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Found 5 results

  1. Celiac.com 07/04/2017 - Once upon a time, maintaining a gluten-free diet was a challenge, especially for college kids. In many ways, it still is, as college students face numerous challenges that others do not. However, things are changing, and much of that change is being driven by colleges and universities seeking to better serve their students with food sensitivities and allergies. More and more, colleges in America are doing more to step up their food services for their students with food allergies and sensitivities. Cornell University has quietly worked to phase gluten out of its main dining hall. For the last several years, students and others have been enjoying various gluten-free meals at Risley Dining Room without fanfare. From rice noodles at stir-fry station, to gluten-free flour in the brownies and biscuits. A recent gluten-free facility certification from Kitchens with Confidence, allowed Cornell to re-introduce Risley Dining as a 100% gluten-free, tree-nut-free, and peanut-free kitchen. In 2016, Kent State University became the first university in the country to feature an entirely gluten-free dining hall on campus. The move to convert Kent State's Prentice Café to gluten-free facility has helped the university emerge as a leader in gluten-free campus food services. Meanwhile, out west, Mills College is working hard to make sure the meals are good to eat and good for the planet. Their dining facility serves local and organic ingredients as much as possible, and prepare food from scratch in small batches to keep dishes fresh and healthy. Mills' website describes their food as "fresh, locally sourced, and delicious." Food and drink website the Daily Meal regularly lists Mills in its 75 Best Colleges for Food in America, while the Princeton Review consistently names Mills as one of the greenest colleges in the nation. Other colleges and universities that earn high gluten-free food marks are Baylor University, Tennessee University, Georgetown University, Oregon State, Bard College, University of Wisconsin Madison, Southern Methodist University, University of Arizona, Ithaca College,Texas A&M, University of Notre Dame, University of New Hampshire, SUNY Potsdam, and Tufts University. Source: thecampanil.com
  2. Celiac.com 03/29/2017 - The March news regarding new gluten-free eateries shows that the most impactful news coming out of US colleges is about more than just basketball. The gluten-free eating scene at US colleges is enjoying a surge of popularity, as more schools are catering to the dietary needs of students with food allergies and sensitivities with dedicated facilities and inspired food offerings. With the recent reopening of Risley Dining hall, Cornell University welcomes the second certified gluten-free college eatery in the U.S., following Kent State. After working for two years to remove gluten from their dining hall menu, slowly adding items like rice noodles, gluten-free biscuits and brownies, Cornell's main eatery is now certified 100% gluten-free, peanut free, and tree-nut free. University of South Carolina recently debuted not one, but two new campus eateries for students, staff and visitors looking for gluten-free dining. Campus staple, Naturally Woodstock, now offers exclusively gluten-free food options, while Plan-It-Healthy also offers an entirely gluten-free menu. Meanwhile, Tulane University's Bruff Commons dining hall debuted a new, dedicated food prep station that serves fresh allergen-free food. Called Simple Servings by Sodexo, the allergen-free serving line features two fresh meals twice a day — usually a meat with a vegetable and a gluten-free carbohydrate, said company dietitian Kelsey Rosenbaum. The eateries at University of South Carolina and Tulane are working with Sodexo, a quality of life services company to provide gluten-free food services. Sodexo says that Tulane's cafeteria is the first allergen-free fresh food option at a Louisiana university. As more and more colleges emulate the success of programs such as these, look for gluten-free, allergen-free options to become the norm, rather than the exception. Read more: theadvocate.com 14850.com satprnews.com
  3. Celiac.com 07/13/2015 - Gluten-free students at two elite liberal arts colleges in suburban Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, are now able to enjoy exclusive gluten-free dining areas. Both Haverford College and Bryn Mawr College have created dedicated, exclusively gluten-free dining areas for their students with celiac disease or gluten intolerance, according to a report by Campus Reform. Bryn Mawr opened their gluten-free dining area in 2013, and Haverford followed in 2014. The exclusive eating areas are the brainchild of Bernie Chung-Templeton, executive director of dining services at both schools. Each of the gluten-free dining areas has signage clearly warning students to refrain from bringing in food from outside, including the main school cafeteria. What do you think? Do students with celiac disease or gluten intolerance deserve dedicated, exclusively gluten-free dining options? Read more in Campus Reform.
