delightful, and usually after I've eaten white rice with peas and brocolli the night before. But if i keep eating rice i become constipated and thats not good. So here is my diet Morning: Breakfast cereal made from rice which is the only cereal i can have. Lunch: 6 rice cakes, two with avacado and four with sunflower spread and organic peanut butter. Snack: Apple, Banana or a handful of almonds if i have them. Dinner: Rice with peas and brocolli, Mashed potato with peas and brocolli, gluten-free pasta with gluten-free/df/sf pesto with brocolli and cucumber. I also do not drink any caffeine, i drink herbal teas and water. Occasionally elderflower cordial. I have cut most corn out of my diet as i was having sweetcorn and it improved things for a little while which i was super excited about but it came and smacked my smile off my face. The only remaining corn in my diet is a small section of my pasta is made with it. I was thinking maybe it was the potato as i can't tolerate any other nightshades, but tbh my gastro issues aren't much better anymore from not having them so i don't even know anymore... All my hair/make up etc are wheat free/gluten free etc. I'm so careful about CC, it basically isn't possible. I never eat out. I don't even generally go out! I go to the gym every day because i have osteopenia at the moment and they don't want me taking calcium tablets because of possible heart problems that run in my family. So I'm doing weight bearing excersises to increase my bone density instead which apparently is better for you anyway. THIS SUCKS. I'm open to all suggestions, please anything... I'm so sick of feeling this way. Of my stomach controlling my life.
  17. Hi, I am very upset and apologise in advance for the length and detail of this post. I live in Perth, Australia, and believe I have discovered more information on celiac.com relating to gluten health issues than any doctor has ever been able to provide. Bit of background, I am 21 and have always suffered from hay fever, worse than anyone in my family. I get bruised easily, my right knee is totally stuffed and both knees crack when I bend them. I love to run, although my knees (and occasionally hips) set me short. My hair has always been thin and dull, and apparenly I have "big glands/lymph nodes" in my neck. I have always been thinner than my two siblings (though my BMI is normal), however I have a pot belly. We have history of diabetes, high blood pressure, vertigo, chronic migraines and mild gluten intolerance in the family. No one in my family has been for a colonoscopy, endoscopy, or thoroughly tested for celiacs. In March 2009 I began to experience very sudden, short and uncomfortable stabbing pains in my intestines/stomach region - as if something sharp just wriggled around to 'ease through'. These pains would last for a couple of seconds, causing me to double over in pain. Occasionally they would last longer than a few seconds, like a dull cramp that eventually reached a 'stab'. Pregnancy was out of the question. I couldn't eat anything and lost 15 kg. I had diarrhea, a constant fever, cramps - the doctor put me on gastro medication and didn't give me a blood test. I woke in the middle of the night with a temperature of 42.6 C - my mother took me to a different doctor and demanded a blood test. My white blood cell count was astronomical - apparently I had been suffering appendicitis for the past month, and since the doctors were unable to locate my appendix on the scan due to accumulation of fluid/gas in my intestines, we had to assume the fever resulted after it ruptured. I had key hole surgery because the surgeons didn't know what was going on. Has anyone with celiacs experienced these symptoms??? For the majority of 2010 I didn't eat very much gluten. I was on antibiotics and painkillers. I was never hungry and after losing 15 kg I preferred to eat 'lighter' types of food, such as salads and fruit. However, I ate crumbed calamari and a variety of sauces. Life was beginning to return to normal when I experienced a very unsightly rash on the right side of my face and body. I was also experiencing depression, crying for no reason, dandruff and mild intestinal pains (doctors said it was abdominal adhesions from my operation, undetectable on ultrasounds, couple of years to form, can lead to blockages, food intolerance, stomach cancer, all that jazz). I was put on acne medication. I requested another blood test - coeliac said 'negative', however by that stage I was not consuming obvious forms of gluten (bread, pasta, pizza) because I preferred to eat light. In 2011 I started a food diary that proved eating products containing gluten caused stomach aches, dizziness, tiredness, depression, irritability and headaches. I decided to avoid gluten completely in 2012. I have been paleo since February and have been feeling absolutely fantastic. I became extremely fit and my appetite diminished. My hair looks very shiny, my complexion is better than usual and people think I'm on drugs because I'm so happy and glowing. I can go all night without sleep and bounce back the following day, no troubles, all I want to do is exercise. However, after consuming corn chips/a teaspoon of unusual dip at a gluten-free restaurant, my entire face broke out in a rash - red cheeks, forehead, swollen jowels. I looked a bit like an orange hamster. Fatigue set in, and I was in an irritable and depressed mood. Just as things were returning to normal, I consumed a large amount of gluten-free cakes during a family gathering, and probably corn/dairy products. The pain in my stomach was very dull, but it was there. I was constipated. After a couple of days of mild stomach discomfort, it skyrocketed. I could feel something snaking (almost sharp and flipping, like a cut) through my intestines - very sore and tender to touch, the pain was concentrated on the right side across from my belly button and under my ribs. It slowly travelled around to the left side, then moved under my belly button. I was sweating, couldn't breathe properly, irritable, sleepy, lost motivation, wanted to eat everything I could see and puke up my guts at the same time. 3 days stuck on the toilet. I had bladder problems, urinating constantly, it felt like a combination of a UTI and thrush. I wasn't digesting anything - it just went straight through me. That was nearly 2 weeks ago. I'm slowly returning to normal, although I feel very depressed, not chatty, irritable, mild pain is present roughly 15cm to the right of my bellybutton and my pot belly is back. I can't exercise or focus on studying for my exams. Needless to say, I'm back on paleo. Has anyone had a similar experience?? Do I have coeliac disease or a gluten allergy? Will a colonoscopy or endoscopy show results, even if I'm off gluten? Any help is greatly appreciated and thank you so much for taking the time to share in my journey.
