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Found 8 results

  1. I’m always looking for different ways to use jalapeños or other peppers in dishes you expect to find them. I like using coarse, stone ground cornmeal in any cornbread recipe and gluten-free flour actually gives the bread really interesting flavor. This recipe is buttery and delicious and has a great chewy texture. Ingredients: 1½ cups stone ground yellow cornmeal 1 cup gluten-free flour ( I use Bob’s Red Mill or Authentic Foods, but feel free to use your favorite) 3 tablespoons seeded and chopped jalapeños, about 1-2 peppers 1 teaspoon baking powder ½ teaspoon baking soda ¼ cup sugar 2 teaspoons salt 1 egg, lightly beaten 2 sticks butter, melted 1¼ cups buttermilk Directions: Preheat oven to 400°F and brush a 10-inch square baking dish with butter. In a large bowl, combine cornmeal, flour, baking powder, baking soda, sugar and salt. In a separate bowl, whisk together eggs, milk, and butter. Slowly add wet mixture to dry ingredients. Stir until lumps dissolve but do not over-mix. Let batter sit at room temperature for 15 minutes. Pour batter into pan and bake for about 30 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean. Allow to cool before serving.
  2. I'm a sucker for good gluten-free cornbread. I'm an even bigger sucker for this gluten-free bacon and cheese corn-bread. I like to make this with Bob's Red Mill Gluten-free Cornbread Mix, but you can use your favorite kind. You might need to play with the recipe a bit to get it just right, but when you do, the pan will be empty, and the family happy and smiling. I like to serve this with gluten-free stews or chili for a sure-fire dinner hit. The corn, bacon and cheese work well to offset any dryness that so often goes with gluten-free baked goods. I like to serve this fresh out of the oven and slathered with butter and honey, alongside my favorite stew, soup, or chili. Ingredients: Bob's Red Mill Gluten-free Cornbread Mix 2 eggs 1 ½ cups milk 1/3 cup of olive oil 1 can (6 oz) sweet corn, well-drained ½ pound of bacon, cooked and chopped ½ pound of artisan cheddar cheese, shredded Butter Honey (optional) Directions: Mix cornbread as per directions. When mix is ready, stir in corn, bacon and cheese. Remember to allow for extra room in the pan due to the bacon, cheese and corn. I often make muffins for this reason. Bake for 20-25 minutes at 375 degrees F., or as directed. It's done when you can insert a toothpick and it comes out clean.
  3. This article originally appeared in the Summer 2002 edition of Celiac.com's Journal of Gluten-Sensitivity. What was your first reaction when your doctor told you that anything containing gluten had to be eliminated from your diet? After you stopped screaming, “But I HAVE to have my pizza!” did you begin to panic? Know this—there is almost NOTHING that you used to eat before being diagnosed that you cannot eat now; you just have to learn to make it a little differently. If you don’t know how to do something it can seem difficult at first, but with a little experience it becomes easy. This same principle applies to the multitude of combinations of the various alternative flours used in gluten-free baking. The basic gluten-free flour mixture consists of 2 cups rice flour, 1 cup potato starch flour, and 1 cup tapioca flour. This combination may be used to replace wheat flour in most of your recipes. However, there are as many combinations of flours as you have imagination, each serving a different purpose. Do you want your cakes to be lighter? Add a little bean flour to your mixture (not too much or it will leave an aftertaste). Garbanzo and/or mung bean flours are excellent for this purpose. Want to make bread? Make a flour mixture with mostly potato starch flour, tapioca flour and cornstarch. If you can find the elusive sweet potato flour (sold at most Asian markets), add it to your cookie flour mixture to improve its texture. Each type of flour has its own unique properties and taste, and if you find a combination of flours that you really like, sift large amounts together, spoon it into freezer bags, and freeze them until needed. This will put an end to you having to drag out all of the different bags and boxes of flours each time you want to bake. For those new to the gluten-free diet you will notice that when you bite into a muffin or cookie it may fall apart. Alternative flours do not bind as well as wheat flour, so it is necessary to add a binder to them. Do not be intimidated by the name xanthan gum. It is a white powder that is usually packaged in a small pouch and can be found at most health food stores. Add a little xanthan gum to a recipe to prevent your baked goods from crumbling. Guar