  4. Celiac.com 10/04/2013 - As part of a nationwide change on the part of colleges and universities to address food allergies and sensitivities, more and more campuses are offering gluten-free foods to their students. Here is a list of some of the most notable so far, in alphabetical order: BARD COLLEGE Bard College is currently renovating one of their main dining halls to include a new gluten-free section. BAYLOR UNIVERSITY At Baylor University, students can find a wide range of gluten-free menu options through the school’s dining services. Information on gluten-free meals, dining halls and menu items will meet their needs through the menus posted online each week. CARLETON COLLEGE At Carleton College, each dining hallo offers a dedicated gluten free station with the same options as non-gluten-free students and are offered one naturally gluten-free entrée at every meal, along with dessert. Annual staff training on proper handling of gluten-free food at the dedicated gluten free station in each dining hall. CLARK UNIVERSITY Clark University, every meal served in the campus dining hall is made from scratch and most recipes are modified to be gluten free. In fact, Clark only serves meals that have a gluten-free equivalent. The dining hall also offers is also a separate “My Zone” area for students to access gluten free pasta and pizza, as well as cooking utensils and small appliances. To keep sharp on safe allergy food handling, food staff at Clark University train every morning as new meals go on the menu. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY The dietitian at Columbia goes the extra mile for gluten free students: orientating them around nearby markets, introducing the chef, and even teaching them how to read nutrition labels! Columbia's chef prepares two 100% gluten free meals every day, and takes special requests. EMORY UNIVERSITY A gluten-free station in the main dining hall includes hot meals, gluten free staples, and desserts. Everything on the salad bar and all salad dressing are gluten free. Emory kitchen staff is trained through the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness’s GREAT Kitchens Program. GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY Students have access to a gluten free designated station where they can find similar gluten free staples. Everything is labeled with a unique gluten free logo to ensure safety and to avoid cross contamination. Dining hall staff is trained repeatedly throughout each semester to understand dietary restrictions and how they can best accommodate each different food sensitivity. The registered dietitian on campus also works hand-in-hand with the Gluten-Free Foodies student organization to make sure students’ needs are being reached and ideas are being shared. IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY Gluten free dining is available at all campus locations at Iowa State University in order to ensure that all students are receiving a proper diet. Dining staff is trained specifically to each dietary need and managers keep a close tab on all operations. Students have access to a designated area with its own refrigerator, freezer, dry storage, cooking utensils and small appliances. Besides the full service area, students are also able to request individually made meals or sign up for a gluten-free meal schedule. ITHACA COLLEGE Gluten free meals are available within all dining halls on campus at Ithaca College, as well as at all campus-wide events. The main dining hall in the student center offers daily gluten-free menus for both lunch and dinner. Students can pre-order gluten-free meals at the campus' other two dining halls through the dining hall management. The campus also offers a Gluten-Free Pantry, which provides gluten-free breads, pastas, and equipment like microwaves and toasters. Special labeling on all products ensures safety and security of gluten-free food. There is also a Food Allergy Awareness Club on campus to support all students with dietary restrictions. OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY Oregon State offers students a list of all of the gluten-free options served in each on-campus dining hall or cafe. At some locations, these options may be limited, but at larger dining halls, gluten-intolerant students will find a wide range of safe, healthy and tasty gluten-free food. A registered dietician is on hand to make sure that dietary considerations are met. SOUTHERN METHODIST UNIVERSITY Southern Methodist recently created a dining hall called Healthy on the Hilltop which serves vegan and gluten-free food. SMU offers students a registered dietician who can help to design a healthy eating program and provide gluten-free options and equipment to students. SUNY POTSDAM Gluten-free students at SUNY Potsdam have plenty of options to choose from. The school’s deli offers a variety of gluten-free breads, and the schools dining halls offer separate stations in the dining halls for gluten-free eaters. TEXAS A&M, CORPUS CHRISTI Students at Texas A&M in Corpus Christi will find dining halls with products like rice cereal, gluten-free pizza, soups, snacks, and desserts, and many veggies. They can also get help from the school’s registered dietician in finding healthy and safe meal options. TUFTS UNIVERSITY Tuft issues lists all gluten-free foods served at dining halls across campus. Students can work with Tuft's dietician, but can also find information on all menu items through “food fact cards.” Tufts also issues educational pamphlets that describe gluten-free dining options and preparation methods. UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA To ensure safety of gluten-free meal, each gluten-free order is prepared and served by a dedicated service member with special colored gloves. Also, the UA features a very active Gluten Free Club.. UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT UCONN offers a wide variety of gluten-free foods, including bread, pasta, and desserts (which are baked off-site to prevent cross contamination). UCONN offers at least one gluten free meal option