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Found 11 results

  1. Just wanted to share that there’s a gluten-free nail lacquer brand that’s made by a Celiac. It’s called Lazzara Gluten-Free Nail Lacquer. I was so excited because my favorite (former) brands have hydrolyzed wheat in them. It’s also cruelty-free, vegan and made in the USA. The only drawback is that it’s more expensive but I think it’s worth it because I know it’s being made by someone who’s a Celiac and I love the quality. http://Lazzara.ca
  2. Does anyone know if Kat Von D Foiled Love Lipstick is gluten free? -Natural Seed Oil (Castor): Acts an emollient and moisturizer. -Hydrogenated Polydecene: Emollient and contributes to long-wearing effect. -Vitamins A, C, and E: Provide antioxidant and antiaging properties. Those are the ingredients...I do not know if Vitamin E would be made from wheat or soy, has anyone else had problems with this lipstick? Thank you!
  3. Another reason to avoid many processed foods? “Two bacterial strains that have plagued hospitals around the country may have been at least partly fueled by a sugar additive in our food products, scientists say. Trehalose, a sugar that is added to a wide range of food products, could have allowed certain strains of Clostridium difficile to become far more virulent than they were before, a new study finds.” http://beta.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-sugar-c-diff-20180103-story.html Yuck! Just reading about how trehalose was developed and manufactured is enough to make you sick! ?
  4. Yvonne (Vonnie) Mostat, RN

    Skin Contamination and the Celiac

    Celiac.com 12/21/2017 - After a lot of trial and error we celiacs learn, often the hard way, to eliminate foods that are poisonous to our bodies. Sadly, we often forget about what "goes onto" our skin. Since the skin is the living outer layer of our bodies it absorbs not only water and oils, it also absorbs cosmetics that can be poisonous to our celiac bodies, most specifically those of us afflicted with dermatitis herpetiformis (often called celiac disease of the Skin). Men, before you set this article aside, thinking it's only for women and you are exempt, please read on. One of 133 Americans has a wheat-related allergy according to CNN.com. We have a tendency not to group toothpaste and lip-glosses with cosmetics, and we usually ignore vitamins and medications when researching celiac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis. We forget to ask our hairdresser what products they are using and whether they contain wheat or gluten, and glibly apply night creams (to absorb into our skin as we sleep) and mud packs that promise similar benefits. Inquiring into the gluten content of cosmetics, I contacted more than twenty leading companies, then I waited. I was discouraged, particularly by the blatant rudeness of some of the responses I received. Meanwhile, I had to learn whether gluten could be absorbed through the skin. Some websites answered that question with a direct "no". Even some physicians responded saying "no". However, since the skin is the largest living organ in the body and it does absorb various oils and emollients, listing gluten-containing components of medicinal and non-medicinal ingredients allows consumers with celiac disease (celiac disease) or wheat allergies to make informed choices when purchasing and/or consuming natural health products. It enables them to avoid gluten in quantities that may trigger adverse reactions. There are numerous articles on dermatitis herpetiformis and celiac disease making claims so contradictory that it is no wonder we are confused. And I'm not talking about accidental ingestion of gluten. Some such articles claim that trace amounts of gluten One article insists that the skin is not going to absorb gluten, even though our skin is a living organism that can absorb suntan lotions, trans-dermal drugs, etc. It is so susceptible to absorption that when you place a slice of onion in your sock you will taste it in your mouth the following day. How can these websites make such contrary claims? The skin absorbs flavors as well as creams containing gluten. On the other hand, "Glutino" had an article on record, written on September 14, 2010, regarding "Hidden Gluten in Health and Beauty Products". It states that if you apply hand lotion that contains gluten and then prepare food you are exposing yourself to accidental ingestion and your food to cross contamination. They suggest a site called: naturallydahling.com, a site that lists gluten-containing ingredients commonly used in cosmetics. Research proving the full extent of how much your skin absorbs is still unavailable, but to those who believe that "what goes on, goes in", the cosmetic industry is full of unknowns. The size of gluten molecules suggests that they may not be able to pass through the skin, but chemicals and technology designed to enhance skin absorption are already present, if not prevalent, in the cosmetic industry. These chemicals are potentially dangerous and often go untested for negative health effects, yet are widespread in lotions, antiperspirants, perfumes and the "Great Mother Market" anti-wrinkle cosmetics. Since the cosmetic industry is self-regulated it is more important than ever to carefully read labels and use natural or organic products whenever possible. If you find yourself reacting to a particular cosmetic, it is possible that you may have an increased sensitivity to gluten, an allergy or even