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Found 40 results

  1. Celiac.com 10/31/2018 - It’s official. Twitter official. Kourtney Kardashian has made peace with wheat and dairy, and called off her highly touted gluten-free, dairy-free diet. After several years of avoiding them like the plague, the celebrity is now on good terms with both gluten and dairy and is ready to accept them back into her diet. In a new post on her website, the ever busy Kardashian says she’s relaxing a bit, and allowing for dietary deviation and occasional indulgences "in moderation." Kardashian and gluten are not exactly new besties. For now, Kardashian says, she plans to remain gluten-free and dairy-free at home, but more flexible when traveling and dining out. "Lately, I've been less strict about avoiding gluten and dairy…Everything in my pantry is still free of dairy and gluten, so when I'm at home, it's still how I eat," she writes. "But when I go out, or have a craving, I'll have whatever I want. I try to do everything in moderation in my usual routine." In addition Kardashian noted recently on her website that, in addition to a few choice supplements, she usually starts her day with “one tablespoon of organic apple cider vinegar mixed into a glass of water." Can’t get enough? Follow Kourtney Kardashian on Twitter: @kourtneykardash
  2. I’m new to all this Celiac and gluten free stuff so I apologize if I come off as ignorant. I’ve been to two Gastroenterologists are both have told me that my Gluten issues where not Celiac, I do get stomache cramps when I eat gluten, and if I eat gluten consistently I suddenly become allergic to my cat! Still, my symptoms are nothing compared to the pain that diagnosed Celiacs have described. I’ve taken the blood test to see if I am Celiac, and it came back negative. But Ever since my Gluten issues came about (stomach pain constantly, skin issues, other allergies) so have my diary issues. If I eat Dairy I either get constipation or diarrhea, and if I continue it for a few days I get minimal rectal bleeding, which is a little scary. This is definitely a symptom of dairy intolerance and not gluten intolerance right? I asked the Gastroenterologist about it, and they said it’s most likely just IBS. She said I’m too young for a lot of gastrointestinal issues (I’m 22, in good health). She also said rectal bleeding is really only a concern if it’s enough to fill up a toilet bowl, and mine is only when I wipe, while obviously eating dairy (or maybe gluten? I’m not sure). Has anyone experienced anything like this? I want to get a Colonoscopy at some point, although my Doctor told me I don’t really need too. But rectal bleeding is pretty scary for me.
  3. Hello all, So, long story short, in 2011 I started getting really really sick, with no discernible cause. Violent vomiting daily, rapid weight gain (40 pounds in one month) unbelievable exhaustion, depression, social anxiety to the point of not being able to leave the house, hives, acne, rashes, brain fog, and my LEAST favorite, the all-over bruised body feeling you get when you have the flu (that horrible bone deep aching that makes it uncomfortable to move at all, and any clothing touching you hurts.) Oh, and monstrous swelling of my face and stomach. I wound up figuring out through elimination of certain things in my diet that what was doing it was gluten and dairy. So, over the years I've cut them out (at first, after I cut them out, I was still getting horrendously sick, just less often and it took me too long to realize CROSS CONTAMINATION WAS A THING) So fast forward to now, I'm able to function like a human again by being INCREDIBLY strict with my diet and making almost all of my food myself and NEVER taking any chances with anything that was "processed in the same facility with..." etc etc I've also recently started going back to school, which means I have to be EXTRA careful, or I won't be able to attend classes or study because my brain, and my body just don't function when I've been exposed. However, I've always been a do it yourself girl, so after having endoscopies and colonoscopies years ago, and having a doctor tell me I had "acid reflux" (way to diagnose the symptom, not the cause, ya jerk) and having no doctors know why I was getting so sick, and eventually figuring it out myself, I never was tested for Celiac's Disease. So obviously, I'm scarred for life, and terrified to death of gluten and I was wondering; does anyone know of some way that I could be tested for it WITHOUT exposing myself to it? Thank you so much in advance
