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Found 8 results

  1. Celiac.com 07/31/2017 - For a time, it looked like gluten-free Catholics might be able to take full communion with special gluten-free wafers. But, gluten-free Catholics hoping to enjoy both the wine and the bread of a full communion had their hopes dashed this week, when the Church put the kibosh on gluten-free communion wafers. The decision was announced in a letter to bishops by Cardinal Robert Sarah, prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Sacraments, and read, in part: "The bread used in the celebration of the Most Holy Eucharistic Sacrifice must be unleavened, purely of wheat, and recently made so that there is no danger of decomposition...It follows therefore that bread made from another substance, even if it is grain, or if it is mixed with another substance different from wheat to such an extent that it would not commonly be considered wheat bread, does not constitute valid matter for confecting the Sacrifice and the Eucharistic Sacrament." He has said the bread can be low-gluten, but the wheat must contain enough protein for it to be made without additives. According to Roman Catholic doctrine, the bread and wine served at the Eucharist are converted into the body and blood of Christ through a process known as transubstantiation. Gluten-free Catholics will still be able to take communion, as the church holds that simply taking the wine is sufficient to receive communion. Still, the ruling, which must be followed by the 1.2 billion Catholics around the globe, is bound to disappoint numerous gluten-free members. Share your thoughts below. Source: Telegraph.co.uk
  2. Hi, I am new here and I was diagnosed about a year ago with NCGS. I am sensitive enough that I need my own toaster, my own jar of peanut butter, etc but I can drink the "de-glutened" beers that seem to bother some. I have accepted that I can never again eat anything or anywhere new without scouring labels and Googling everything but there is one thing that still bothers me - I am Catholic. The core of the Catholic Mass is Communion, which I can no longer have because it is made of unleavened wheat. I get stressed every time I go up for Communion and cross my arms to get a gluten-free blessing because this is what is supposed to bring us together and I feel left out. I read that there are some awesome nuns sonwhere that created a low-gluten host but I am wondering: (1) Has anyone tried this?, (2) How do you ensure that you get that and with no cross-containation? I was thinking I might became an EMOHC and just always serve in that capacity so that I can ensure I get the right host untainted by the wheat versions. I would love any and all advice.
  3. Celiac.com 08/09/2012 - Among many gluten-free catholics, there's been a good deal of excitement lately about low-gluten and gluten-free communion wafers for Mass in the Catholic church. However, much of that excitement seems to have been misplaced, at least in Ohio. That's because the Catholic Diocese of Columbus recently said that gluten-free wafers don’t meet Vatican standards because they don’t contain wheat. For Catholics, consecrated bread and wine are the literal body and blood of Jesus, and the sacrament of Holy Eucharist is “the heart and the summit of the Church’s life,” according to its catechism. Because Jesus ate wheat bread with his apostles before his Crucifixion, church law requires the host to be wheat and only wheat, said Deacon Martin Davies, director of the Office for Divine Worship at the Diocese of Columbus. Without wheat, the wafers cannot be consecrated and used in Mass, so no gluten-free wafers. In 1995, the Vatican said low-gluten hosts are valid if they hold enough gluten to make bread. Worshippers wanting the low-gluten option were required to present a medical certificate and obtain a bishop’s approval. The policy was loosened in 2003 to eliminate the medical-certificate requirement and to allow pastors to grant approval. The Vatican also said that Catholics with celiac disease could receive Communion via wine only. However, for faithful catholics with celiac disease and gluten intolerance who want to participate more fully, the low-gluten version, which some say tastes terrible, remains the only communion wafer option. U.S. Catholic bishops have approved two manufacturers of low-gluten wafers. One is the Benedictine Sisters of Perpetual Adoration in Missouri; the order’s website says it has provided hosts for more than 2,000 celiac sufferers. The other is Parish Crossroads in Indiana, which provides low-gluten hosts made in Germany. The low-gluten wafers made by the Benedictine Sisters contain less than 100 parts per million, says Mary Kay Sharrett, a clinical dietitian at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. She said the amount of gluten in one of the hosts is 0.004 milligrams and that researchers have found it takes about 10 milligrams per day to start a reaction. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has proposed a rule that says products could be labeled gluten-free if the gluten content is less than 20 parts per million. Source: The Columbus Dispatch
