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Found 5 results

  1. Celiac.com 06/08/2015 - Many people with celiac disease take probiotic supplements to aid with digestion and improve gut health. However, a new study reveals that many popular probiotics actually contain traces of gluten, which is worrying for people who may have celiac disease or gluten intolerance. Researchers at the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University Medical Center used a detection technique called liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to analyze 22 popular, high-selling probiotics and measure gluten content. The team found that more than half of them (55%) contained gluten, including products labeled "gluten-free," according to research presented on May 16 at Digestive and Disease Week in Washington DC. For reasons doubtless including liability, the team did not list the names of the brands or products they tested. It is safe to assume that these would include major, easily accessible brands. These revelations may be unsurprising, given recent reports about gluten contamination in dietary supplements. So, if you have celiac disease or gluten intolerance, and take probiotic supplements, be sure to double-check your products; they may contain traces of gluten. Source: Time Magazine
  2. Very few celiacs are likely to have any reaction to topical gluten contact. In order for a gut reaction to occur, it is likely that direct contact with the gut lumen is required. Many people with celiac disease have everyday contact with gluten (for instance, bakers with celiac disease who have contact everyday with wheat flour), and do not have any reaction to it. However, there are, on rare occasion, people who have had an anaphylactoid response to gluten, and these people should avoid gluten in all forms. Also, topical gluten breathed into the upper airways may cause symptoms of allergic rhetinitis in rare instances. If there is a simple alternative to a shampoo, cosmetic, etc., you may want to use the non gluten containing product.
  3. Celiac.com 12/05/2014 - To remain healthy, people with serious gluten intolerance, especially people with celiac disease, must avoid foods containing gluten from wheat, barley, and rye. Accordingly, gluten detection is of high interest for the food safety of celiac patients. The FDA recently approved guidelines mandating that all products labeled as “gluten-free” contain less than 20ppm (20mg/kg) of gluten, but just how do products labeled as “gluten-free” actually measure up to this standard? Researchers H.J. Lee, Z. Anderson, and D. Ryu recently set outto assess the concentrations of gluten in foods labeled "gluten free" available in the United States. For their study, they collected seventy-eight samples of foods labeled “gluten-free,” and analyzed the samples using a gliadin competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. They then calculated gluten content based on the assumption of the same ratio between gliadin and glutenin, testing gluten levels down to 10ppm (10mg/kg). They found that forty-eight (61.5%) of the 78 samples labeled gluten-free contained less than 10ppm (10 mg/kg) gluten. Another 14 (17.9%) of the 78 samples contained less than 20ppm (20mg/kg) gluten, in accordance with the guidelines established by the Codex Alimentarius for gluten-free labeling. However, 16 samples, over 20%, contained gluten levels above 20 mg/kg, ranging from 20.3 to as high as 60.3 mg/kg. Breakfast cereal was the main culprit, with five of eight breakfast cereal samples showing gluten contents above 20ppm (20 mg/kg). The study does not name specific brands tested, nor do they indicate whether tested brands are themselves monitored by independent labs. Still, the results, while generally encouraging, show that more progress is needed to make sure that all products labeled as “gluten-free” meet the FDA guidelines. Until that time, it’s a matter of “caveat emptor,” or “buyer beware,” for consumers of gluten-free foods. Source: J Food Prot. 2014 Oct;77(10):1830-3. doi: 10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-14-149.
  4. This article originally appeared in the Autumn 2009 edition of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. Celiac.com 02/27/2015 - The answer to the "oats questions" are becoming clearer. The long-asked question is "Can people with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity safely eat oats?" Some people are so sensitive, that even the tiniest bit of gluten makes them feel unwell. So this answer is important because people on a gluten-free diet should not restrict foods unnecessarily. There are several aspects to this question: 1. Avenin: Oats do not naturally contain gluten ... but there is a similar protein called "avenin" found in oats that has the same properties as gluten (it is the "prolamine storage protein" of oat seeds, that helps protect the dormant seed and nourish it when it begins to grow).Fortunately, adverse reactions to this oat protein are rare. A study of 10 pertinent studies, with a total of 165 patients, found only 1 patient who had histological gut damage as a result of eating oats. This condition is now called "avenin-sensitive enteropathy" (ASE). This is documented by Garsed & Scott "Can oats be taken in a gluten-free diet? A systematic review" (Scand. J. Gastroenterol. 