  4. I'm new here, so I'm not sure if I'm even posting this in the right forum, but here goes. It's been about 3 months and I am at my wit's end. Forgive me for being dramatic, but I don't wanna suffer alone anymore. My gluten intolerance emerged when I hit puberty, but it was never serious: just bloating, constipation, fatigue. However, along the years, I noticed some strange symptoms come about. The weirdest being a "globus" sensation, as if something was caught in my throat. After attempting to cough it up to no avail, I decided to ignore it, assuming it was simply mucus. Once again, I continued to eat gluten, not realizing the damage it was causing. Then slowly over the course of a couple more years, I noticed that food would take awhile to go down. I didn't think much of it, just that I had to drink a lot more water than usual. Fast forward to the present time, and now I can hardly swallow my own saliva. I went to the doctor, who said I had nothing more than a mere chest cold. So I took the medicine, and only got worse. I don't know how it happened, but I stumbled upon a forum post, about a woman whose dysphagia was linked to celiac disease. It all makes sense now. After a month of starvation, my swallowing returned to (somewhat) normal, and as you can imagine, I stuffed every food imaginable down my throat: pizza, bread, ramen, my favorite foods basically. And now I'm back to step one, and I've never felt more miserable. I've avoided gluten like the plague ever since, yet I still cannot swallow. I really hope that someone out there can relate to the toll that this is taking on my mental health. I've never been suicidal, but it just seems like each day, a new symptom arises for no utter reason, and I think that being dead would be so much easier. As of now, I haven't eaten gluten in weeks, yet I have the sensation of a walnut stuck in my throat, and I am scared to death to eat a morsel of mashed potato. I've been waking up every morning choking on my saliva. No one is taking me seriously. My mom just tells me to eat less dairy and gluten. But my throat literally feels like it's the size of a straw. That's not all either. Don't even get me started on the brain fog, the random rashes, my bones aching for no reason, falling asleep while eating, the list goes on. I've managed to eat some soup now, although it takes me an hour to eat half a cup. This, along with the stress of college is beating me to a pulp right now. I hate to complain so much, but I really just want someone to tell me that they know what I'm going through, because no one in my life can relate to me right now, or even have any sympathy. Please, tell me I'm not alone.
  5. Hello! I am on week 3 of being gluten free and dairy free. I noticed I had a bit more energy. But other than that I haven't noticed any change in my keratosis pilaris, my main reason for changing my diet. For those of you who saw a change in your skin after going gluten-free, how long did it take? Also- I've heard of other foods that can cause KP, but trying a diet that would eliminate all of those possible sensitivities and reintroducing them sounds tough. I'd have to forego gluten, dairy, nightshades, sugar, eggs, legumes, grains, corn, nuts, and high glycemic fruits. That's great and all, but what would I have left to eat? Broccoli and dirt??
  6. I have very slowly come to the conclusion that I have a problem with casein. This is despite being years into the gluten free life and having mostly avoided dairy for a long time. I say mostly because although I would never have had milk in a coffee or with cereal etc. I didn't worry too much if milk was listed in the ingredients of some gluten free processed treat or deny myself the odd milk chocolate if there was one handy. After all my reasoning would go, I deserve it for eschewing all the nice gluten things... I also hadn't given milk too much thought. I think I just thought I was probably lactose intolerant like my father. However although last time I had a fair amount of milk I got the lactose intolerance stomach signs I also got spots on my chest and back a couple of days later. I think, don't know, but think, my issues with dairy may extend to the casein protein rather than just the lactose. Well I've now had enough of my skin issues which I think are strongly linked to milk so I'm now on a new quest to try and remove dairy completely and finding it a little bit of a struggle. I hadn't realised how many of the nice gluten-free foods also contain milk. So I wondered how strict I have to be where casein is concerned. If you have an issue with it and avoid it, do you have to treat it in the same way you would gluten? Is a tiny amount in processed food enough for you to react? Should I get rid of any biscuits etc I have in which have milk listed as an ingredient? Does it matter if the ingredient is butter which I understand to have much lower casein content? What's the deal with casein?