dermatitis herpetiformis. But wait a minute! Aren't we told that gluten cannot pass through the skin? I suffered terribly from the use of an "Anti-Frizz" product for my hair that caused a massive outbreak of dermatitis herpetiformis. I should have read the label all the way down to the end. I would have found, in very small print, "wheat germ oil". When researching for this article, I wrote to the company and mentioned my problems with their product. I received an apology and a sample of their "new and improved" "Frizz-Ease" product. They obviously do not know their own products and the fancy names they use are as confusing to them as they are to me. The "new and improved" product contained Avena Sativa, the Latin name for OAT. I was also told that I likely just had "hives" on the back of my scalp, as oats are still somewhat controversial. Some research suggests that oats in themselves are gluten free, but that they are virtually always contaminated with other grains during cultivation, harvest, distribution or processing. Recent research indicates that a protein naturally found in oats (avenin) contains peptide sequences closely resembling some peptides from wheat gluten. The oat peptides caused mucosal inflammation in significant numbers of celiac disease sufferers. Some examination results show that even oats that are not contaminated with wheat particles may be dangerous. Again, I was told not to introduce oats into my diet, or use oatmeal as a facial mask until I had been free of a dermatitis herpetaformis outbreak for at least a year. Thus far I have not been able to get relief for that long. It seems the celiac or those who suffer from dermatitis herpetiformis {and let's face it, most people suffering from dermatitis herpetaformis have celiac disease} have to apply the rule of "caveat emptor" - Let the buyer beware. Tolerance to gluten varies among individuals with celiac disease and there are limited clinical scientific data on a threshold for the amount of gluten required to initiate or maintain an immunological reaction in celiac disease patients. "Therefore there is no clear consensus on a safe gluten threshold level." The Dermatologist I see at The University of British Columbia Hospital has told me to tell people in restaurants that gluten is poison to my system and I can become very ill from ingesting gluten. They are a little more careful before telling me a dish is gluten free, and hopefully through education the cosmetic industry is going to improve its testing and cease glibly stating things as "fact" when they simply do not know. Industries that produce over-the-counter medications and vitamin supplement, especially those that may contain gluten as a binding agent, should also be scrutinized. We have come a long way, but large challenges are still ahead. One of our biggest challenges is reading the labels on these products. One almost needs to carry a magnifying glass when shopping. Cosmetics, which include hair products, soaps, perfumes and toothpastes also run us into problems, often big, "itchy" problems. The male celiac/dermatitis herpetaformis experience can also include outbreaks from any product that comes into contact with the skin and particularly those that "stay" on the hair or skin. Who would have known that sun tan lotions could contain wheat germ oil? It is difficult enough to eliminate words such as "triticum vulgare" the Latin name of wheat or "wheat germ" containing ingredients! In preparation for this article, I contacted the following companies: Avon, Clairol, Clarins, Clinique, Coty, Covergirl, Estee Lauder, Garnier, John Frieda, John Paul Mitchell, L'Oreal, Mabelline, Marcelle, Neutrogena, Olay, Pantene, Revlon, and companies that go under general all-encompassing headings such as "Life Brand". This can be a daunting task, and "gluten free" and "wheat free" are not the same thing. Some of the things that I learned in this rather massive undertaking include the rule of "Pac Man". Companies are sometimes taken over by bigger companies and when this occurs their rules change. A company that at one time did not test on animals or use machines that were cleaned prior to using products claiming to be gluten free are now glibly adopting the "new bigger and better". I was shocked to find out that some of the containers from the smaller company were still being used after these PAC MAN take-overs, to save on manufacturing costs. And, remember, once several ingredients are combined the "organic" ingredient probably ceases to be "organic". Some women (and men, you are not exempt here) expect to pay a higher price for a luxury brand assuming that the gorgeous bottle of eye cream sold at Saks for $60.00 is going to work better than the $1.99 tube on the clearance rack of a local store. Just ensure the product has not reached its "sell by" date because it may all be psychological. What you have to concern yourself about, as a celiac patient or a person with dermatitis herpetiformis, is whether there is gluten or wheat in that product. Before you splurge on an expensive product take the time to compare it to a similar product from one of their sister brands. Usually an online store (like Drugstore.com) will list the ingredients. Or you can check on a site like "Makeup Alley" which is a great resource, offering numerous reviews and you can ask questions of the extremely knowledgeable posters on this message board. Another great resource is a large paperback book, titled "Do not go to the Drugstore Without Me" written