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Found 23 results

  1. Celiac.com 12/14/2018 - As the popularity of gluten- and allergen-free foods have exploded, so has the list of manufacturers rushing new products to market. Several studies have shown that numerous restaurant and commercial foods labeled as ‘gluten-free’ contain unacceptable gluten levels. Meanwhile, other news has revealed that many supermarket products labeled gluten-free in fact contain unacceptable levels of wheat. Now, news in from the UK says that manufacturers were forced to recall sixty-eight products linked to potentially lethal allergies or food intolerances due to being improper labeling. There have been several cases of accidental exposure to allergens causing death. Partly as a result, a renewed diligence among grocers and manufacturers has led to a number of product recalls. Recalled products include yogurt, salad dressing, supermarket croissants, biscuits and cottage pies. The figures suggest that companies may have supply, formulation, and/or manufacturing issues that leave them out of touch with the ingredients in their products. Recent major product recalls in the UK include: Sainsbury's in-store bakery All Butter Croissant recalled over undeclared almonds. Quorn’s recall packs of Gluten Free Burgers due to undeclared gluten. M&S’s recall of Gluten Free Scotch Eggs due to undeclared gluten. Mary Berry's Salad Dressing’s recall due to undeclared egg. Tesco’s recall of Hearty Food Company Cottage Pie and Hearty Food Company Sausage and Mash due to undeclared milk. Tim Lang, professor of food policy at City, University of London, said: "The recent deaths ought to be a wake-up call. Labeling is not working and confidence is falling. This is not a good state of affairs." The Food & Drink Federation (FDF), which speaks for manufacturers, said that, under UK regulations, “If a pre-packed food or drink product contains any of the 14 food allergens it must be declared and emphasized within the ingredients list.” The FDF advises that "In the unlikely event that once a product has shipped, a business discovers that this labeling has not been done correctly, it is their responsibility to inform the Food Standards Agency and immediately recall the product." The British Retail Consortium, which speaks for the major chains, said: "Supermarkets are fully aware of how crucial allergen labeling is. That's why in the small number of cases where an ingredient is not correctly labeled, retailers withdraw the product and notify the FSA." With numerous studies, products recalls, and news stories calling attention to the problem of gluten contamination in gluten-free food, look for retailers and manufacturers to take a more aggressive role in policing their labels, if only to escape the action of regulators and litigators.
  2. We're a household of one Celiac and the rest non-gluten free, and we have certain dishes, containers, utensils, etc, that are used exclusively for gluten free eating, and other things (such as glassware, ceramic, etc) that we use for both. We're looking at buying an Instant Pot, which has a brushed stainless steel cooking pot. We understand that stainless steel cookware is safe to share between gluten and gluten-free foods (as long as it's washed really well after use), but does anyone know if brushed stainless steel poses any kind of contamination issue? Thanks!
  3. Celiac.com 12/06/2018 - The growing popularity of gluten-free foods has led to numerous new products for consumers, but it has also led to some problems. One recent study showed that up to one-third of foods sold as gluten-free contain gluten above 20ppm allowed by federal law. Other studies have shown that restaurant food labeled as “gluten-free” is often contaminated with gluten. The problem of gluten in commercial food labeled gluten-free is not isolated to the United States. Recent studies abroad show that the problem exists in nearly every gluten-free market in every country. In Australia, for example, researchers from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute in Melbourne found detectable gluten in almost 3% of 256 commonly purchased “gluten-free” manufactured foods, a study published in the Medical Journal of Australia on Monday says. Furthermore, the study shows that nearly 10% of restaurant dishes sold as "gluten-free" contain unacceptable levels of gluten. Now, the Australians have a stricter standard than nearly anyone else, so look for them to be on top of potential problems with gluten contamination in gluten-free products. The study did not name the food manufacturers responsible for the contaminated products, but did note that better, more frequent gluten testing by manufacturers would make gluten-free foods safer for people with celiac disease. In a related study, the same researchers found in May that nearly one in ten samples of “gluten-free” dishes from restaurants within the City of Melbourne contained gluten levels in excess of the official Food Standards Australia New Zealand definition of gluten-free. “It’s troubling to think that these foods could be hindering the careful efforts of patients trying their best to avoid gluten,” an author of the study, Dr Jason Tye-Din, said. A spokeswoman from Coeliac Australia said the organization was taking the findings seriously. “The research team that conducted this study has liaised with the food companies and is following up the positive samples with further retesting to ensure the issue is resolved,” she said. In addition to urging consumers to be diligent in reading labels, and to report any suspect products, “Coeliac Australia advises all people with coeliac disease to have regular medical check-ups as they do have a serious autoimmune condition and medical assessment is important to determine that their gluten-free diet is going well and no complications are developing.” Read more at: TheGuardian.com
  4. Celiac.com 10/15/2018 - If you’re on a gluten-free diet for medical reasons, then you’re probably already cautious about eating out. A new study tells us exactly why people with celiac disease and other gluten-sensitive conditions have reason to be very careful about eating out. According to the latest research, one in three foods sold as "gluten-free" in U.S. restaurants actually contain trace levels of gluten. This is partly due to the fact that the gluten-free diet has become popular with many non-celiacs and others who have no medical need for the diet. That has led many restaurants to offer gluten-free foods to their customers, says study author Dr. Benjamin Lebwohl, of Columbia University's Celiac Disease Center. But, if this research is any indication, too many restaurants don’t do a good job with gluten-free. For the study, more than 800 investigators set out to assess the true gluten content of dishes listed as "gluten-free" on menus. Armed with portable gluten sensors, they tested for gluten levels that met or exceeded 20 parts per million, the standard cutoff for any gluten-free claim. Based on more than 5,600 gluten tests over 18 months, the investigators determined that 27 percent of gluten-free breakfast meals actually contained gluten. At dinner time, this figure hit 34 percent. The rise could reflect a steady increase in gluten contamination risk as the day unfolds, the researchers said. Off course, the risk is not all equal. Some restaurants are riskier than others. Unsurprisingly, the biggest culprit seems to be restaurants that offer gluten-free pastas and pizzas. Nearly half of the pizza and pasta dishes from those establishments contained gluten, according to