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Found 18 results

  1. Newbie mom of 15 yr old DD diagnosed 3 weeks ago. Just purchased brand new Farbwrware, nonstick items. Are these safe to use for her needs? Is it just scratched or oldish Teflon that's not suitable or all Teflon? These will only be used for gluten-free cooking. Trying to learn e as we go.
  2. Hello all, I'm new to this website and figured it would be in my best interest to go ahead and make a small post about myself, mostly because I'm having a lot of trouble trying to adapt to my new lifestyle, and it is irritating me to no end. I lived in South Korea for three years previously, moved home for ~8 months (during which time I was diagnosed with celiac) and have returned to Korea. When I was diagnosed, I was already planning on returning and I was highly positive that I'd be able to handle living in Asia with celiac. Well......... it has been 2 months now and it's much harder than I imagined. However, it is much easier (and way cheaper) to order gluten-free foods online here than I could have imagined, so that's one perk! I am mostly just hoping to receive some positive vibes from you all.... I'm trying my best but it doesn't really seem like my best is good enough. I've got separate sponges for dishes (no dish washer), separate pans for cooking (gluten-free pasta is more expensive than in the states so I don't let my bf eat it..ha), use steel wool if I'm ever in doubt, clean my countertops religiously, take daily (gluten-free) vitamins, check labels like never before, and eat out as little as possible, and yet.. I still manage to make myself sick at least once a week. Usually on the weekend when I try to eat out, but sometimes when I try cooking, as well. That's probably the most irritating thing... putting effort into cooking and then making myself sick. One of my favorite things about Korea is it's food and eating at restaurants with my friends, so it has been realllyyyy tough for me to let go of that part of my life. Luckily my boyfriend has been incredible about my struggles and is always willing to help (he even found me fried chicken with 100% rice flour!), which has been huge for me. Probably would be headed home right now if it weren't for him, quite honestly, which is super depressing to think about because I always thought I was so 'adaptable' and capable of making changes, persevering, etc..and I also really love living abroad and Korea in general!! Anyway.. sorry for the ramble here! I'm so glad there is a community like this. I definitely need it! Especially from across the world. I don't particularly know what kind of replies I'm expecting, if any, but if anyone has had any similar experiences (travel, living abroad, etc) please share!!!!!
  3. George Macdonald

    Puberty

    Hi! My name is George. I am 13 years of age and I am struggling with a problem. I was diagnosed with celiac about 6 months ago after having stomachs and short stature. I love this new diet now that I am starting to develop muscles. The good things end there. I hate seeing all my friends eat sandwiches, cake, cookies, pizza etc. I also have been dealing with delayed puberty. Is this linked with celiac? Should I tell my parents? Should I see an endocrinologist? Please help me. -George P.S. An adult didn't write this I am just very educated.
  4. Hi I'm Jay and my longtime girlfriend was just diagnosed with Celiac via Lab results and biopsy ( I actually have type 1 diabetes). I have a few questions about this disease and the gluten-free lifestyle. Is this an "All or none" kind of thing? Can some people cheat occasionally and sneak a little Gluten here and there or does she have to completely cut out the Gluten, forever? The biggest concern for her is the beer. Beer is her hobby, sounds funny and no she is not an alcoholic but she loves craft beer and beer culture. Most of our vacations are mapped out by which new brewery we will be close to. I have tried gluten-free beer before in the past and it was NOT good. Does anybody have any good hoppy beer recommendations? Does anybody have a favorite book on Celiac disease. I'm trying to keep things positive but as soon as you do an internet search on the topic, things get pretty scary (just like any other medical condition). Good cookbook recommendations? Finally, what is the biggest misconception you have heard about this disease? What was the hardest thing for you to cope with? Thanks, Jay
  5. Do you watch for any other problematic ingredients when cooking gluten-free aside from gluten? A recent post on Paleoandjuliet dot com talked about the magazine, Gluten-Free Living and recipes that included food coloring. Wondering whether you're strictly gluten-free, but will eat other unhealthy ingredients, or you're gluten-free and try to eliminate all unhealthy choices?