on the menu each day. UCONN students always have access to a gluten free designated area with several additional options, including dedicated, gluten-free-only toasters in all facilities, and with a dietitian who checks up on students with special diets several times a year. UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO: BOULDER At University of Colorado at Boulder, all school menus list the presence of any of the top eight food allergens (fish, eggs, dairy, shellfish, tree nuts, peanuts, soy, wheat AND gluten) for all items. They have also cracked down on creating stricter cooking environments to ensure that a food marked as gluten free is truly 100% gluten free- an easy detail that many universities let slip by! UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE University of New Hampshire students can access gluten-free products in each of the three dining halls on campus, Students can find a gluten-free zone with restricted microwaves, toasters, and refrigerators, as well as a selection of prepackaged gluten-free items like cereal, bread, granola bars, waffles, desserts, and condiments. Students can also choose to pre-order meals or cook their own stir fry or omelets in separate gluten-restricted stations. UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME Gluten-free eaters at Notre Dame have their own private dining area located within the main dining center. Once students meet with the school’s registered dietitian, they have access to gluten free items at all dining locations, convenience stores, and on-campus restaurants. Notre Dame has listed all the menu items they serve on campus that are free of gluten. Students can search by dining hall for entrées, sides, and snacks that are gluten-free. All ND dining staff are trained and understand the severity of food allergies, and everything is carefully labeled on recipes, ingredient containers, menus, and online databases. UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE Students with gluten intolerance can take advantage of gluten-free options both in residential dining halls and in campus stores. A professional campus nutrition coordinator can help students eat healthy meals and avoid potentially harmful gluten. For students who still can’t find what they need, the school offers the option of making special gluten-free meal orders ahead of time. UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN In addition to a thriving student club on campus advocating for gluten-free options, UW Madison provides daily gluten-free options, including Thai noodles with tofu, tostadas, and enchiladas. Weekly online menus list gluten-free options. YALE UNIVERSITY Yale's website says that Yale can specially order gluten free breads, cereals, pastas, and more. They will also take extra measures to follow gluten free preparation requirements for any student who asks. People with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance will be glad to know that these colleges are not alone. They are part of a nationwide effort on the part of colleges and universities to address food allergies. As such, more changes are coming soon to campuses near you, so stay tuned. Meantime, let us know what you think of this trend by colleges to provide gluten-free food for students. Resources: Bestcollegesonline, thecampusceliac, and udisglutenfree. For more information, read the College Gluten Survey
  5. Celiac.com 03/29/2013 - Parents of children with food allergies can take heart in recent developments at the federal level that are mandating changes in the ways colleges and universities address food-allergy issues in their students. A recent federal civil rights settlement between the Department of Justice and Lesley University that arose from Lesley's failure to provide gluten-free food shows that traditional one-style-fits-all dining options are no longer an ­option for our institutions of higher learning. The settlement requires Lesley to “continually provide” students with gluten-free dining options and pay $50,000 in damages to ensure the university is in compliance with a federal law that protects people with disabilities. As a result, more and more universities are scrambling to make safe food alternatives available to students with severe food allergies, including those with celiac disease, as required by the under the Americans with Disabilities Act. This adjustment includes gluten-free food offerings, and colleges and universities in Massachusetts are among the first to attempt the adjustment. Their approaches differ slightly, but the goal is to provide a safe, reliable dining experience to students with food allergies. The University of Massachusetts Boston and Boston University have created gluten-free zones in cafeterias and food courts, while others are taking a more individual approach. Tufts and Harvard University, for example, are having nutritionists and dining hall staff work with students to figure out what prepared foods can and cannot be eaten and ordering specialty items as necessary. Tufts' plan also includes establishing a dedicated freezer-refrigerator unit in its two dining halls that is stocked with gluten-free foods. The units are kept locked, and only students with special dietary needs are given keys UMass Amherst publishes dining hall menus online, and identifies gluten-free offerings with a special icon. The school also has an extensive handout on what foods to avoid and whom to contact if students need gluten-free food. About a year ago, UMass Boston created a gluten-free zone in its food court, with a dedicated refrigerator, microwave, and toaster to minimize the risk of contamination. Look for the trend to continue as more and more colleges deal with the new legal realities of feeding students who have food allergies. Sources: http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2013/01/16/college-dining-halls-latest-challenge-gluten-free/ZGWMFABp0ruPI87L8BV8wM/story.html http://www.dailynebraskan.com/news/article_32cd62de-6908-11e2-951f-0019bb30f31a.html
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