the study. Why is that? Well, as most folks with celiac disease know all too well, kitchens aren’t really set up to segregate gluten, and "sharing an oven with gluten-containing pizza is a prime setting for cross-contamination," says Lebwohl. Also, too many restaurants use the same water to cook gluten-free pasta as they do for regular pasta, which contaminates the gluten-free pasta and defeats the purpose. Moreover, although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulates gluten-free labels on packaged food products, there is currently no federal oversight of gluten-free claims in restaurants. The results of the study will be presented today at a meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology, in Philadelphia. Research presented at meetings is usually considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal. In the absence of federal enforcement at the restaurant level, the burden for making sure food is gluten-free falls to the person doing the ordering. So, gluten-free eaters beware! These results are probably not surprising to many of you. Do you have celiac disease? Do you eat in restaurants? Do you avoid restaurants? Do you have special tactics? Feel free to share your thoughts below. Read more at UPI.com
  5. Jocelyne

    Sex

    I’ve recently started being more active with my dating life and gave my partners the talk about being careful when they kiss me but I was wondering if you can be contaminated with oral sex at all
  6. Celiac.com 12/21/2017 - After a lot of trial and error we celiacs learn, often the hard way, to eliminate foods that are poisonous to our bodies. Sadly, we often forget about what "goes onto" our skin. Since the skin is the living outer layer of our bodies it absorbs not only water and oils, it also absorbs cosmetics that can be poisonous to our celiac bodies, most specifically those of us afflicted with dermatitis herpetiformis (often called celiac disease of the Skin). Men, before you set this article aside, thinking it's only for women and you are exempt, please read on. One of 133 Americans has a wheat-related allergy according to CNN.com. We have a tendency not to group toothpaste and lip-glosses with cosmetics, and we usually ignore vitamins and medications when researching celiac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis. We forget to ask our hairdresser what products they are using and whether they contain wheat or gluten, and glibly apply night creams (to absorb into our skin as we sleep) and mud packs that promise similar benefits. Inquiring into the gluten content of cosmetics, I contacted more than twenty leading companies, then I waited. I was discouraged, particularly by the blatant rudeness of some of the responses I received. Meanwhile, I had to learn whether gluten could be absorbed through the skin. Some websites answered that question with a direct "no". Even some physicians responded saying "no". However, since the skin is the largest living organ in the body and it does absorb various oils and emollients, listing gluten-containing components of medicinal and non-medicinal ingredients allows consumers with celiac disease (celiac disease) or wheat allergies to make informed choices when purchasing and/or consuming natural health products. It enables them to avoid gluten in quantities that may trigger adverse reactions. There are numerous articles on dermatitis herpetiformis and celiac disease making claims so contradictory that it is no wonder we are confused. And I'm not talking about accidental ingestion of gluten. Some such articles claim that trace amounts of gluten One article insists that the skin is not going to absorb gluten, even though our skin is a living organism that can absorb suntan lotions, trans-dermal drugs, etc. It is so susceptible to absorption that when you place a slice of onion in your sock you will taste it in your mouth the following day. How can these websites make such contrary claims? The skin absorbs flavors as well as creams containing gluten. On the other hand, "Glutino" had an article on record, written on September 14, 2010, regarding "Hidden Gluten in Health and Beauty Products". It states that if you apply hand lotion that contains gluten and then prepare food you are exposing yourself to accidental ingestion and your food to cross contamination. They suggest a site called: naturallydahling.com, a site that lists gluten-containing ingredients commonly used in cosmetics. Research proving the full extent of how much your skin absorbs is still unavailable, but to those who believe that "what goes on, goes in", the cosmetic industry is full of unknowns. The size of gluten molecules suggests that they may not be able to pass through the skin, but chemicals and technology designed to enhance skin absorption are already present, if not prevalent, in the cosmetic industry. These chemicals are potentially dangerous and often go untested for negative health effects, yet are widespread in lotions, antiperspirants, perfumes and the "Great Mother Market" anti-wrinkle cosmetics. Since the cosmetic industry is self-regulated it is more important than ever to carefully read labels and use natural or organic products whenever possible. If you find yourself reacting to a particular cosmetic, it is possible that you may have an increased sensitivity to gluten, an allergy or even dermatitis herpetiformis. But wait a minute! Aren't we told that gluten cannot pass through the skin? I suffered terribly from the use of an "Anti-Frizz" product for my hair that caused a massive outbreak of dermatitis herpetiformis. I should have read the label all the way down to the end. I would have found, in very small print, "wheat germ oil". When researching for this article, I wrote to the company and mentioned my problems with their product. I received an apology and a sample of their "new and improved" "Frizz-Ease" product. They obviously do not know their own products and the fancy names they use are as confusing to them as they are to me. The "new and improved" product contained Avena Sativa, the Latin name for OAT. I was also told that I likely just had "hives" on the back of my scalp, as oats are still somewhat controversial. Some research suggests that oats in themselves are gluten free, but that they are virtually always contaminated with other grains during cultivation, harvest, distribution or processing. Recent research indicates that a protein naturally found in oats (avenin) contains peptide sequences closely resembling some peptides from wheat gluten. The oat peptides caused mucosal inflammation in significant numbers of celiac disease sufferers. Some examination results show that even oats that are not contaminated with wheat particles may be dangerous. Again, I was told not to introduce oats into my diet, or use oatmeal as a facial mask until I had been free of a dermatitis herpetaformis outbreak for at least a year. Thus far I have not been able to get relief for that long. It seems the celiac or those who suffer from dermatitis herpetiformis {and let's face it, most people suffering from dermatitis herpetaformis have celiac disease} have to apply the rule of "caveat emptor" - Let the buyer beware. Tolerance to gluten varies among individuals with celiac disease and there are limited clinical scientific data on a threshold for the amount of gluten required to initiate or maintain an immunological reaction in celiac disease patients. "Therefore there is no clear consensus on a safe gluten threshold level." The Dermatologist I see at The University of British Columbia Hospital has told me to tell people in restaurants