  4. Celiac.com 10/13/2010 - Until now Catholics with gluten-sensitivity have found it difficult to participate fully in Mass by consuming the communion wafers, which traditionally contain gluten. To address that situation, the Benedictine Sisters of Perpetual Adoration in Clyde, Mo., have developed a Communion host that is extremely low in gluten – allowing Catholics with gluten sensitivity an alternative to taking only the cup during communion. Low-gluten communion wafers mean that more Catholics with gluten-sensitivity will be able to consume both the body and the blood of the host, both the communion wafer and the wine, in their celebration of Mass. Canon law and tradition require that communion wafers contain a percentage of wheat for a valid celebration of Eucharist, said Timothy Johnston, Director of Liturgy of the Catholic Diocese of Salt Lake City. However, the host made by the Benedictine Sisters of Perpetual Adoration contains gelatinized wheat starch. The sisters report the hosts test to a level of 0.01 percent gluten. The Secretariat for the Liturgy of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops has stated that these hosts meet the requirements of the Code of Canon Law (924 §2) and may be used at the celebration of the Eucharist with permission of the person’s pastor. “They are the only group of sisters (or Catholic group at that) that make valid low-gluten hosts. Any other company or group is not approved for use during the liturgy,” Johnston said. He encourages Catholics with gluten-sensitivity who wish to learn more to begin a discussion with their pastor so that each may understand the church doctrine and teaching regarding low-gluten hosts, as well as the practical steps necessary for Holy Communion. Johnston also advises Catholics who wish to receive the low-gluten wafer to discuss the matter in advance with the celebrant and Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion so that everyone is comfortable with the procedure. “There are several parishes that use low-gluten hosts,” Johnston said, including St. Andrew, the Cathedral of the Madeleine and Saint Thomas More. Responding in a letter to expressions of gratitude from many Catholics with gluten-sensitivity, the Sisters of Perpetual Adoration write that they are “inspired by the deep desire of those suffering from gluten intolerance to receive Holy Communion…[and] humbled by the many letters, emails, and phone calls we have received thanking us for our efforts to produce low gluten altar bread.” The letter adds that the Sisters “blessed to have the opportunity to allow God to work through our hands…[and] honored and privileged to provide for you and your parish the bread that becomes the Body of Christ.” Obviously, since the new wafers are not completely gluten-free, questions of individual sensitivity will need to be addressed. However, this is a huge step toward allowing people with gluten sensitivity to take both the body and the blood when taking communion. Source: Intermountain Catholic News
  5. Celiac.com 04/12/2016 - A mainline Protestant pastor has not been found guilty of failing to serve gluten-free bread during communion and has not been defrocked for said indiscretion. An article credited to one Ligonberry Fields, described as a "Buzzvine Contributor," recently appeared on the Christianpost and stated that one Frankie Shaver was relieved of her duties as senior pastor of Cheap Grace United Methodist Church on Wednesday, after being found guilty by a tribunal headed by members of the Kansas-Alabama Board of Ordained Ministry (KA BOOM). The article included what appear to be numerous attempts at humor, many lost or muddled due to questionable syntax. Consider this description of "one UMCer, who requested anonymity and gender inclusive language when speaking to the press." Per the article: "The, um, clergyperson then went on to explained that at his – derp! – their church, they only pretend to serve gluten free bread by having a person holding what appears to be morsels of gluten-less communion." Or this quote, attributed to Allie Nobel, member of KA BOOM: "What the former pastor of CG UMC did was inexcusable and worse yet, might have alienated the people we are desperately trying our best to cave in to." The dead giveaway might have been the part that read: "KA BOOM's explosive news has sent a shock wave among UMC clergy, who before this assumed that the punishment for being caught without gluten free bread was, at worst, being forced to write a 5,000-word Adam Hamilton book review." Beyond the headline, I'm not sure how any of this is supposed to be funny, though I take it that the writer intended this simply as wry, politically incorrect humor directed at gluten-free communion supporters, rather than as any direct disparagement of gluten-free communion supporters, in general, "clergypersons" (sic) included. But, since the article was not serious, no actual pastors were defrocked for failing to serve gluten-free communion. Which is a good thing, I think. Read more at Christianpost.com.
  6. Celiac.com 11/26/2014 - Catholics with celiac disease received some hopeful news recently, when the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops voted overwhelmingly in favor of drafting of a revision to the Guidelines for the Celebration of the Sacraments with Persons with Disabilities. The vote was 207 bishops in favor and one against, with one abstention. The bishops voted to change the guideline to accommodate people with celiac disease and others who cannot consume wheat, and have been unable to take full communion. Because churches are required to serve communion wafers that contain wheat, numerous people have been unable to consume the wafers, and have thereby been missing out on what many deem to be a crucial part of communion. Some Catholic churches have tried to accommodate people with celiac disease and gluten sensitivities by offering low-gluten communion wafers. However, even the low-gluten versions approved by the church generally did not meet the FDA standards requiring less than 20 parts per million of gluten, and were thus unacceptable to many with celiac disease or severe gluten sensitivity. For these people, even small amounts of the wheat gluten can cause health problems. Exactly what changes the bishops will make regarding the Eucharistic wafer remain to be seen. Ideally, the new guidelines will permit wafers that are safe for people with celiac disease, and which will permit them to enjoy full communion. How do you feel about this? Is it welcome news? Do you know any catholics who’ve been missing out on communion? Stay tuned for more news on the new guidelines. Here, you’ll find a copy of the November 2014 USCCB General Assembly Agenda Item Vote Results.