  6. Being Celiac, I have taught myself how to bake using gluten free ingredients and i want to share my recipes with as many as i can so that people can realise it's not all bad and we can eat yummy things too! I'm also a small/new YouTuber and i have made a gluten free halloween cupcake recipe video, for any one that may want to check it out here's the link https://youtu.be/mTrJMB2ZYXg I'd really appreciate any feedback! Thank you Georgia x
  7. Hello everyone, So around Christmas time I love to have Onion Chutneys, pickles etc. So I was wondering if anyone had a Sweet onion chutney recipe, or a brand they think will be great Thanks in advance. Sophie xx
  8. I recently found out I have a gluten sensitivity. I have been gluten-free for a month. I made PB cookies for my husband, and was very careful about not inhaling the flour. Yet, before I even got the first batch of cookies in the oven I was feeling weird. Now I have all the symptoms as if I had actually ate the cookies. This is normal? Am I really THAT sensitive to flour??
  9. Celiac.com 03/07/2014 - Our latest gluten-free celebrity news comes with word from eon line.com that actress Jennifer Esposito has sparked a bit of a dustup with Rachael Ray over an episode of Ray's 3 in the Bag that aired earlier this month on Food Network, in which Ray shared some favorite gluten-free recipes. Actress-turned-activist Jennifer Esposito called Ray out for failing to make any mention of celiac disease, and dubbed Ray's efforts a "wasted opportunity," for failing to mention celiac disease, gluten sensitivity or cross-contamination, adding: "Why be responsible?" Esposito also tweeted, "That would mean @rachaelray would have to understand what she is actually speaking about." Esposito also tweeted a link to a post in Gluten Dude's blog which slammed Ray. VIDEO: Get Jennifer Esposito's gluten-free pizza recipe! The former Blue Bloods star ended by tweeting: It's a shame that their r so many suffering at the hands of ignorance such as this." Esposito claims her doctor-advised 2012 medical leave from the show for celiac disease led to her suspension from the CBS series. Source: eonline
  10. Hello, everyone my name is Sophie and this is the first time in posting anything as I only found this amazing and wonderful site today. I have a problem. I have loved baking ever since I was a children and it always brings me joy, But lately ever since I have had to turn to free from things such as gluten-free Flour, xanthan gum, Soy Milk etc. etc. I have found my baking has just been failing and not working half the time. Either the bake with fall flat, not rise, won't cook right. there's always something that goes wrong. When I was doing normal cooking without any allergies It was all going fine, but now not so much Does anyone have any tips of what might be going wrong or any tips for celiac, nut free, dairy free baking. Thanks SophieGoodswin xx
  11. Does anyone have a favorite gluten free cookbook, website or blog that they use for recipes? I have tried to recipes from glutenfreegoddess and both were so good. I grabbed 2 cookbooks at the library. 1 had no pictures...I'm super visual so I took that right back. The other has yummy looking recipes, but everything with flour has 4-6 different flours/starches. A bit overwhelming.