that gluten is poison to my system and I can become very ill from ingesting gluten. They are a little more careful before telling me a dish is gluten free, and hopefully through education the cosmetic industry is going to improve its testing and cease glibly stating things as "fact" when they simply do not know. Industries that produce over-the-counter medications and vitamin supplement, especially those that may contain gluten as a binding agent, should also be scrutinized. We have come a long way, but large challenges are still ahead. One of our biggest challenges is reading the labels on these products. One almost needs to carry a magnifying glass when shopping. Cosmetics, which include hair products, soaps, perfumes and toothpastes also run us into problems, often big, "itchy" problems. The male celiac/dermatitis herpetaformis experience can also include outbreaks from any product that comes into contact with the skin and particularly those that "stay" on the hair or skin. Who would have known that sun tan lotions could contain wheat germ oil? It is difficult enough to eliminate words such as "triticum vulgare" the Latin name of wheat or "wheat germ" containing ingredients! In preparation for this article, I contacted the following companies: Avon, Clairol, Clarins, Clinique, Coty, Covergirl, Estee Lauder, Garnier, John Frieda, John Paul Mitchell, L'Oreal, Mabelline, Marcelle, Neutrogena, Olay, Pantene, Revlon, and companies that go under general all-encompassing headings such as "Life Brand". This can be a daunting task, and "gluten free" and "wheat free" are not the same thing. Some of the things that I learned in this rather massive undertaking include the rule of "Pac Man". Companies are sometimes taken over by bigger companies and when this occurs their rules change. A company that at one time did not test on animals or use machines that were cleaned prior to using products claiming to be gluten free are now glibly adopting the "new bigger and better". I was shocked to find out that some of the containers from the smaller company were still being used after these PAC MAN take-overs, to save on manufacturing costs. And, remember, once several ingredients are combined the "organic" ingredient probably ceases to be "organic". Some women (and men, you are not exempt here) expect to pay a higher price for a luxury brand assuming that the gorgeous bottle of eye cream sold at Saks for $60.00 is going to work better than the $1.99 tube on the clearance rack of a local store. Just ensure the product has not reached its "sell by" date because it may all be psychological. What you have to concern yourself about, as a celiac patient or a person with dermatitis herpetiformis, is whether there is gluten or wheat in that product. Before you splurge on an expensive product take the time to compare it to a similar product from one of their sister brands. Usually an online store (like Drugstore.com) will list the ingredients. Or you can check on a site like "Makeup Alley" which is a great resource, offering numerous reviews and you can ask questions of the extremely knowledgeable posters on this message board. Another great resource is a large paperback book, titled "Do not go to the Drugstore Without Me" written by Paula Begoin. When I purchased the books in 2001 it was in its 5th Edition. NB: This is not a book specifically for celiac disease or dermatitis herpetiformis, but it was in this book that I found out about "Glutamic Acid". It is derived from wheat gluten and is an amino acid that can have water binding properties for the skin. It also explains glycerylesters that form a vast group of ingredients that are a mixture of fatty acids, sugars, and non-volatile alcohols. These fats and oils are used in cosmetics as emollients and lubricants as well as binding and thickening agents. At the back of this book is a list of the companies that do not test on animals and those that do, but again, the PAC MAN Rule applies. I purchased the book for myself, my daughter, and daughter-in-law, specifically because when my daughter was in her twenties she seemed to think she simply must buy her shampoo from the hairdresser because only $45.00 shampoo was good enough for her hair. It was a big eye opener when she moved out of home and had to purchase it herself! I believe that the more we know about beauty products and the beauty industry the wiser our purchases will be. Consider, for instance, the cost of research and development for say, L'Oreal who develop formulas that can be used in Garnier Shampoos ($3.99) and Kerastase shampoo ($29.99) It doesn't take long to realize that it is a good idea to compare products at different ends of the price scale. Sometimes, two products from two different brands will have the same patent number. The difference is in the non-active ingredients, which give it a unique texture, scent and/or color. Also, it is wise to photo-copy, and even apply plastic covering to lists of "safe" beauty products, just as it is wise to keep a copy of "safe" and "unsafe" foods on hand when you go shopping. When you cannot even pronounce some of the words used in foods and beauty products how can you be expected to remember what is safe to apply to your hair and skin? I received a very nice letter from Teresa Menna, Manager at L'Oreal in Quebec who told me that L'Oreal has abolished gluten in the composition of L'Oreal products. However, on reading more literature I find that Garnier is a mass market cosmetic brand of L'Oreal, and L'Oreal is part of the Group P&G. P&G stands for Proctor and Gamble and P&G Beauty brands can be found on the site:_ http://pgbeautygroomingscience.com/product.php {The Company Garnier Laboratories was started in 1906 and acquired by L'Oreal in the 1970's}. I was unaware prior to researching this article that L'Oreal owned Kerastase, or that L'Oreal had purchased the MAC Cosmetic line, or that the KAO Brands Company owns Ban, Biore, Jergens and John Frieda. Here are some of the ingredients you might find in cosmetics that could indicate wheat or gluten: Avena Sativa {Latin name of oat, or "oat" term containing ingredients Hordeum distichon {Latin name of barley, or "barley" term containing ingredients} Hydrolyzed malt extract Hydrolyzed wheat protein Hydrolyzed vegetable protein Wheat germ Vitamin E Cyclodextrin Barley extract Fermented grain extract Oat (Avena sativa) Samino peptide complex Secale Cereale (Latin name of rye, or "rye" term containing ingredients) Stearyldimoniumhydroxypropyl Phytosphingosine extract Triticum vulgare {Latin name of wheat, or "wheat" term containing ingredients} Dextrin Dextrin palmitate Maltodextrin Sodium C8-16 Isoalkylsuccinyl Wheat Protein Sulfonate Yeast extract Anything with wheat in the name Thoughts: Some cute person gave the warning to ensure your lipstick is gluten free even if you don't have any skin issues. You could swallow some lipstick and get gluten in your system! Another person adds at the bottom of their e-mail to be sure to check guidelines regularly because company policies can change yearly and the list is only to be considered as "guidelines" and make-up ingredients can change each time a company changes or the scientists within that company decide to add to or delete certain products. {Makes you feel very safe as a celiac/dermatitis herpetaformis person doesn't it?