by Paula Begoin. When I purchased the books in 2001 it was in its 5th Edition. NB: This is not a book specifically for celiac disease or dermatitis herpetiformis, but it was in this book that I found out about "Glutamic Acid". It is derived from wheat gluten and is an amino acid that can have water binding properties for the skin. It also explains glycerylesters that form a vast group of ingredients that are a mixture of fatty acids, sugars, and non-volatile alcohols. These fats and oils are used in cosmetics as emollients and lubricants as well as binding and thickening agents. At the back of this book is a list of the companies that do not test on animals and those that do, but again, the PAC MAN Rule applies. I purchased the book for myself, my daughter, and daughter-in-law, specifically because when my daughter was in her twenties she seemed to think she simply must buy her shampoo from the hairdresser because only $45.00 shampoo was good enough for her hair. It was a big eye opener when she moved out of home and had to purchase it herself! I believe that the more we know about beauty products and the beauty industry the wiser our purchases will be. Consider, for instance, the cost of research and development for say, L'Oreal who develop formulas that can be used in Garnier Shampoos ($3.99) and Kerastase shampoo ($29.99) It doesn't take long to realize that it is a good idea to compare products at different ends of the price scale. Sometimes, two products from two different brands will have the same patent number. The difference is in the non-active ingredients, which give it a unique texture, scent and/or color. Also, it is wise to photo-copy, and even apply plastic covering to lists of "safe" beauty products, just as it is wise to keep a copy of "safe" and "unsafe" foods on hand when you go shopping. When you cannot even pronounce some of the words used in foods and beauty products how can you be expected to remember what is safe to apply to your hair and skin? I received a very nice letter from Teresa Menna, Manager at L'Oreal in Quebec who told me that L'Oreal has abolished gluten in the composition of L'Oreal products. However, on reading more literature I find that Garnier is a mass market cosmetic brand of L'Oreal, and L'Oreal is part of the Group P&G. P&G stands for Proctor and Gamble and P&G Beauty brands can be found on the site:_ http://pgbeautygroomingscience.com/product.php {The Company Garnier Laboratories was started in 1906 and acquired by L'Oreal in the 1970's}. I was unaware prior to researching this article that L'Oreal owned Kerastase, or that L'Oreal had purchased the MAC Cosmetic line, or that the KAO Brands Company owns Ban, Biore, Jergens and John Frieda. Here are some of the ingredients you might find in cosmetics that could indicate wheat or gluten: Avena Sativa {Latin name of oat, or "oat" term containing ingredients Hordeum distichon {Latin name of barley, or "barley" term containing ingredients} Hydrolyzed malt extract Hydrolyzed wheat protein Hydrolyzed vegetable protein Wheat germ Vitamin E Cyclodextrin Barley extract Fermented grain extract Oat (Avena sativa) Samino peptide complex Secale Cereale (Latin name of rye, or "rye" term containing ingredients) Stearyldimoniumhydroxypropyl Phytosphingosine extract Triticum vulgare {Latin name of wheat, or "wheat" term containing ingredients} Dextrin Dextrin palmitate Maltodextrin Sodium C8-16 Isoalkylsuccinyl Wheat Protein Sulfonate Yeast extract Anything with wheat in the name Thoughts: Some cute person gave the warning to ensure your lipstick is gluten free even if you don't have any skin issues. You could swallow some lipstick and get gluten in your system! Another person adds at the bottom of their e-mail to be sure to check guidelines regularly because company policies can change yearly and the list is only to be considered as "guidelines" and make-up ingredients can change each time a company changes or the scientists within that company decide to add to or delete certain products. {Makes you feel very safe as a celiac/dermatitis herpetaformis person doesn't it?} Another e-mailer suggested that mascara labeled as a "thickening agent" should be fearfully evaluated by the celiac/dermatitis herpetaformis person because the thickening agent is often "flour" and can sometimes cause eyelashes to fall out! Who knew? Noted on one e-mail, ‘So-called luxury brands can be laden with synthetic ingredients that do not cost more than their not so luxurious counterparts. True natural products that do perform, and there are a few such brands on the market, are authentic natural products that actually deliver what they promise and they truly do cost more to make because raw ingredients are much higher in cost. In fact, the cost is significantly higher when pure high grade ingredients are used. Letter received: " We have compiled a list of gluten free beauty products available on sephora.com. These products do not contain any wheat, rye or barley derivatives, and they were made in gluten-free laboratories so there is no chance of cross-contamination. But since you cannot be too careful, discontinue use of any product that triggers an attack." Letter received from Clairol:- "Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye and barley. Although it is not added directly to our product, it may be present in fragrances. Due to the difficulty of tracing the source ingredients for the variety of fragrances used in manufacturing our products, we cannot provide specific