gum may also be used in place of the xanthan gum, but in some people it can have a laxative effect. Unflavored gelatin may also be added as a binder in place of the gums; just be sure to use twice as much of it in the recipe to replace the gum. You will find that the alternative flours are heavier and don’t have as much taste as wheat flour. Not to worry - add twice the amount of baking soda or baking powder called for in the wheat version of the recipe. You can also double the amount of flavoring (vanilla, almond, etc.). Use your imagination and add extra ingredients that will enhance the taste…toasted nuts or coconut, chocolate pieces, Kahlua, dried fruits, fresh fruits, etc. Many people with celiac disease also have other dietary concerns, such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure, lactose intolerance, casein-free, low or no sugar, allergies to yeast, corn, soy, berries, rice, nuts, eggs, etc. Even with other dietary restrictions, you can usually find alternative methods of preparation for most foods. The trick is to recreate the original taste and texture when you substitute ingredients. For example, in place of cane sugar you can use date sugar, beet sugar, fructose, canned fruit packed in juice, unsweetened applesauce, a jar of baby strained prunes, shredded apples, mashed bananas or pure fruit juices. Toasting unsweetened coconut brings out the natural oils and will add a wonderful toasty sweetness to a baked product. If you need to limit your salt intake use herbs (lots of them!) as a replacement. Adding a lot of chopped celery to soups and stews will alleviate the need to add so much salt. Eggs add moisture and act as a binder in a baked product. If you cannot have them you can use one of the following replacement recipes for each 1 to 2 eggs called for in the recipe: 1 teaspoon baking powder, 1 Tablespoon liquid, and 1 Tablespoon vinegar 1 teaspoon yeast dissolved in ¼ cup warm water 1 ½ Tablespoons water, 1 ½ Tablespoons oil, 1 teaspoon gluten-free baking powder 1 packet unflavored gelatin, 2 Tablespoons warm water (Do not mix until ready to use.) ¼ cup soft silken tofu and ¼ teaspoon baking soda per 1 cup of flour called for in the recipe 3 Tablespoons applesauce plus 3 teaspoons powdered egg replacer If you cannot tolerate rice, replace the rice flour in the baking mixtures with potato starch flour. For casein-free diets, soy, rice, or coconut milk may be used as replacements for whole milk. If you want to thicken gravy and can’t use cornstarch, use potato flour (not to be confused with potato starch flour).For those who have to watch their cholesterol, use oil (preferably olive oil) in place of butter. Cholesterol is essential to life and is a necessary part of our cell structure. The human body makes an ample amount, so we do not need to consume additional cholesterol. Cholesterol is only found in foods of animal origin (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, and dairy products). Do not confuse this with "fat". While plants have zero cholesterol, they may be very high in fat content (such as palm and coconut oils). There are always ingredient alternatives no matter what your dietary restrictions are. In most cases you can still make and enjoy your favorite foods. Be confident that the foods you eat will be as varied and delicious as those you used to eat before. Life is good and, with a little extra planning, there is no need to stress out about eating. Cold Poached Salmon (low fat, low cholesterol, low sodium)Here is a cool entrée for those hot summer days, from the WFGF Reduced Calorie Cookbook.When cooking salmon, wash well with cold water, then pat dry with paper toweling. With a sharp knife, remove skin from fillets before cooking. The salmon may be poached the night before, then wrapped in plastic wrap and refrigerated. By eliminating the mayonnaise, this dish will be dairy-free. To serve, place salmon on top of Julienne Vegetables (recipe on page 42). Slice 4 thin slices of lemon; cut each slice almost in half, leaving one side of the rind in tact; twist to form an "S" shape, then lay on top of the salmon. Ingredients: 2 cups water 1 cup gluten-free white wine 2 Tablespoons lemon juice 6 bay leaves 1/8 teaspoon salt 1/8 teaspoon pepper 4 fillets (4 oz. each) salmon 4 teaspoons gluten-free lowfat mayonnaise 12 capers Directions: In a large skillet, combine water, wine, lemon juice, bay leaves, salt and pepper. Bring to a boil. Add fillets and simmer gently about 15 minutes or till opaque and fish flakes easily with a fork. Drain salmon, reserving bay leaves, and cool. Spread 1 teaspoon mayonnaise on top of each fillet. To garnish, angle a bay leaf in the center; cluster 3 capers at the base of the leaf.