} Another e-mailer suggested that mascara labeled as a "thickening agent" should be fearfully evaluated by the celiac/dermatitis herpetaformis person because the thickening agent is often "flour" and can sometimes cause eyelashes to fall out! Who knew? Noted on one e-mail, ‘So-called luxury brands can be laden with synthetic ingredients that do not cost more than their not so luxurious counterparts. True natural products that do perform, and there are a few such brands on the market, are authentic natural products that actually deliver what they promise and they truly do cost more to make because raw ingredients are much higher in cost. In fact, the cost is significantly higher when pure high grade ingredients are used. Letter received: " We have compiled a list of gluten free beauty products available on sephora.com. These products do not contain any wheat, rye or barley derivatives, and they were made in gluten-free laboratories so there is no chance of cross-contamination. But since you cannot be too careful, discontinue use of any product that triggers an attack." Letter received from Clairol:- "Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye and barley. Although it is not added directly to our product, it may be present in fragrances. Due to the difficulty of tracing the source ingredients for the variety of fragrances used in manufacturing our products, we cannot provide specific levels of gluten content for any of our fragrance blends. Be aware that even products labeled "unscented" will still contain masking scent, therefore they may potentially contain gluten." Advertisement: World's Top Ten Cosmetic Companies : "Beauty begins on the inside, check out our post on ‘The Top Five Foods for Amazing Skin'" - Posted by The Greenster Team "I finally got up the nerve to go through my own (their) personal care products and look them up on "SKIN DEEP" and was very disappointed. The Company that makes my mascara (L'Oreal) tests on animals as does the company that makes my eyeliner (Covergirl) and my under eye concealer (Made by Physician's Formula) contains parabens" THE GREENSTER TEAM creates great articles, list the top ten cosmetic companies, what portion of the world's market they share and their hazard range. Letter received from Mabelline:- "Please find below most ingredients containing gluten (wheat and other grains). We invite you to take this list and compare it to our ingredient listings every time you buy a new product. When in doubt, do not hesitate to do your own research or contact your doctor." {Caveat Emptor} REMEMBER:- The truth is that there is no such thing as gluten free. The FDA has proposed a less than 20 ppm gluten -free standard in 2006. That was its first attempt to define the term gluten free, but the agency has yet to finalize it. The USDA is awaiting the FDA's decision before moving ahead. STILL WAITING. With the number of products making unregulated gluten free claims on the rise, the marketplace can be scary for consumers with gluten sensitivity and wheat allergies. Why hasn't the FDA finalized its 2006 definition of gluten free? As part of sweeping legislation known s FALCPA the Food Allergen Labelling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004, Congress ordered the FDA to define and permit the voluntary use of the term gluten free on the labeling of foods by August 2008. As directed, the FDA issued proposed gluten-free regulations on schedule but seems to have failed to follow through with a final ruling. There has been no explanation for the delay. Since the Cosmetic Industry is a self-regulating body it seems {appears, is assumed} that we the consumers are on our own as far as researching what goes on our skin and in our hair, because some of the letters I have received leave it to the celiac or dermatitis herpetiformis sufferer to research their own products. Even a letter from Avon states:- "Although Avon sells quality products, there is always possibility of contamination during manufacturing or changes/substitutions of ingredients. As with everything related to celiac disease, dermatitis herpetiformis and gluten Intolerance, products, ingredients and preparation may change over time. Your reactions to a specific product, ingredient may be different from the reactions of others. Like eating at a restaurant, you have to make a choice whether to consume/use a product. The list is meant to be a "guide" and does not guarantee that a product is 100% free of gluten. Dacia Lehman, Avon and GIG assume no responsibility for its use and any resulting liability or consequential damages is denied." LETTER: - Proctor and Gamble "The WHMIS rating is designed to rate raw materials and not formulated products such as ours. Nor are our consumer products required to be labeled under the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Hazard Communication Standard. Thus labelling of our products with WHMIS ratings or any other hazard rating should not be required by any state health and safety regulatory agencies." That letter is signed by Asela for the Pantene Team. LETTER:- May 2, 2012 - xyz@ca.loreal.com - "We have received your message and we will get back to you as soon as possible. Web Sites: Gluten-free Lifestyle: glutenfree-lifestyle.com (Gives gluten free products by type and by company) i.e.: deodorants, face & body wash, make-up, suntan lotion, toothpaste, moisturizer, lotion, shampoo & conditioner, shave cream, gels, after shave, laundry products, cleaners, soap, etc. Beauty Industry: Who Owns What? Glutino - Hidden Gluten in Health Products - Glutino & Gluten Free Pantry Blogs: www.gluten-free-cosmetic-counter.org Beauty Blogging Junkie Ebates Shopping Blog In The Makeup Lipstick Powder n'Paint Shop With a Vengeance Smarter Beauty Blog The Beauty Brains Sephora Sephora's iGoogle Beauty Portal References: Codex Standard for Foods for Special Dietary Use for Persons Intolerant to Gluten. Codex STAN 118 - 1979 ROME Government of Canada 2008 - Regulations Amending the Food and Drug Regulations (1220- Enhanced Labeling for Food Allergen and Gluten Sources and Added Sulphites) Health Canada 2007 - celiac disease and the Safety of Oats Labeling of Natural Health Products Containing Gluten - Health Canada Notice 2010
  7. I am posting this on behalf of my wife who has had Celiac for several years now (or rather, more likely non-celiac gluten sensitivity). She has gotten very, very good at not getting contaminated, as she is EXTREMELY sensitive to gluten. However, when she DOES get contaminated, she suffers from terrible acid reflux and GERD for 6-7 weeks post-contamination. I have a couple questions. First, does anyone else here experience this length of symptoms post-contamination? Second, does anyone have any recommendations of anything she can try to reduce the gerd/reflux during her 6-7 week recovery period (we have tried DGL and a few other things, and nothing seems to do a whole lot of good). Any help/advice appreciated. Noel
  8. I recently had an attack - something I ate was apparently contaminated with gluten. I went through a period of difficulty eating, pain, and weight loss over a month. But that's not the issue, that's celiac for you. I'm bipolar, and it seems my medications (like my nutrients) didn't absorb as they should. So I went through of month of deep depression, where I could barely move and barely take care of myself. My doctors have no solutions. I'm scared - I can't take a month out of my life because a mistake was made. I am so so so careful. I've searched online but I just come up with warnings on gluten in pills. My situation is just miserable. What would you do if you were reliant on a medication to live? I'm not even asking what to do; there's obviously no solution. Just if anyone has this problem, and how they get by without being afraid of everything they eat. I guess I'm just curious who else worries about this.