levels of gluten content for any of our fragrance blends. Be aware that even products labeled "unscented" will still contain masking scent, therefore they may potentially contain gluten." Advertisement: World's Top Ten Cosmetic Companies : "Beauty begins on the inside, check out our post on ‘The Top Five Foods for Amazing Skin'" - Posted by The Greenster Team "I finally got up the nerve to go through my own (their) personal care products and look them up on "SKIN DEEP" and was very disappointed. The Company that makes my mascara (L'Oreal) tests on animals as does the company that makes my eyeliner (Covergirl) and my under eye concealer (Made by Physician's Formula) contains parabens" THE GREENSTER TEAM creates great articles, list the top ten cosmetic companies, what portion of the world's market they share and their hazard range. Letter received from Mabelline:- "Please find below most ingredients containing gluten (wheat and other grains). We invite you to take this list and compare it to our ingredient listings every time you buy a new product. When in doubt, do not hesitate to do your own research or contact your doctor." {Caveat Emptor} REMEMBER:- The truth is that there is no such thing as gluten free. The FDA has proposed a less than 20 ppm gluten -free standard in 2006. That was its first attempt to define the term gluten free, but the agency has yet to finalize it. The USDA is awaiting the FDA's decision before moving ahead. STILL WAITING. With the number of products making unregulated gluten free claims on the rise, the marketplace can be scary for consumers with gluten sensitivity and wheat allergies. Why hasn't the FDA finalized its 2006 definition of gluten free? As part of sweeping legislation known s FALCPA the Food Allergen Labelling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004, Congress ordered the FDA to define and permit the voluntary use of the term gluten free on the labeling of foods by August 2008. As directed, the FDA issued proposed gluten-free regulations on schedule but seems to have failed to follow through with a final ruling. There has been no explanation for the delay. Since the Cosmetic Industry is a self-regulating body it seems {appears, is assumed} that we the consumers are on our own as far as researching what goes on our skin and in our hair, because some of the letters I have received leave it to the celiac or dermatitis herpetiformis sufferer to research their own products. Even a letter from Avon states:- "Although Avon sells quality products, there is always possibility of contamination during manufacturing or changes/substitutions of ingredients. As with everything related to celiac disease, dermatitis herpetiformis and gluten Intolerance, products, ingredients and preparation may change over time. Your reactions to a specific product, ingredient may be different from the reactions of others. Like eating at a restaurant, you have to make a choice whether to consume/use a product. The list is meant to be a "guide" and does not guarantee that a product is 100% free of gluten. Dacia Lehman, Avon and GIG assume no responsibility for its use and any resulting liability or consequential damages is denied." LETTER: - Proctor and Gamble "The WHMIS rating is designed to rate raw materials and not formulated products such as ours. Nor are our consumer products required to be labeled under the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Hazard Communication Standard. Thus labelling of our products with WHMIS ratings or any other hazard rating should not be required by any state health and safety regulatory agencies." That letter is signed by Asela for the Pantene Team. LETTER:- May 2, 2012 - xyz@ca.loreal.com - "We have received your message and we will get back to you as soon as possible. Web Sites: Gluten-free Lifestyle: glutenfree-lifestyle.com (Gives gluten free products by type and by company) i.e.: deodorants, face & body wash, make-up, suntan lotion, toothpaste, moisturizer, lotion, shampoo & conditioner, shave cream, gels, after shave, laundry products, cleaners, soap, etc. Beauty Industry: Who Owns What? Glutino - Hidden Gluten in Health Products - Glutino & Gluten Free Pantry Blogs: www.gluten-free-cosmetic-counter.org Beauty Blogging Junkie Ebates Shopping Blog In The Makeup Lipstick Powder n'Paint Shop With a Vengeance Smarter Beauty Blog The Beauty Brains Sephora Sephora's iGoogle Beauty Portal References: Codex Standard for Foods for Special Dietary Use for Persons Intolerant to Gluten. Codex STAN 118 - 1979 ROME Government of Canada 2008 - Regulations Amending the Food and Drug Regulations (1220- Enhanced Labeling for Food Allergen and Gluten Sources and Added Sulphites) Health Canada 2007 - celiac disease and the Safety of Oats Labeling of Natural Health Products Containing Gluten - Health Canada Notice 2010