  18. Scand J Gastroenterol 1999 Sep;34(9):909-14 AW Morrow Gastroenterology and Liver Centre, Dept of Histopathology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia. SPECIAL NOTE: European Codex Alimentarius quality wheat starch was used in this study. (Celiac.com 06/25/2000) BACKGROUND: It is expected that in patients with coeliac disease the small bowel mucosal mucosa will return to normal if they adhere to a gluten-free diet (GFD). However, in many this is not the case. This study aims to determine whether this persistent villous atrophy (VA) could be due to continued ingestion of the trace amounts of gluten in gluten-free foods, as defined by the WHO/FAO Codex Alimentarius. METHODS: Duodenal biopsy specimens from 89 adults with long-standing coeliac disease were examined, and the findings correlated with their form of gluten-free diet. RESULTS: In 51 subjects the duodenal specimen was normal, whereas in 38 there was villous atrophy (partial, 28; subtotal, 8; total, 2). There was no relationship between the presence or absence of VA and ingestion of either a GFD as defined by the Codex Alimentarius (Codex-GFD; 39 patients) or a GFD that contained no detectable gluten (NDG diet: 50 patients). Intraepithelial lymphocyte counts were higher, and lactase levels lower, in subjects with an abnormal biopsy specimen than in those in whom it was normal. However, within each of these biopsy groups there was no difference in these variables between patients on a Codex-GFD and those on an NDG-GFD. IgA antigliadin antibody was detected in 4 of 29 patients on a Codex-GFD and in 3 of 13 on a NDG-GFD (NS). CONCLUSION: The persistent mucosal abnormalities seen in patients with coeliac disease on a GFD are not due to the ingestion of trace amounts of gluten. The consequences of these abnormalities have yet to be determined.
  19. Source: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, 18:(2):299-304, 1983 Mar. Authors - Hallert C., Astrom J., Walan A. Signs of mental depression are typical in adults with coeliac disease. The response to treatment was evaluated in 12 consecutive patients by means of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI), with surgical patients serving as controls. The coeliacs reported no change in depressive symptoms after 1 years gluten withdrawal despite evidence of improvement in the small intestine. When re-tested after 3 years, however, after 6 months of 80mg/day of oral pyridoxine (vitamin B6) therapy, they showed a fall in the score of scale 2 (depression) from 70 to 56 (p less than 0.01), which became normalized like other pretreatment abnormalities in the MMPI. Cholecycstectomy in the control subjects produced no alterations in the MMPI profile. The results indicate a causal relationship between adult coeliac disease and concomitant depressive symptoms which seems to implicate metabolic effects from pyridoxine deficiency influencing central mechanisms regulating mood.
  20. Scand J Gastroenterol 2000 Sep;35(9):947-9 Lohiniemi S, Maki M, Kaukinen K, Laippala P, Collin P. Dept. of Medicine, Tampere University Hospital, University of Tampere, Finland. SPECIAL NOTE: European Codex Alimentarius quality wheat starch was used in this study. (Celiac.com 06/25/2000) BACKGROUND: A wheat starch-based gluten-free diet is widely adopted in the treatment of coeliac disease, even though the products contain trace amounts of gluten. The aim here was to establish whether such a diet sustains abdominal symptoms. METHODS: The Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS) was applied to 58 coeliac disease patients on gluten-free diets and 110 non-coeliac controls. An estimate was made of daily dietary fiber and wheat starch-derived gluten. Psychological well-being was evaluated by a structured interview. Twenty-three coeliac patients consented to small bowel biopsy. RESULTS: The mean GSRS score in coeliac disease patients did not differ from that in control subjects. Poorer psychological well-being was associated with abdominal symptoms in coeliac patients, whereas the daily amount of wheat starch had no effect on GSRS score. Overall dietary compliance was good, and villous atrophy was found in only 2 out of 23 patients. The average fiber consumption, 13 g per day, was lower than recommended. CONCLUSIONS: Wheat starch-based gluten-free products are well-tolerated in coeliac disease patients, provided that their diets are otherwise strict.