  4. Ingredients: 2 eggs 1cup gluten-free sour cream 1 can gluten-free creamed corn 2/3 cup oil 1 ½ cornmeal 3 teaspoons baking powder 1 tablespoon salt (or less) 1 cup cheese Directions: Bake in preheated oven at 400F for 35 minutes in 9” x 12” pan or a hot iron skillet.
  5. Ingredients: 1 cup yellow cornmeal ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon baking soda 1/3 cup vegetable oil 1 cup gluten-free sour cream 1 cup corn 2 eggs, beaten 1 cup shredded Cheddar Directions: Mix together all ingredients except Cheddar. Put half of mixture into a greased 9" square pan. Sprinkle with cheese and cover with remaining mixture. Bake at 375F degrees for 35 - 40 minutes.
  6. In a blender process until smooth: 1 cup milk or rice milk or soy milk or buttermilk or water 1 egg or 2 egg whites ¼ cup oil (canola or safflower) ¼ cup pure maple syrup In a separate bowl, mix these dry ingredients with a wire whisk: 1 cup cornmeal 1 cup rice flour (brown or white or a combination of both) 2 teaspoons baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda ¼ to ½ teaspoon xanthan gum ¼ to ½ teaspoon salt Combine the wet and dry ingredients and mix gently but well for about one minute, then pour into a 8 or 9 square baking pan that has been sprayed or oiled. Bake at 400F for 25 minutes. Serve warm, directly from the pan, or let cool for 5 to 10 minutes. For a savory meal: Using a 9 x 12 pan (or close to it), spray or oil it, then put in: 1 large can diced tomatoes (28 oz.) 1 can drained beans (like pinto, black bean, garbanzo, or whatever you like) 1 or 2 diced zucchini Some other vegetable you like, corn, mushrooms, diced red or green bell peppers etc. Sprinkle on chili powder or pizza flavorings like basil and oregano to your taste Then pour cornbread mix right on top and bake 25 to 30 minutes at 400F. For a dessert cornbread: On the bottom of the pan, pour a can of fruit cocktail or sliced peaches or a can of pie filling To the dry ingredients add: ¼ cup sugar, then bake as above. For a Gingerbread: Add ¼ cup molasses to the wet ingredients To the dry ingredients add: 2 teaspoons ground ginger 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon ¼ teaspoon ground cloves Optional: grated fresh ginger or finely chopped candied ginger, or both To make it more cake-like, decrease the cornmeal to ½ cup, and increase the flour to 1 ½ cups Bake as the original recipe.
  7. This recipe comes to us from M.J. Richards. Preheat oven to 425 2 cup gluten-free flour ½ cup 2 tablespoons sugar 1 ½ tablespoons baking powder (4 ½ t.) 1 teaspoon baking soda 2 cup white cornmeal (Martha White is my preferred brand) 1 cup buttermilk ½ cup milk 3 eggs ½ cup vegetable oil ½ teaspoon salt Sift together dry ingredients, add cornmeal. Mix together wet ingredients (best if all are at room temperature). Add to dry ingredients to 9x13 pan and mix well. Pour into greased pan, smooth. Bake at 425 fro 25 minutes.