  5. Celiac.com 12/09/2011 - Gluten in lip, facial or other body products may be a threat to people with celiac disease, according to a new study. A research team from George Washington University evaluated products from the top ten American cosmetics companies. They found a troubling lack of information about product ingredients. Only two of the ten companies featured clear, detailed ingredients, and none of the companies offered products that were gluten-free. The study findings were revealed at the annual scientific meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology in Washington, D.C. The results are worrisome, because cosmetics that contain gluten can "result in an exacerbation of celiac disease," said researcher Dr. Pia Prakash. "This study revealed that information about the ingredients, including the potential gluten content, in cosmetics is not readily available." A number of smaller cosmetic companies produce gluten-free alternatives, said Prakash, who added that larger companies should take steps to inform consumers with gluten sensitivity whether their products are safe for those individuals. The study came about partly because doctors had seen a 28-year-old woman with celiac disease who suffered a worsening of symptoms, including gastrointestinal complications and a skin rash, after she used a "natural" body lotion. The doctors and the woman had a hard time trying to figure out if the lotion contained gluten. However, Prakash said, "…once she stopped using the body lotion her symptoms resolved." Such cases highlight the huge challenge faced by people with celiac disease in trying to determine if their cosmetic products contain gluten. Because the results of the study were presented at a medical meeting, the data and conclusions should be considered preliminary until peer-reviewed and published in a medical journal. Source: http://www.newsday.com/news/health/gluten-in-cosmetics-threaten-those-with-celiac-disease-1.3288992
  6. Ok, While I do not wear make up a lot, mostly in the past just didn't feel like fooling with it, however on occasion when I want to look nice, I will put some on. With that said, with what little dab of goodies I had , it wound up in the garbage. Some requirements I do have for new make up brands is 1) It must be gluten-free, 2) vegetarian friendly. If anyone knows of a good brand that would helpful. This brings me to another question related, but don't see a need to make a separate post. In the past I was a huge fan of Aveda, I loved their products but upon inquiring the salon told me while they are plant based, they do often contain gluten, and wasn't the most helpful on which ones did not. The receptionist did state there was a couple but didn't know which they was. That for me isn't really good enough, so I am on a mission to find a new hair salon in the New orleans area, or in Baton Rouge that does offer gluten-free hair care and uses them during hair cuts. As always thank you for the help, Serielda
  7. I recently discovered I am not only gluten intolerant, but also dairy as well. The dairy seems to have played a huge role in my acne problem. I'm much clearer than I have ever been and I'd like to keep it that way. I'm looking for a drugstore primer that is free of gluten as to keep from swelling and maybe ultimately reduce inflammation. Any help would be much appreciated, I've tried to research and contact reps, but no one seems to have an answer.
  8. This is my first post, so please forgive me if I'm in the wrong spot. I've searched extensively and have not been able to find and answer so I'm hopeful that this isn't a repeat question! I was diagnosed with Celiac seven years ago and have been careful to stick to my gluten-free diet throughout that time. My symptoms at the time of diagnosis were all stomach/gastro related, and I had bouts of skin problems growing up as well. I am lucky to have minimal gastro issues now, but the past 12-18 months I've been suffering from a lot of mental health & skin issues. I have been on and off antidepressants in the past, so I never really considered the two could be related until a few months ago, when I was given a gluten filled roll by mistake. I was so depressed I couldn't get out of bed or stop crying and it set off a lightbulb for me. I've ALWAYS been plagued by the brain fog which I attritbuted to too much/too little sleep. I have also been struggling with a reocurring patchy rash/eczema type thing on my lips and chin. I have been extremely careful lately, using only gluten free lotions, shampoo, facewash, toothpaste, etc. I have been feeling a lot better and the rash was going away until this morning. I tried to think of what I did yesterday differently and there are two possibilities. 1. I took my generic klonopin. It's called Clonazepam and the manufacturer is Teva Generics. I can't find it on any gluten free lists, and on their website they so helpfully guide patients to not take the drug if they are allergic to any ingredients, but don't list the actual ingredients. Perfect. I tried to call, but since it's the hoildays their office has been closed. Has anyone had any experience with this particular make? 2. I wore a little bit of makeup yesterday. I have thoroughly checked all of my makeup and gotten rid of anything obvious (the mascara I've been using for YEARS has wheat in it. Whoops.) but most of my makeup does have tocopheryl acetate which I'm learning COULD be an issue. I am using Laura Mercier tinted moisturizer and Tarte concealer. I've read conflicting reviews online (Tarte is gluten free! No, it's not! Etc.) Honestly, I'm at a complete loss. My pharmacy knows I have Celiac and I often ask about gluten content in medications when they're knew so I'm going to be really pissed if they're just ignoring this while dolling out drugs. I'm also very into makeup, and having to switch to entirely all natural brands is going to be really depressing for me, and I'd love to avoid it if possible. So basically this is a long winded rant/complaint combined with a question: does anyone have any insight on gluten in generic Clonazepam and or/ the two makeup items listed above? Thank you so much in advance.