  7. Celiac.com 01/25/2013 - Faced with calls to accommodate rising numbers of gluten-free parishioners, more Christian churches and are increasingly offering a gluten-free option for those rising numbers of gluten-free members who seek to take communion. A number of churches in the US and the UK have already taken measures to accommodate gluten-free members with gluten-free and low-gluten offerings. And while there is still a bit of wrangling in the Catholic church in the US about the acceptable gluten-content of communion wafers, it looks like more traditional Catholic and Anglican churches in Australia are now joining ranks in offering a gluten-free communion option for their parishioners. According to Mike Grieger, whose Australian Church Resources organization sells gluten-free and low-gluten altar bread to more than 2000 churches of different denominations, the trend is changing the way churches practice communion. Generally, for Protestants, offering gluten-free bread for communion seems to pose little, if any, religious difficulty, as the bread and the wine are regarded as mere symbols of the body and blood of Christ. Because Roman Catholics believe that the bread and wine, with the priest's blessing, actually become transformed into the savior's body and blood, the adoption of completely gluten-free offerings has caused issues. That is because church doctrine requires bread made from unleavened wheat, as they believe Jesus used at the Last Supper. To address the issue, nuns at the Benedictine Sisters of Perpetual Adoration in Clyde, Missouri have created an extremely low-gluten wafer that is now being offered by numerous Catholic churches. It appears that official policy in the Catholic church can differ across geographic regions. For example, the Catholic Diocese of Columbus recently said that gluten-free wafers don’t meet Vatican standards because they don’t contain wheat, but that parishioners can still receive full communion by taking the wine. However, in Australia, Father Ken Howell, Catholic Dean of St. Stephen's Cathedral in Brisbane, says that gluten-sensitive parishioners could now bring their own gluten-free wafers. Meanwhile, more Protestant churches are moving to accommodate not just gluten-sensitivity, but other dietary sensitivities as well. One example is Ashgrove West Uniting Church in Brisbane, which began to offer their congregation bread that gluten-free, nut-free, dairy-free and vegan friendly about a year and a half ago, according to church secretary Julie Hultgren. What to you think? Should churches accommodate their gluten-sensitive members with gluten-free communion options? Share your comments below. Meantime, stay tuned to hear the latest in gluten-free trends in communion.
  8. Ernesto Guifaldes, M.D. of the Pontificia Unicersidad Catolica de Chile has sent me much information, is particularly knowledgeable in this area. If you have any questions about this subject, please contact Ernesto at: eguirald@lascar.puc.cl The following is a letter dated March 10, 1996, and was sent to the Presidents of the Episcopal Conferences from the Vatican. It represents the official position of the Catholic Church with regard to gluten and the Eucharist. Your Eminence/Excellency: In recent years, this Dicastery has followed closely the development of the question of the use of low-gluten altar breads and mustum as matter for the celebration of the Eucharist. After careful study, conducted in collaboration with a number of concerned Episcopal Conferences, this Congregation in its ordinary session of June 22, 1994 has approved the following norms, which I am pleased to communicate: I. Concerning permission to use low-gluten altar breads: A. This may be granted by Ordinaries to priests and lay persons affected by celiac disease, after presentation of a medical certificate. Conditions for the validity of the matter: 1) Special hosts quibus glutinum ablatum est are invalid matter for the celebration of the Eucharist; 2) Low-gluten hosts are valid matter, provided that they contain the amount of gluten sufficient to obtain the confection of bread, that there is no addition of foreign materials, and that the procedure for making such hosts is not such as to alter the nature of the substance of the bread. II. Concerning permission to use mustum: A. The preferred solution continues to be Communion per intinctionem, or in concelebration under the species of bread alone. B. Nevertheless, the permission to use mustum can be granted by Ordinaries to priests affected by alcoholism or other conditions which prevent the ingestion of even the smallest quantity of alcohol, after the presentation of a medical certificate. C. By mustum is understood fresh juice from grapes, or juice preserved by suspending its fermentation (by means of freezing of other methods which do not alter its nature). D. In general, those who have received permission to use the mustum are prohibited from presiding at concelebrated Masses. There may be some exceptions however: in the case of a Bishop or Superior General; or, with prior approval of the Ordinary, at the celebration of the anniversary of priestly ordination or other similar occasions. In these cases, the one who presides is to communicate under both the species of bread and that of the mustum, while for the other concelebrants a chalice shall be provided in which normal wine is to be consecrated. E. In the very rare instances of lay persons requesting this permission, recourse must be made to the Holy See. III. Common Norms: A. The Ordinary must ascertain that the matter used conforms to the above requirements. B. Permissions are to be given only for as long as the situation continues which motivated the request. C. Scandal is to be avoided. D. Given the centrality of the celebration of the Eucharist in the life of the priest, candidates for the priesthood who are affected by celiac disease of suffer from alcoholism of similar conditions may not be admitted to Holy Orders. E. Since the doctrinal questions in this area have now been decided, disciplinary competence is entrusted to the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments. F. Concerned Episcopal Conferences shall report to the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments every two years regarding the application of these norms. With warm regards and best wishes, I am Sincerely yours in Christ. The leader of the fight for Celiacs in the Catholic Church has recently died. Archbishop Derek Worlock of Liverpool was diagnosed in the 1980s with celiac disease and presented a strong case in Rome for celiac sufferers to be allowed to receive special hosts at Communion, which was reluctantly granted. He died of lung cancer on February 8, 1996.
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