  9. I've been eating gluten free for just over a year now after being diagnosed with celiac disease and T1 diabetes. I had just started to feel "normal" right around the 1 year mark, meaning I felt little to no pain and my stool didn't seem too out of the ordinary. Yay, finally some healing! However, the past few days I've started to feel that pain after eating, and I don't know if this is because I recently ate something contaminated and my body is healing from, or if something I'm eating is too hard to digest, or if I'm still just healing from the damage done 1 year ago!! It seems like there are so many factors when it comes to keeping gluten out of my food in my shared household (did I wash my hands? what if my soap has gluten in it? was the plate/utensil clean and not contaminated? did one of my family members accidentally put their glutened hand in my bag of chips?) and even then, what if the issue is within the food I'm eating itself? I find myself almost paranoid and feeling like no matter how many times the food package says "gluten free", my stomach is going to hurt from eating it. Does anyone else feel this way? I feel like it might be I'm eating too many processed things made with food that's hard to digest, but I don't want to limit my diet any further, though I will cut back. I was just so hopeful during those couple of weeks I was having no symptoms that I was actually finally healing!! But now I'm back to the pain. It's been putting me down pretty hard and I've been neglecting my blood sugars and insulin because of it, so that's not helping. Does anyone have any suggestions to how I can figure out what I'm eating that's hurting me? Should I catalog everything I eat and record my reactions to it? Will this pain just go away in time and this is a part of healing from mini-glutenings I get from accidental contamination? Thank you for your help. I definitely feel a LOT better than I did when I was eating gluten, but it's so frustrating to still be in pain after eating gluten free for what feels like a long time.
  10. Celiac.com 02/02/2017 - Scientists have devised a universal gluten cross-contamination checklist they hope will help to reduce gluten contamination in the food services industries. The newly created food services checklist was compiled after an extensive literature review, input from 11 different experts with PhDs and experience with food services and/or gluten and celiac issues, along with documents from various organizations such as the Gluten-Free Certification Program from the Canadian Celiac Association. The final checklist consists of 88 items divided into 12 sections, which cover everything from building and facilities maintenance, cleaning and ventilation, to employee clothing and hygiene, to food production and transport. The checklist also includes a robust section on planning and communication with an eye toward maintaining a gluten-free facility and supporting gluten-free customers. The tool is notable in that it is the first comprehensive checklist designed to promote a proper understanding of the issues across all manufacturing and food production processes. All of which make it, "an interesting tool since it helps to assure proper understanding of the items, which is crucial for the correct evaluation of conformities/non-conformities situations in loco and ultimately might impact the safety of the food produced in certain establishments," according to the authors. Such an understanding is crucial for making correct on-site assessments of conformities/non-conformities. Properly employed, the checklist might impact, and ultimately improve the safety of gluten-free food across the entire industry. Read more at: mdpi.com and cantechletter.com
  11. Celiac.com 08/03/2016 - As part of its mission, Gluten Free Watchdog performs gluten testing on gluten-free products and shares that information with the gluten-free community. They've tested many gluten-free products over the years, and collected data from their efforts. Over the past five years, Gluten Free Watchdog has been testing oat products labeled gluten-free that list oats as the first or second ingredient. In all, they've done professional testing on thirty-five different commercial products. They've recently released their findings, and while they don't name any names, they do offer some good general insight into gluten-contamination levels in general. All testing for Gluten Free Watchdog was conducted by Bia Diagnostics, LLC using the sandwich R5 ELISA (Ridascreen Gliadin R7001) and cocktail extraction—Mendez method. Based on testing data from Gluten Free Watchdog, oat products labeled gluten-free have an almost three times higher risk of gluten contamination as compared to labeled gluten-free foods as a whole. The results showed 28 of 35 or 80% of oat products testing below 5 parts per million of gluten, and 2 of 35 or 6% of oat products testing at or above 5 ppm but below 20 ppm of gluten. Meanwhile, 5 of 35 or 14% of oat products tested at or above 20 ppm of gluten. The good news, of course, is that 86% percent oat products tested below 20 parts per million of gluten, but that's not nearly as good as the 95% of all gluten-free foods tested to date that have tested below 20 ppm of gluten. So, the bad news is that the 14% of oat products testing at or above 20 ppm of gluten is nearly three times higher than for gluten-free foods in general. Main culprits testing at or above 20 ppm of gluten included "gluten-free" labeled oat breadcrumbs, rolled oats, granola, hot oat cereal, and granola. Gluten Free Watchdog's main recommendation for consumers is to know the source of the oats you are eating, and to make sure you're getting your oats form a safe and trustworthy source. If you have a concern, check with the manufacturer to make sure they source ALL oats from a supplier of purity protocol oats, such as gluten-free Harvest, Avena, Montana Gluten-Free. Read more at Gluten-free Watchdog.org.