  7. Hi Everyone, I would like to move somewhere in Central/South America to study Spanish for a few months but am concerned about food availability, allergy awareness and ingredients used at restaurants. I get sick when I eat Gluten, Dairy, Corn, Soy, and a few others but those are the worst ones for me. I usually eat meat, rice (as my grain source), potatoes, and fruit/vegetables. I'm concerned about being able to eat out at restaurants and shopping for food. Even in the USA, gluten free can be a challenge if one cannot eat corn, which is the most common substitute. Does anyone know which Latin American country will be easiest to manage? Right now I'm thinking that learning Spanish in Spain might be my best bet but I really want to go to Latin America. There was a similar post in 2010 (only for gluten), but now it's 6-7 years later so I'm bringing the topic back again because times change fast in the allergy world. Thanks so much for your help, Ori
  8. Hi guys! I'm Allie, was diagnosed about two weeks ago. I've been receiving some conflicting advice about whether or not to continue consuming dairy, on all the blog posts I have read and general internet research, everyone says to avoid or lessen dairy intake until you are healed, which means been gluten free for about 12-18 months. But my dietitian who I recently started working with, who has been working with celiacs for 15 years, says that if I lessen my dairy intake I'm not only depriving myself of calcium but putting myself at risk for becoming lactose intolerant. Which I definitely do not want... However I do notice that recently (not sure if this is after I eat dairy or not) my stomach makes some odd rumbling noises... Thoughts?
  9. A few months before my 22nd birthday and college graduation (late March), I started noticing daily GI issues including gas, bloating and diarrhea . I passed most of this off on the quality of the food at my school's dining hall, but once I moved out, the symptoms did not cease. In April, I went in to see the school nurse for a UTI, and as part of standard procedure, they sent the test offsite for further analysis. Later that week I received an email from the Nurse Practitioner that I had also tested positive for E. Coli, but the MacroBid I had been prescribed for the UTI should also work on the E. Coli. (Maybe of note, I was in Belize, Mexico, and Honduras for a week in early March). Took the antibiotics, and symptoms did not resolve. After graduation, I went on the Whole 30 diet to cut out soy, grains (including gluten), and dairy (I have been mildly lactose-intolerant for over a decade). My symptoms almost all but disappeared. After, I went back to eating indiscriminately, and my GI issues seemed to worsen exponentially. In July, I went to my GP and ended up doing a stool sample so she could have me tested again for E. Coli, but the test was negative. I have tried for the most part to cut gluten and dairy from my diet, but now even other grains, such as rice, give me problems where I had none in the past. Garlic is also a new problem, and has my gut feel like a gurgling hot tub. Just this past week (Mid-September), chicken pan-fried in coconut oil (with which I cooked during the Whole 30 program without issue) seems to have me running to the bathroom about 30-60 min after consumption. In the past month, eggs are giving me trouble as well. I'm scheduled to see a GI in DC in October, but looking for relief and advice in the mean time. My symptoms range from gas to diarrhea to abdominal pain, but have never included constipation. (Maybe of note, I had a strange rash on my nose that took several week to heal recently, closely resembled rug-burn, scabbing, and neosporin seemed to help a bit, but its still not back to normal). Any advice would be very welcome!
  10. I've had a range of symptoms in the last 2 months and in the past few weeks I have discovered that my TTG abs (igA) levels were 41 (my igA tests were fine). The doctor said that he is pretty much certain that it is celiac disease and I am awaiting an endoscopy to confirm it. Before I found out that my TTG abs (igA) levels were high, I noticed that my body was reacting really badly to dairy products. I went on an elimination diet and stopped all gluten and dairy products and felt much better. I carried this on after my results and thought that I must have developed a dairy intolerance due to my celiac. 2 days ago I accidentally consumed a glass of wine which I thought was dairy free but it contained Milk. I have not had any gluten. I am currently in the middle of a flare up. All of a sudden rashes have started to appear on my hands and my anxiety has returned (usually not a anxious person). No diarhhoea, vomiting or digestive issues. I am currently suffering from muscle twitching, rashes predominantly on hands and feet, brain fog, pins and needles/numbness on hands, feet and arms. However, I have been tested for milk allergy and this came back negative. Is it possible that it is dairy that is causing my symptoms/autoimmune reaction and could this be a reason for elevetated TTG abs (igA) levels. Or has the doctor only picked up my celiac and missing something else. If it was dairy intolerance then I would have digestive issues but I don't seem to have any. Could it be the casein protein? Anyone been in a similar situation or can anyone provide some insight?
  11. I was diagnosed with Celiac disease a little over a year ago and have been gluten free since. I feel so much better now that I have been gluten free. However, I still have been having some issues particularly with acne, lethargy, and chronic congestion/post nasal drip. After talking with my doctor and reading multiple forums I have decided to eliminate dairy from my diet to see if I may be intolerant to it. I am wondering how long I should do this before I might expect results/decide if it's not working?