  12. Celiac.com 11/20/2012 - Gluten-free diets are making headlines and trimming waistlines. For those with celiac disease, gluten–free living is prescribed to ensure proper nutrient absorption, but just about everyone can benefit from eliminating gluten from their diet. While going gluten free may sound difficult, the benefits such as increased energy and a smaller belt size are well worth the effort. Cutting gluten from your diet is not synonymous with cutting taste. There are so many delicious gluten-free substitutes, one of which is garbanzo bean flour. Garbanzo bean flour, also know as chickpea flour, gram flour and besan is made from grinding dried chickpeas to a fine flour that can be used by itself or blended with other flours. Garbanzo bean flour is an excellent substitute for the gluten-containing flours that are used for baking, such as wheat flour. It can also be used to thicken soups, sauces or gravies. Garbanzo bean flour is high in protein and low in fat. It is a good source of dietary fiber and iron and is completely grain-free. Garbanzo bean flour contains no cholesterol, sodium or saturated fat. Wheat flour, in contrast, contains 190 mg of sodium, less fiber, no vitamin C and less iron. Garbanzo bean flour is inexpensive, under $3.00 for 22 ounces and recipes required less garbanzo bean flour, 7/8 cup replace one cup of wheat flour. Garbanzo bean flour is easily found in most markets, but you can make your own at home by grinding dried chickpeas in a food processor and coffee/spice blender. As an experienced clinical nutritionist, I work with people who have a wide variety of health issues. My specialties include the gluten-free diet and weight loss. Over the past 20 years, I have seen significant health improvement in my clients after only one week on the gluten-free diet and continued changes for the better as they embrace a gluten-free lifestyle. Gluten-free living has changed my life and it can improve yours. The gluten-free diet can help with weight management; it can elevate your energy levels, improve your attention and speed up your digestion. Whatever your motivation is for going gluten free - whether you have celiac disease, gluten intolerance or a desire to live a healthier, stronger life, my book, The Gluten-Free Edge, will help you to achieve your goal. It’s an easy-to-read guide to living without gluten that includes 200 delicious gluten-free recipes. This book will also help you with social situations and teach you the key to reading food labels. You will learn how to look for gluten-free products both at restaurants and in your supermarket. The Gluten-Free Edge is equipped with all of the information you need to get through the world without gluten.
  13. Hello Everyone! I will admit that before becoming a Celiac (about two weeks ago) I loved everything breaded! Bread Crumbs are always present in a abundance in my kitchen....now.....not so much. I went to a couple of my local grocery stores looking for a good sub. Now I have given rice flour a try, but I want that crunch/ texture of bread crumbs. I also tried some corn gluten free guarantee to be the best thing ever $8 bag of stuff, ehh it was ok. So about four days ago I started to put everything together to make some Danish meatballs, only to remember that I could not have the bread crumbs in it any more So I decided to be inventive. I noticed my box of rice chex. And decided why not? So I subbed my 1/2 cup of bread crumb for a 1/2 cup of crushed up Rice Chex cereal. And they turned out great! Last night I used crushed up Corn Chex to make a outer coating to some baked chicken legs. Nice and crunchy. Just though I would share What are things other people have come up with to sub for bread crumbs? Let me know
  14. Knox un-flavored gelatin is readily available in regular grocery stores in the baking supplies area. It adds moisture and helps bind ingredients. It is a welcome addition to bread recipes with gluten-free flours. Besides commercially prepared Egg Replacer, Flaxseed can be used as an egg substitution. Mixing one tablespoon ground flaxseed with two tablespoons warm water for each egg. Let it sit after adding. If you are soy tolerant, add one half teaspoon lecithin to this mixture plus one teaspoon baking powder to help the leavening process. When substituting this mixture for a regular egg, add one extra. Duck eggs are often tolerated by those who have problems with chicken eggs. They can be hard to find. Look for them in Chinese markets. Coconut milk is a good substitute for cow and soy milk.
  15. TiffersAnn

    Changes

    Wow, so I was just re-reading my old entries... boy have I changed. I no longer give a crap if people around me eat pizza because I don't want to feel bad anymore. If I do have these cravings for certain foods, I have learned to make them myself. Even my husband loves my gluten-free pizza! My changed attitude over the years is attributed to learning as many different recipes and varieties of food I possibly can. Before discovering I was Celiac I had never tried Thai food... now, I LOVE Thai food. The best part is that most Thai food is gluten-free.