  12. I am diagnosed Celiac and am really new to the gluten-free diet. I am confused about cross-contamination. I wanted to get opinions on Edy’s/Dryer’s ice cream (They are the same brand. They just have different names depending on where you live). I emailed Edy’s/Dryer’s and asked about gluten. They said that it’s usually only the obvious flavors that contain gluten, but sometimes it can be in other ingredients. They use shared lines and make no claims about how well they might clean them between flavors (if they do). They emailed me a list of flavors and indicated only two they felt they could claim are gluten-free: slow churned french silk and slow churned neopolatin. I do not care for those flavors. The obvious ones with gluten (cookies, etc.) had a definite for containing gluten. The majority of the flavors on the list were listed as TBD: “We currently cannot make any claims about gluten-free for this product.” The flavors I am interested in eating are the cup size version of slow churned mint chocolate chip and the cup size version of grand peanut butter cup. I did not see any ingredients in those two that looked like they might contain gluten. Would you eat the products or would you be worried about cross-contamination? I don’t know how picky I need to be about cross-contamination. Thank you.
  13. My gluten problem is on the extreme side, so much that I wince at shaking a stranger's hand or using a public pen. I'm just curious if anyone has had issues with walking past the Bakery corner while shopping for groceries. One of my stores has all the fruit and veggies right next to the bakery, so I have to rinse the food 'just in case'. Some days I think just smelling the cookies and donuts gets my symptoms flaring. I've learned to shop after they close the kitchen down but some days I have to go before 5pm and that is when I seem to be randomly glutened. If anyone else out there feels like a constant victim, you are not alone. I wish it was as easy as reading labels for me but hugging my friends can get me sick When I go out in public I touch nothing unless I have to buy it, and then when I get home I change clothes. We all have to be extra careful so I just want to send a virtual hug to everyone, especially if they are feeling like their house is the only safe place left.
  14. I got sick yesterday at work. There was a potluck for my coworker's birthday. I ate my own food, all things I've had before, and avoided all potluck items. The triscuts and wheat thins were placed right next to my desk however. Is it possible I somehow got contaminated from the crackers? By the end of the day I bloated, developed heart burn, abdominal pain, and mood swings.
  15. Thompson T. NEJM. 2004;351:2021-2022 (Nov. 4, 2004, Number 19) Celiac.com 11/09/2004 - While oats do not appear to naturally contain gluten, like other grains they can become contaminated during harvesting, transporting, milling and processing. Many studies have shown that moderate amounts of uncontaminated oats are safe for most adults with celiac disease. There may, however, also exist a sub-set of celiacs who also have avenin-reactive mucosal T-cells, avenin being the oat counterpart to wheats gliadin. To summarize the study—12 containers of oats representing 4 different lots of 3 brands (Quaker, Country Choice, and McCanns) were tested for gluten contamination using the R5 ELISA developed by Mendez. Contamination levels ranged from below the limit of detection (3 ppm gluten) to 1807 ppm gluten. Three of the 12 oat samples contained gluten levels of less than 20 ppm, and the other nine had levels that ranged from 23 to 1,807 ppm. All brands of oats tested had at least 1 container of oats that tested above 200 ppm gluten. It is interesting to note that Country Choice oats ranged from below the limit of detection to 210 ppm—an amount that is nearly at the level allowed by the Codex Alimentarius for products that normally contain gluten but have had their gluten removed—and of the three brands had the least amount of cross-contamination. We must caution, however, that the sampling done in the study was much to small to make any firm conclusions about the average level of gluten-contamination of each of these brands. This study shows that cross-contamination is indeed a concern for celiacs who want to try oats. Celiac patients should contact oat millers directly and talk to them about their clean-out procedures, and whether they have done any testing of their own for gluten cross-contamination.
  16. I am somewhat new with a Celiacs Diagnosis, (2 months) via biopsy and blood tests. Short version, I get VERY VERY ill within an hour (+/-) after ingesting Gluten. I get anxiety, racing heart, palpitations, sweating for about 8-12 hours and then the stomach pains, vomiting/upset stomach and finally fatigue and numbness in joints! All in all, miserable for about 24 hours! Sorry for the graphic detail above, but just still annoyed, frustrated, etc. Anyhow, Last night my Fiance and I had a gluten free dinner. Chicken, fresh green beans and potatoes. I used Certified Gluten Free Hidden Valley Farms seasoning mix. About and hour later the awkward feelings started..the anxiety, heart and so on. We looked at all the ingredients this morning, checked Hidden Valley Farms websites for cross contamination. Nothing! So, the one thing we traced it back to was he had drank a beer and we were using the same dipping sauce for the chicken. Is it POSSIBLE to get that sick from him contaminating the sauce? We used the same bowl and of course, "double dipping" . This is the second time in a month this has happened. I ate off his fork at a restaurant and then had some of his steak the next day and got sick. We blamed it on the restaurant, but I had steak and did not get sick until I ate his leftovers the next day. Can another person's mouth contaminate my food if they have had gluten? Crazy question I know, but this is a crazy disease!