  21. Scand J Gastroenterol 1999 Feb;34(2):163-9 PMID: 10192194, UI: 99206412 Authors: Kaukinen K, Collin P, Holm K, Rantala I, Vuolteenaho N, Reunala T, Maki M Dept. of Medicine, Tampere University Hospital, Finland. (Celiac.com 05/14/2000) SPECIAL NOTE: European Codex Alimentarius quality wheat starch was used in this study. BACKGROUND: We investigated whether wheat starch-based gluten-free products are safe in the treatment of gluten intolerance. METHODS: The study involved 41 children and adults with coeliac disease and 11 adults with dermatitis herpetiformis adhering to a gluten-free diet for 8 years on average. Thirty-five newly diagnosed coeliac patients at diagnosis and 6 to 24 months after the start of a gluten-free diet and 27 non-coeliac patients with dyspepsia were investigated for comparison. Daily dietary gluten and wheat starch intake were calculated. Small bowel mucosal villous architecture, celiac disease3+, alphabeta+, and gammadelta+ intraepithelial lymphocytes, mucosal HLA-DR expression, and serum endomysial, reticulin, and gliadin antibodies were investigated. RESULTS: Forty of 52 long-term-treated patients adhered to a strict wheat starch-based diet and 6 to a strict naturally gluten-free diet; 6 patients had dietary lapses. In the 46 patients on a strict diet the villous architecture, enterocyte height, and density of alphabeta+ intraepithelial lymphocytes were similar to those in non-coeliac subjects and better than in short-term-treated coeliac patients. The density of gammadelta(+)cells was higher, but they seemed to decrease over time with the gluten-free diet. Wheat starch-based gluten-free flour products did not cause aberrant upregulation of mucosal HLA-DR. The mucosal integrity was not dependent on the daily intake of wheat starch in all patients on a strict diet, whereas two of the six patients with dietary lapses had villous atrophy and positive serology. CONCLUSION: Wheat starch-based gluten-free flour products were not harmful in the treatment of coeliac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis.
  22. Scand J Gastroenterol 1999 Feb;34(2):163-9 PMID: 10192194, UI: 99206412 Authors: Kaukinen K, Collin P, Holm K, Rantala I, Vuolteenaho N, Reunala T, Maki M Dept. of Medicine, Tampere University Hospital, Finland. (Celiac.com 05/14/2000) SPECIAL NOTE: European Codex Alimentarius quality wheat starch was used in this study. BACKGROUND: We investigated whether wheat starch-based gluten-free products are safe in the treatment of gluten intolerance. METHODS: The study involved 41 children and adults with coeliac disease and 11 adults with dermatitis herpetiformis adhering to a gluten-free diet for 8 years on average. Thirty-five newly diagnosed coeliac patients at diagnosis and 6 to 24 months after the start of a gluten-free diet and 27 non-coeliac patients with dyspepsia were investigated for comparison. Daily dietary gluten and wheat starch intake were calculated. Small bowel mucosal villous architecture, CD3+, alphabeta+, and gammadelta+ intraepithelial lymphocytes, mucosal HLA-DR expression, and serum endomysial, reticulin, and gliadin antibodies were investigated. RESULTS: Forty of 52 long-term-treated patients adhered to a strict wheat starch-based diet and 6 to a strict naturally gluten-free diet; 6 patients had dietary lapses. In the 46 patients on a strict diet the villous architecture, enterocyte height, and density of alphabeta+ intraepithelial lymphocytes were similar to those in non-coeliac subjects and better than in short-term-treated coeliac patients. The density of gammadelta(+)cells was higher, but they seemed to decrease over time with the gluten-free diet. Wheat starch-based gluten-free flour products did not cause aberrant up-regulation of mucosal HLA-DR. The mucosal integrity was not dependent on the daily intake of wheat starch in all patients on a strict diet, whereas two of the six patients with dietary lapses had villous atrophy and positive serology. CONCLUSION: Wheat starch-based gluten-free flour products were not harmful in the treatment of coeliac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis.
  23. Dr. Lionel Fry from the U.K. talked about DH. He stated that all patients with DH have some degree of enteropathy, even though less than 1 in 10 patients with DH have GI symptoms. Dr. Fry also said 40 percent of DH relatives have gluten-sensitive enteropathy. He went on to say that the gluten-free diet can take 6 months to two years to get healing of DH, and a relapse of the DH rash may take 2 to 12 weeks to occur after someone eats gluten. Total disappearance of IGA skin deposits may take up to 7 years after a gluten-free diet is started. Dr. Reunala from Finland talked about associated diseases. He quoted others who said 5 to 14 percent of DH patients have thyroid disease and went on to say that DH patients have an increased incidence of lymphoma but a gluten-free diet seems to protect against lymphoma.
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