  16. Celiac.com 01/25/2009 - It’s a brand new year with a brand new vibe. I’m excited to be launching a new year of education and advocacy on behalf of the gluten-free community, beginning with an upcoming speaking engagement. On February 10th, I’ll have the opportunity to speak with and hold a gluten-free cooking demonstration for chefs-in-training at the Western Culinary Institute, in Portland, Oregon. They may be a challenging audience, as I attempt to encourage them to think “outside the box” of more is better when it comes to exotic ingredients. The trend of the past decade seemed to be “vertical food”, with a sauce, a base, a main ingredient, another sauce, topped by two or three garnishes. While dishes resembling food-as-art may tickle the taste-buds, they are a minefield for those with food allergies and sensitivities. The incidence of food allergies, which were once rare, has increased 18% in recent years and the numbers of people affected continue to grow. [The top eight food allergens are: dairy (cow’s milk), eggs, peanuts, tree nuts (almonds, pecans, walnuts, hazelnuts etc.), wheat, soy, fish, and shellfish – and corn is another top allergen] Food allergies seldom come individually - chances are that the person allergic to peanuts is also allergic to eggs or dairy, or both. So, what’s can a foodie with food allergies to do? Forgo attending family events, parties, and other social engagements, or worse, bring their own food in an attractive Tupper-ware container? Sadly, these are options that many of the food-allergic have to consider. Handling a life with food allergies is a challenge for adults, and must be especially difficult for parents of kids with multiple food allergies, who bear the responsibility of safe-guarding their children's health. It may surprise you to know that four million American children have food allergies - that’s a sizable portion of future consumers for any business to consider. Food sensitivities are also a big issue with many adults. Lactose intolerance and gluten intolerance are problems for many people, and finding safe, healthy and interesting food choices is not easy. Here’s a story that illustrates how we’ve had to adapt. Recently we spent a ski weekend in Bend, Oregon. I baked my own gluten-free bread, and brought along other treats to keep in our hotel room. I asked the maitre de at our hotel to check with the chef about the preparation of foods in the breakfast buffet, so I would know what, if anything, I could eat. Mostly I made do with tea, fresh fruit, and my home-made gluten-free challah bread. Lunch was a no-brainer – there wouldn’t be much that I could safely eat at the ski resort, so I brought along some gluten-free Larabars – (ingredients: dates, almonds, dried apples, cinnamon) and we planned an early dinner. Later that evening, in a popular Bend landmark, I was happy to see a few choices I thought I could eat, with a few modifications. When my entree of seared Ahi tuna arrived, my son commented, “Mom, you must be an expert on that dish by now – I’ve seen you order it in a dozen restaurants!” He was right. Plain seared Ahi tuna, coated only in sesame seeds, served on greens, with a rosette of pickled ginger and wasabi, is my restaurant stand-by. I love Japanese food, but this popular dish is often served at seafood restaurants and sidewalk cafes too. With a side of green salad, or maybe the vegetable of the day, I’m set. I do wish there were more offerings to choose from, and it’s a shame that there aren’t. Very fresh seasonal ingredients, simply prepared, are truly wonderful and full of flavor that doesn’t need to be covered up by crusts, sauces, or heavy spices. A glance at the top eight is evidence that allergies to fruits, vegetables, or fresh herbs are less common than allergies to high protein foods. So, why not use them in abundance? Here’s another story that illustrates my point. While in Costa Rica a few years ago, my family had many wonderful meals. The food was always very fresh, and naturally gluten and dairy free. I never needed to check with the staff – I only needed to read the menu like anyone else. But we all agree that the very best meal we had was the night we drove down a rutted dirt road to a shack on the beach, where the sun was just beginning to set. The place looked deserted, with no lights and no customers. I asked my husband, “are you sure this is the place?” He said he’d followed the directions he’d been given. My mind began to spin some of the scary scenarios I’d seen in movies. As soon as our car pulled to a stop, we were surrounded by the ubiquitous barking dogs found in every village in Central America. A screen door slammed shut, and a slightly built man came up to the car. My