  17. Celiac.com 12/16/2013 - Numerous popular herbal products may be contaminated or may contain unlabeled substitute ingredients and fillers, meaning that they are not what their labels claim. According to the World Health Organization, adulterated herbal products are a potential threat to consumer safety. These revelations came to light after a group of Canadian researchers conducted an investigation into herbal product integrity and authenticity, with hopes of protecting consumers from health risks associated with product substitution and contamination. Using a test called DNA barcoding, a kind of genetic fingerprinting that been effective in uncovering labeling fraud in other commercial industries, the researchers found that nearly 60% of herbal products tested were not what their label claimed them to be, and that pills labeled as popular herbs were often diluted or replaced entirely, sometimes with cheap fillers that could be dangerous to consumers. In all, the researchers tested 44 herbal products from 12 companies, along with 30 different species of herbs, and 50 leaf samples collected from 42 herbal species. The researchers were Steven G. Newmaster, Meghan Grguric, Dhivya Shanmughanandhan, Sathishkumar Ramalingam and Subramanyam Ragupathy. They are variously affiliated with the Centre for Biodiversity Genomics, Biodiversity Institute of Ontario (BIO) at the University of Guelph, the Bachelor of Arts and Science Program at the University of Guelph in Guelph, Ontario, Canada, and with the Plant Genetic Engineering Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Bharathiar University in Tamil Nadu, India. Their laboratory also assembled the first standard reference material (SRM) herbal barcode library from 100 herbal species of known provenance that were used to identify the unknown herbal products and leaf samples. The team recovered DNA barcodes from most herbal products (91%) and all leaf samples (100%), with 95% species resolution using a tiered approach (rbcL + ITS2). Nearly 60% of the products tested contained DNA barcodes from plant species not listed on the labels. That means they were not what the label said they were. Furthermore, even though 48% of the products contained authentic ingredients, one-third of those also contained contaminants and/or fillers not listed on the label. The air data showed clearly that most herbal products tested were not what their labels claim, while most of the rest were poor quality, and often contained unlabeled, possibly dangerous, product substitute, contamination and fillers. They note that selling weak, ineffective, or mislabeled herbal supplements reduces the perceived value of otherwise helpful products by eroding consumer confidence. The study team recommends that the herbal industry embrace DNA barcoding to ensure authentic herbal products by effectively documenting raw manufacturing materials. They suggest that the use of an SRM DNA herbal barcode library for testing bulk materials could provide a method for 'best practices' in the manufacturing of herbal products, and note that this would provide consumers with safe, high quality herbal products. What do you think? Should herbal products and supplements be tested, authenticated and verified? Share your thoughts below. Source: BMC Medicine 2013, 11:222. doi:10.1186/1741-7015-11-222
  18. http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/herbal-product-contamination-considerable-dna-tests-find-1.1959278 "The tests identified several potential fillers, including rice, soybean and grasses such as wheat that could pose a health concern for people allergic to those plants and for consumers seeking gluten-free products" Be sure to try elimination herbal products if you are still experiencing symptoms on the gluten-free diet. It looks like this did not include products that were labelled gluten-free. This was a Canadian study. Do people think that it could be a problem in the US as well?
  19. Hey guys, I was diagnosed with Celiac Sprue based on tissue transglutaminase anti-body screening almost six years ago. I've been gluten free ever since. It wasn't until about 2-3 years ago that gluten free beer became a bit of a trend and my brother in law have got in to home brewing our very own gluten free beer. For our small 5 gallon batches every piece of equipment that I've used has been dedicated gluten free from the day I bought it. The question I have for everyone is: How comfortable are people drinking gluten free beer on non-dedicated gluten free lines? I believe that neither redbridge nor bards produces their gluten-free beers on dedicated lines, they instead clean the shared equipment. I wanted to get the view of other celiacs about gluten free beer (and for now I'm completely ignoring beer that tries to lower its barley content like estrella and omission). Thanks guys
  20. Rather than ask related question in several other threads and hijacking everyone else I decided I should ask this: I have had a really bad couple of weeks. I thought it was allergy and weather extremes. I've always had this sort of thing, migraines, various autoimmune problems and that could of course be exactly why the last couple of weeks have been bad but how do I know the difference? Years ago I began having migraines, problems with my pituitary that went undiagnosed then underdiagnosed and then other autoimmune problems began. I was born with pretty bad allergies. In general I have to say there is improvement because I'm not eating obvious gluten. Before now I ate whole foods, fresh or frozen veggies and fruit, eggs, milk, cheese, homemade yogurt, brown rice, single spices (not blends) and healthy fats. I haven't had much trouble figuring out what was safe to eat and gluten free because eating the way I do is straightforward. I know what is in my food because it's recognizable and I put it there. So, What is the best approach to getting gluten out of my life? I'm single so I don't share dishes, pot, pans and utensils. Will I need to buy some things new because they have been contaminated beyond what the dishwasher can clean? Living in an apartment means having your stuff at the mercy of your neighbor's bugs (something I learned the hard way years ago) so I always keep things sealed in airtight containers or bags. Most people who cook and don't do this have all sorts of stuff in their cabinets, refrigerator and freezer that I don't, but every-time something is opened, I know there are unintentional traces left behind. Do I need to hire cleaning of the areas that could be contaminated like kitchen cabinets, drawers, pantry and surrounding surfaces and carpeting? How far can the contamination travel? How do the rest of you know the difference between migraine, brain fog and feeling sick because of mold in the spring or from accidental glutening? I don't doubt anymore that I have a problem with gluten. I just don't know how to tell it apart from whatever else is going on.