  8. This recipe comes to us from Karen Oland. Preheat oven to 475F. While preheating, put cast iron skillet in oven, with a scant tablespoon corn, safflower or peanut oil in bottom. 6 heaping soup spoons (approx 1 cup) of corn flour/corn starch or corn flour/sorghum flour mix (3:1)* 1 rounded teaspoon baking powder ¼ teaspoon salt ¼ cup powdered milk (or powdered buttermilk) 1 egg Mix dry ingredients in mixing bowl. Wait until oven is preheated (or at 450F) before continuing. Mix enough water into dry ingredients to get to a "pancake batter" consistency (thinner than waffles, but not runny). Add one egg and beat well (batter gets a little volume to it - use a hand mixer if your arms arent up to the job). Pour into the hot skillet, return to oven and bake about 10 -14 minutes (until browned on top and at the edges). If you poke the top, it should not be "jiggly", but firm. Remove from oven, let cool slightly in pan, then cut and serve. If taking somewhere else for dinner, leave in pan, wrap in towels to transport (cast iron will keep it hot for some time). Serve with lots of fresh butter, honey and a glass of cold buttermilk Notes: * I use home ground corn and sorghum, the flour as finely ground as I can make it. But, a coarser corn meal can be used or even masa -- you just get different textures in the resulting bread. Colored corn meals will result in differently colored breads - mine is yellow as I use popcorn most of the time, but you can use a white corn or even blue or red corn to get fun colors (especially good for layered salads). Corn flour can be ground with an electric mill (I use popcorn) or purchased at most Mexican markets. Use a finely ground corn meal (I grind my own, same consistency as a fine flour). You can use all cornmeal, but it can be a little coarse --cornstarch lightens the resulting bread. The above recipe is cooked in a small (6") cast iron skillet and makes 4 pieces (increase proportionately for a medium (8") or large (10") skillet -about 8 and 11 spoonfuls of flour, respectively and increase eggs by one for each increase in size) Triple everything for "big" pan (14"), do not multiply by 4, gets too thick, doesnt cook in center of bread. If you use real buttermilk instead of the powdered plus water -- try to get one without gums added, otherwise the batter is difficult to get to the right consistency. Regular milk could also be used. Havent tried this with any milk or egg substitutes, so dont know if it would work. I do know if you make it with masa flour and a gum thickened buttermilk, it gets a very "cakey" consistency. Additional Comments from "Mom": I dont really have a cornbread recipe as such. I combine both cornmeal and flour with dry powdered milk and enough water to make a batter about like pancakes, and then beat in an egg. I use a soup spoon to measure, For a medium sized skillet, I use about 5 very heaping spoonfuls of meal and 3 very heaping spoonfuls of flour (You could use all cornmeal). For my little skillet I use about 5 spoonfuls total and about 10 or 11 for the large skillet. You just have to play with it a little to see how thick you want your bread. It is hard to mess up. I used to use self-rising flour and meal so leavening was not a problem. Now I try to guess on the amount and add baking powder and salt. I usually add 1 rounded tsp baking powder and ¼ teaspoon salt to small skillet, 2 rounded tsp baking powder and ½ teaspoon salt to middle size, or 3 rounded tsp baking powder and ¾ teaspoon salt to large. I think the recommended amount is 1 ¼ teaspoon baking powder and ¼ tsp salt to 1 cup flour or meal. For the powdered milk, I just pour some in dry into the other dry ingredients. You could also use milk from a bottle, but it is harder for me to get it right. I probably add 1/3 cup to the middle size. I dont measure, so Im not sure. If you want to use butter milk, you need to add a little bit of baking soda to dry ingredients-- probably ½ teaspoon to middle-size. I think that buttermilk batters look thicker than they really are and are harder to make come out right. When I use buttermilk (from a bottle), I try to keep the batter a little thicker than normal. For the water, I slowly add running tap water until the thickness looks right.
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