husband rolled the window down and said in Spanish that we’d heard that this was a great place to eat. The gentleman led us into a gazebo, lit some candles, and seated us at a rickety table. He did not hand us any menus. Our host told us that he had caught two kinds of fish that day – swordfish and tuna. He said we could have them prepared with either ginger or garlic. He did not describe the method of preparation or what else came with the meal. Since we were rapidly being devoured by mosquitoes, we chose our options quickly. A few minutes later we were handed a can of “Deep-Woods OFF” Mosquito repellant, with a smile, and our host/fisherman, and presumably chef, left to prepare our dinner. In about twenty minutes, he arrived bearing four large platters of steaming hot grilled fish, well-coated with our seasonings of choice and garnished by fresh grilled vegetables and greens, warm home-made corn tortillas, salsa, and rice. Nothing else. It was the freshest, most deliciously prepared meal I had ever eaten. And I think it cost about twelve dollars for the four of us. So, I’m going to talk with these aspiring chefs about the importance of including simply prepared but still delicious foods on their menus. I may never tire of seared tuna, but it may not be someone else’s cup of tea. Reasonable choices should be part of any menu, and can be, with a conscious effort. At my husband’s Christmas party, I was pleasantly surprised by a buffet I could actually eat. The menu consisted of three types of small kabobs: plain grilled vegetables, grilled shrimp still in the shell, and grilled chicken, a huge tray of freshly prepared sushi, with ginger and sauces on the side, and another huge tray of Vietnamese salad rolls in rice paper wrappers. I asked first about marinades, avoided any dipping sauces, and was just fine. It was fun to be able to partake of the beautiful buffet, and I went out of my way to personally thank the catering crew. Some of the worst food from a nutritional stand-point, and certainly the worst from the perspective of someone with food allergies, has been served in the cafeterias of hospitals where I’ve worked or visited patients.. In these institutions dedicated to promoting health, nearly every entrée is breaded, sauced, cheese-coated, or poached in a pool of milk. Thanks goodness for the salad bar. Even the soups are suspect, as they are usually mass-produced, or made from a dry mix containing ingredients that the food-allergic cannot tolerate. Surely our institutions and hospitals can do better. Whether these future chefs work in a food service, or an up-and-coming tapas bar, I’m hoping to inspire them to use their creativity in a different way, to offer the freshest, healthiest food possible, and minimize the number of sauces and extraneous ingredients in at least a portion of the dishes they develop. I’ll also talk about the growing epidemic of gluten-intolerance in this country and the possible impacts it will have on the food industry. In fact, I think I’ve found the topic for my next article!
  17. Xanthan gum can be substituted for guar gum. Rice bran can be substituted for rice polish. Sweet rice is a rice that is low (10 to 18 percent) in the starch compound called amylose. White rice can NOT be substituted for sweet rice (it is not sticky enough ). Tapioca flour works roughly the as tapioca starch. gluten-free breads should be beaten by hand with a wooden spoon or spatula. A whisk doesnt work - the batter should be a bit too thick for this. The mix master over-beats them and they get too fine a texture and tend to fall. I believe this is what happens in bread machines. If you put 1 ½ tsp. of Cream of Tartar and 1 tsp. of baking soda in for two loaves, they do not interfere with the yeast but help the bread to rise and keep it up during baking. Limit the use of potato, bean, arrowroot and tapioca flour to about 25 % maximum. If the bread is sticky when baked, cut these flours down further. Gluten Free All-purpose Flour (mix well): 4 cups brown rice flour 1 ½ cups Sweet Rice Flour 1 cup Tapioca Starch Flour 1 cup Rice Polish 1 tablespoon Guar Gum
  18. ¾ teaspoon of xanthan gum per cup of flour & one teaspoon of methylcellulose per cup of flour. Clear Gel in place of methylcellulose has the advantage of being much cheaper and more readily available than methylcellulose. If flour is the only ingredient that contains gluten, then you can convert it to a gluten-free recipe. Just replace the flour with Bette Hagmans gluten-free flour mix: 2 parts white rice flour 2/3 part potato starch flour 1/3 part tapioca flour and a teaspoon of xanthan gum Beware of spices which contain wheat flour! Many manufacturers use wheat flour to keep spices from clumping.