  21. I was diagnosed in september and took until february to feel 100% again. I was never so strict about a diet during this time, at almost all my meals at home and only at at restaurnts with a dedicated gluten-free menu, made it difficult sometimes going out with freinds and while my fiance has been supportive a main point of contention between us is that I am too high strung over this whole thing. For example he thinks if you read a label and all the ingreidents are gluten-free but the label doesn't say it, still ok to eat. At restaurants just let them you have it and just trust whatever comes at me. Recently we went away and we stayed at all inclusive hotel and i just ate at the buffett: salads, rice and whatever looked ok to me. I was fine while I was there but when I got home, my stomach was such a mess. The other thing that I did for the first time there was have vodka after reading a lot of articles saying it should technically be ok since its distilled. Like i said I dont seem to react to gluten immediately it seems like it is days later that i get sick so it feels impossible to back track and figure out exactly what went wrong. I know I got a little too adventurous with a few different things at the same time (just wanted to be normal for 1 week out of my life!) but I was hoping for some help: 1) Do I always have to be so neurotic with labels, and only have it if they label it gluten-free? 2) whats the rule with natural flavors? i dont know what that means! is it ok or not? Same with food coloring. 3) I am really not that big of a drinker I actually just prefer a glass of wining if anything at all but if i do go out with my friends or at a wedding or just want a drink, what am i allowed to have? Was it a huge mistake to have vodka? 4) How strict do i need to be at restaurants? Can I have fish if I just ask for it with lemon on the grill? Or should I just not eat at the restaurants that have waiters that stare at me like I have two heads when I say I have gluten allergy? Sorry I know this is a lot. I am just feeling overwhelmed right now. Trying so hard to find a balance. Thanks for any advice! really appreciated! -michelle
  22. Celiac.com 03/11/2013 - People with celiac disease must follow a gluten-free diet if they want to remain healthy, but a 200-patient study conducted by Alvine Pharmaceuticals show that 90 percent of celiac patients who followed a gluten-free diet still reported symptoms of the disease. That reality is helping to drive an effort by Alvine to develop a drug that would help those people to avoid symptoms and damage that come with accidental exposure to gluten. According to a recent press release, Alvine had already raised at least $42 million for its celiac disease drug, and now has $6 million more as it works through a second phase 2 trial. The company's top drug prospect is ALV003, a mix of two recombinant gluten-specific proteases that’s designed to be used along with a gluten-free diet to prevent immune reactions associated with celiac disease. As disclosed in a recently filed U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission document, the company has raised at least $6 million in debt and other non-equity securities, and could raise up to $500K more. ALV003 is designed to be taken orally by people with celiac disease at the time of a meal. It mixes with and breaks down the gluten in food before it can reach the small intestine, where it would cause inflammatory responses. The drug is designed to prevent accidental gluten contamination, not to allow celiac sufferers to freely and safely consume large amounts of gluten. In a phase 2a study, ALV003 met its goals and reduced gluten-induced intestinal injury in celiac patients who were already following a gluten-free diet. According to clinicaltrial.gov, ALV003 is presently in a study phase with a March 2013 completion date. In the fall of 2012, Alvine received permission from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to fast-track ALV003, which means the company can work more closely with the FDA during clinical trials, and may get a faster review if they file a New Drug Application. Alvine is a San Carlos, California-based biopharmaceutical company founded in 2006 on technology from Stanford University. Its investors include Abbott Biotech Ventures, Panorama Capital, InterWest Partners, Prospect Venture Partners, Sofinnova Ventures, Black River Asset Management and Flagship Ventures. Read more here.
  23. Celiac.com 08/31/2010 - In my work as an author, researcher, and gluten-free advocate, I know how challenging the gluten-free diet can be. One of the most vital and tricky parts of the diet is learning what foods have gluten and which are "naturally" gluten-free as well as learning how to read labels. Unfortunately, these aren't always enough. Just because a grain is supposed to be "naturally" gluten-free, doesn't mean that it is. In fact, a recent study tested 22 so-called "inherently" gluten-free grains and found that over thirty percent of them had gluten. Gluten is a protein found in the grains wheat, barley, and rye, and is inherently lacking in grains such as oats, buckwheat, quinoa, millet, soy, sorghum, flaxseed, rice, and amaranth seed. A study tested 22 of these "naturally" gluten-free grains, and 7 of them had a gluten amount higher than 20 ppm, which would disqualify them from being labeled as gluten-free under the proposed FDA guidelines. One type of soy flour tested had nearly 3,000 ppm of gluten, two millet flour products had an average of between 305-327 ppm, and the sorghum flour had a mean average of 234 ppm. Four of those seven products didn't have allergen advisory statements. What's the reason behind these alarming research results? Dr. Mercola, an osteopathic physician and board-certified family medicine doctor, attributes the cause to cross-contamination during the processing of these grains and also to a lack of testing of final products for gluten. Dr. Mercola, who is trained in both traditional and natural, or holistic, medicine, raises the question, however, about whether not only celiacs but people in general should even be consuming grains in the first place. According to Dr. Mercola, "Most people need to avoid grains." On his website, he states that several autoimmune disorders, not just celiac disease, can be "significantly improved by avoiding grains," and eliminating grains from your diet can also decrease your risk of heart disease, high cholesterol, Type 2 Diabetes, and cancer. This is due to the fact that, as Dr. Mercola explains, "grains and sugars are inherently pro-inflammatory and will worsen any condition that has chronic inflammation at its root – and not just inflammation in your gut, but anywhere in your body." In his experience, about 75-80% of all people benefitted from going grain-free. According to Grain Free Living, the health benefits of going grain-free have been proven "through the personal experience of hundreds of people worldwide who have experienced significant relief from symptoms of Crohn's disease (and many other illnesses of the digestive system) and also for chronic fatigue." The mainstream medical community has been critical of the "anecdotal evidence" from the testimonies of those who have reported an improvement in health. Clinical studies on the matter have yet to be carried out. A grain-free diet doesn't have to be boring. In fact, grain-free cookbooks have come out with grain-free recipes for favorite American foods such as pancakes, muffins, lasagna, cakes, and cookies. For those who have a digestive or other condition or who wish to eliminate health risks, I would recommend talking to your healthcare practitioner about a grain-free diet. For the gluten-free community who wishes to continue to eat grains, this study of the gluten content of "naturally" gluten-free grains can be startling. Look for grain products that are certified gluten-free by such organizations as the Gluten-Free Certification Organization (GFCO) or make sure to do thorough company research before you try "inherently" gluten-free grains. References: Thompson T, Lee A, Grace T. Gluten contamination of grains, seeds, and flours in the United States: A pilot study. J Am Diet Assoc. 2010;110:937-940. Abstract available at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20497786 Thompson, T. Contamination of Naturally Gluten-Free Grains. Living Gluten-Free. June 1, 2010. Available at: http://www.diet.com/dietblogs/read_blog.php?title=&blid=19524
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