  9. I emailed Merle Norman for a gluten free product list and they promptly sent me one! I saw another Merle Norman gluten-free list on this site but it was from 2009. This one was updated on 12/31/13. Enjoy! GLUTEN FREE PRODUCT 5-MINUTE HYDRATING FACIAL GEL AGE DEFYING+ LIPCOLOR AGE DEFYING EYELINER AGE DEFYING LIPCOLOR AGE DEFYING SERUM AHA INTENSIVE COMPLEX AHA TONER NORMAL/DRY AHA TONER NORMAL/OILY ANTI-REDNESS FOAMING CLEANSER AQUA BALANCE MAKEUP AQUA-LUBE CREAM AUTOMATIC EYELINER AUTOMATIC FINE BROW PENCIL AUTOMATIC LIP PENCIL PLUS BLUSH ROUGE BRILLIANT-C BRIGHTENING SERUM BRILLIANT-C CLEANSER BRILLIANT-C EYE CREAM BRILLIANT-C MOISTURIZER BRILLIANT-C NECK & CHEST CREAM BRILLIANT-C TONER BRONZING POWDER BROW SEALER CLARIFYING CLAY MASK CLEANSING CREAM CLEANSING LOTION CLEAR COMPLEXION GEL CLEANSER CLEAR COMPLEXION MOISTURIZER CLEAR COMPLEXION SPOT TREATMENT CLEAR COMPLEXION TONER COLOR MAX SHADOW COVER UP CREAMY CONCEALER CREAMY FLO-MATIC MASCARA CREME-TO-POWDER BLUSH DAILY MOISTURE CREAM DAILY MOISTURE TONER DAY CREME WITH HC-12 DEFINITIVE BROW PENCIL DUAL ACTION CONCEALER Page 1 of 4 12/13/2013 GLUTEN FREE PRODUCT DUAL ACTION EYE MAKEUP REMOVER ENERGIZING CONCENTRATE EXPERT FINISH MAKEUP BROAD SPECTRUM SPF 25 EXPERT TOUCH FINISHING SPRAY EYE SHADOW (MATTE, LUMINOUS, SEMI-MATTE) EYE SHADOW BASE FACIAL CLEANSING WIPES FINE LINE MINIMIZER FLAWLESS EFFECT LIQUID FOUNDATION BROAD SPECTRUM SPF 15 FLAWLESS EFFECT LOOSE & PRESSED POWDER FLAWLESS EFFECT OIL CONTROL PRESSED POWDER FOAMING CLEANSER NORMAL/DRY FOAMING CLEANSER NORMAL/OILY FOUNDATION PRIMER FOUNDATION PRIMER PLUS SPF 15 FRESH 'N FAIR GENTLE POLISH HEX ROLL-ON DEODORANT HUSSY BODY CREAM INNER EYELINER INSPIRATIONS BODY CREAM INSPIRATIONS BODY WASH INTENSIVE MOISTURIZER LASH LIFT WATERPROOF MASCARA LASTING CHEEKCOLOR LASTING CREAM EYESHADOW LASTING CREME EYELINER LASTING FOUNDATION SPF 12 LIP EXFOLIATOR LIP GLAZE LIP PENCIL LIP PENCIL PLUS LIP POLISH LIP REVIVE LIQUID MAKEUP BROAD SPECTRUM SPF 16 LIQUID SHIMMER LONG WEAR LIPCOLOR MATTE OIL-FREE MOISTURIZER MICRO-REFINER MIRACOL BOOSTER Page 2 of 4 12/13/2013 GLUTEN FREE PRODUCT MIRACOL REVITALIZING CREAM MIRACOL REVITALIZING LOTION MN FOR MEN CLEANSER MN FOR MEN MOISTURIZER MN FOR MEN POST-SHAVE BALM MOIST LIP COLOR MOISTURE EMULSION MOISTURE LOTION MOISTURE RICH FACIAL TREATMENT MOISTURE WORKS NATURAL BROW POWDER NATURAL BROW WAX NATURAL BROWN SHADOW NIGHTTIME RECOVERY CREME OIL BLOTTERS PERFECTING MAKEUP BROAD SPECTRUM SPF 25 POLISHED PERFECTION POWDER BASE FOUNDATION POWDER BROW PENCIL PREVENTAGE FIRMING DEFENSE CREME NORMAL/DRY BROAD SPECTRUM - NEW PREVENTAGE FIRMING DEFENSE CREME NORMAL/OILY BROAD SPECTRUM - NEW PREVENTAGE HAND