2007:42: 171–8. Clinical reports now provide strong evidence that oats very rarely cause damage to the gut mucosa in people with celiac disease. Subsequently, guidelines from many coeliac societies now reflect this new evidence. Moderate amounts of oats (half a cup of oats a day) can be consumed by most celiacs without risk of damaging intestinal villi. However, it is important to emphasise that these oats must be free of other contaminating gluten-cereals. What is not reported is whether some of these people experience symptoms (feel unwell) despite the healthy appearance of their gut under a microscope. These people might have an "avenin-sensitivity" similar to gluten-sensitivity without any accompanying gut damage. This question has not yet been investigated. Cross-contamination: The reason that many people apparently react to oats is not because of the avenin, but to inadvertent gluten contamination. In other words, wheat and other gluten-grains accidentally get into the oats.Traces of gluten are commonly found in packets of oats–this is from the cross-contamination of oats with other gluten-grains. This contamination can occur during any stage of the life-cycle of oat production: the planting, the harvesting, the transportation, the processing and the refining of oats. It is almost impossible to avoid such cross-contamination unless all this machinery is exclusively devoted to oats production. This requires large-scale production as is seen in the USA. One research group analyzed a total of 134 oats samples, comprising grains and commercial oat products collected from Europe, the United States and Canada. This study confirmed that most oats were contaminated with mixtures of wheat, barley and rye (Hernando et al. "Measurement of wheat gluten and barley hordeins in contaminated oats from Europe, the United States and Canada by Sandwich R5 ELISA". Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2008 Jun;20:545-54.) Level of gluten sensitivity: How intensely people react to gluten varies. Some people can eat moderate amounts of gluten and have no symptoms at all. Whilst many are so sensitive that even the tiniest amount upsets them. Thus, minimal cross-contamination of oats with gluten is a problem for a significant proportion of the gluten-sensitive community.It may be that people who have extreme gluten sensitivity are more likely to react to avenin. It is my observation that super-sensitive gluten reactors seldom tolerate oats. However, this subject has not been researched. Asymptomatic gluten damage: Oddly, some people can have the gut damage of celiac disease without experiencing noticeable symptoms. They have severe gut damage but are completely unaware of it. Such a diagnosis is usually discovered by screening blood test. As these people do not get any symptoms from gluten, they would not know if oats are upsetting them either! These asymptomatic celiacs need to be followed up with regular blood tests (and perhaps subsequent biopsy) to ensure that they are healing. Why bother with oats?The ability to use oats in your diet gives an important source of fibre as well as other important nutrients. They have a low glycemic index (GI) which makes them satisfying to eat. Also, eating oats will contribute to lower cholesterol levels. And of course, it gives you a valuable additional food to make the topping on apple-crumble, hot oat porridge on a cold morning, and a crunchy, tasty muesli. Some companies certify their oats to be gluten-free, which means they are free from any cross-contamination. If you are very sensitive to gluten, then you might not tolerate oats. The best thing to do is try a little and see. Do blood tests: "Get a blood test!" is my mantra. So many people go gluten-free without a blood test. So many people with celiac disease never get follow-up blood tests. It is important to get a firm diagnosis of celiac disease / gluten sensitivity. Then to get more tests a year or two later to make sure that your body is healing. One way to check out how you are tolerating oats in your body is to get regular blood test checks for gluten (IgG-gliadin) and for tissue damage (DGP/tTG)–for more details please visit me at my website.
  5. Celiac.com 05/06/2015 - Gluten is a common ingredient in many commercial food products. Less commonly known, however, is that many manufacturers use gluten as an inert ingredient in such products as medications, supplements, and vitamins. For people with celiac disease, exposure to as little as 30 to 50 mg of gluten per day can damage the mucosa of the small intestine. So, it is important to know the gluten content of prescription and nonprescription medications, even though a lack of labeling laws can make it challenging to find products that are gluten-free. Given the lack of resources to verify the gluten content of prescription and non-prescription medications, it is best to check with the manufacturer. Your pharmacist can help make the process a bit simpler than doing it yourself. There are three things you and/or your pharmacist can do to determine the gluten status of any prescription drug. First is the use of a package insert (PI). You or your pharmacist can use the PI to review drug formulations, and find contact information for pharmaceutical manufacturers. Gluten is used in numerous medications, supplements, and vitamins, often as an inert ingredient known as an excipient. For prescription medications, the PI should include a detailed listing of excipients; however, if this information is not readily available, the FDA provides drug labeling information for prescription and some OTC medications at DailyMed (dailymed.nlm.nih.gov). For non-prescription products, there often is nothing in the PI regarding gluten content, which means you will likely need to check with the manufacturer to be sure. Second, you or your pharmacist can visit company websites to help determine whether a medication potentially contains gluten. Third, you can find manufacturer contact information on the product or its packaging, by conducting an Internet search using the manufacturer's name, or by accessing online drug-information resources such as Clinical Pharmacology, Facts & Comparisons, and Martindale. When requesting information from a manufacturer, it is helpful to provide the lot number. Recent research by Mangione and colleagues showed that information about the gluten content of non-prescription products is usually available and easy to access through the manufacturer. Fourth, there are some third-party websites, such as GlutenFreeDrugs.com, which is maintained by a clinical pharmacist, contains a detailed chart listing selected brand and generic medications that are gluten-free, as well as those free of lactose or soy. However, this is not a comprehensive or definitive list of products, as ingredients and formulations can change from lot to lot in the manufacturing process. Lastly, Celiac.org, the Celiac Disease Foundation offers a variety of resources and provides information on the treatment of celiac disease, tips on living gluten-free, and support-group contact information. Source: US Pharmacist. 2014;39(12):44-48.
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