TREATMENT PREVENTAGE HAND TREATMENT BROAD SPECTRUM SPF 15 - NEW PRO PEN EYELINER PURELY MINERAL CHEEKS PURELY MINERAL EYE PENCIL PURELY MINERAL HIGHLIGHTER PURELY MINERAL MAKEUP PURELY MINERAL PRESSED MAKEUP REFINING LOTION RENEW REVITALIZING EYE GEL SHEER DEFENSE TINTED MOISTURIZER BROAD SPECTRUM SPF 15 SHEER FACE POWDER SKIN REFINING CLEANSER SMART FINISH COMPACT MAKEUP SPF18 SOFT TOUCH EYE PENCIL SUPER-LUBE MOISTURIZER SUPREME LASH MASCARA Page 3 of 4 12/13/2013 GLUTEN FREE PRODUCT TIMELESS AGE-DEFYING MAKEUP BROAD SPECTRUM SPF 20 TOTAL FINISH COMPACT MAKEUP ULTIMATE FIRMING NECK CREAM ULTRA FOUNDATION WITH HC-12 ULTRA LIGHT SUNSCREEN BROAD SPECTRUM SPF 50 ULTRA LIP SHINE ULTRA POWDER FOUNDATION ULTRA RICH HAND CREAM ULTRA THICK MASCARA VERY GENTLE EYE MAKEUP REMOVER WARM BLUSH WICKED LASH MASCARA WRINKLE SMOOTHER WRINKLE SMOOTHER EYE WRINKLE SMOOTHER LIFT & FIRM SERUM WRINKLE SMOOTHER LIPS XTRA LENGTH MASCARA
  10. Someone asked a few months ago if Red Apple sold any samples. Well, now they do! You can make up your own sample set! Here's the link. http://www.redapplelipstick.com/samples
  11. Finding affordable, gluten-free skin care products can be a chore. But, thanks to Joelle's Cosmetics' one-stop gluten-free skin care shop, the world of cosmetics has been revolutionized, and shopping for gorgeous gluten-free make-up has never been easier or more affordable. There are just too many amazing products, so I'm not sure where to start! Joelle's 14-Piece Deluxe Gluten-Free Make-up Kit is a perfect starter kit. It comes equipped with everything; including a stylish, self-contained organizer with interior zipper pouches (perfect for travel), a 7-piece professional vegan brush set with luxuriously soft brushes, and dazzling mineral make-up including: silky foundations (liquid or mineral), glamorous mineral eye colors and satiny finishing powders. I've looked everywhere for gluten-free liquid foundation, so when I found out that Joelle's makes it I was so excited, and I was not disappointed. When I finished my home make-over, using Joelle's step by step instructions for professional mineral application, I really looked like a new, improved me! Any unwanted blemishes and lines disappeared with the final stroke of the mineral veil and I was left with soft, flawless skin and gorgeous all-day coverage. For more information on Joelle's gluten-free makeup & other skin care products go to: http://www.mymineralglitters.com/joellecosmetics.html Note: Articles that appearin the "Gluten-Free Product Reviews" section of this site are paid advertisements. For more information about this seeour Advertising Page.
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