  12. Hi everyone, I'm a recently diagnosed ceoliac. I'm 25 (female), and I've been free from gluten and dairy for 4 days and yesterday the pains from withdrawal hit me - aching joints, sharp pains, foggy mind, etc. Yet yesterday night my stomach felt good and unbloated for the first time in so long. Today, however, I've woken with a tender lower stomach and swollen legs that have increased as the day progressed - swollen legs having been a nightmare for me throughout this entire time. My hands are also prone to swelling and I get bad water retention. My upper stomach isn't TOO bad. I'm still feeling constipated, too, which isn't helping. How long do these withdrawals last? Does anyone know how to overcome them or at least ease them? Especially the leg swelling - I work on my feet all day so it's hard. Did anyone else suffer from the leg swelling? I feel really lost and confused because no doctor has given me any guidance other than "don't eat gluten and dairy". Please help! I feel so out of control and low!
  13. Would hot yoga help the puffiness in face due to other food sensitivities? or Asuanas? How to determine if you have a histamine intolerance or other food sensitivities?
  14. being new to this, I have started avoiding gluten and dairy. I seem to be sensitive to other foods like corn, tomatoes, bananas, and possibly grains and sugars. I still get puffy in the face whenever I eat certain things. other than blood testing, does any meds help with this? Also, is gas X gel tablets ultra strength gluten free?
  15. I'm sure this has been covered here but I'm not debating the theory... more just looking for your personal experiences ! I started eating dairy again recently and am thrilled that yoghurt and probably cheese have no ill effect. I even got up the guts (ha) to start drinking coffee at the local coffee shop...WITH MILK. As in... not even fermented. JUST MILK. At first I had Lacteese to cover my bases/break associations... and after a few days I didn't take it and... STILL NOTHING. Success! Repeated every day for about 6 days. Lactose and I are buds. But. Yesterday I got coffee from somewhere else and had the same old dairy symptoms (I think).... and it could be due to the heat wave that hatched here or hormones (that time of the month) so I'm not jumping to conclusions but I did just find out upon returning to local cafe that they use Jersey milk... Seems unlikely to be the cause though because I don't think cheese was bad and that's still got protein in it... unlike icecream which also had a1 milk and was ok... Are you a celiac who struggles with dairy but tolerates a2? Or?
  16. Approximately 70% of all American calories come from a combination of the following four foods: wheat, dairy, soy and corn - assuming, that is, we exclude calories from sugar. Were it true that these four foods were health promoting, whole-wheat-bread-munching, soy-milk-guzzling, cheese-nibbling, corn-chip having Americans would probably be experiencing exemplary health among the world's nations. To the contrary, despite the massive amount of calories ingested from these purported "health foods," we are perhaps the most malnourished and sickest people on the planet today. The average American adult is on 12 prescribed medications, demonstrating just how diseased, or for that matter, brainwashed and manipulated, we are. How could this be? After all, doesn't the USDA Food Pyramid emphasize whole grains like wheat above all other food categories, and isn’t dairy so indispensible to our health that it is afforded a category all of its own? Unfortunately these “authoritative” recommendations go much further in serving the special interests of the industries that produce these commodities than in serving the biological needs of those who are told it would be beneficial to consume them. After all, grains themselves have only been consumed for 500 generations – that is, only since the transition out of the Paleolithic into the Neolithic era approximately 10,000 years ago. Since the advent of homo sapiens 2.5 million years ago our bodies have survived on a hunter and gatherer diet, where foods were consumed in whole form, and raw! Corn, Soy and Cow's Milk have only just been introduced into our diet, and therefore are “experimental” food sources which given the presence of toxic lectins, endocrine disruptors, anti-nutrients, enzyme inhibitors, indigestible gluey proteins, etc, don’t appear to make much biological sense to consume in large quantities - and perhaps, as is my belief, given their deleterious effects on health, they should not be consumed at all. Even if our belief system doesn’t allow for the concept of evolution, or that our present existence is borne on vast stretches of biological time, we need only consider the undeniable fact that these four “health foods” are also sources for industrial adhesives, in order to see how big a problem they present. For one, wheat flour is used to make glues for book binding and wall-papering, as well as being the key ingredient for paper mache mortar. Sticky soy protein has replaced the need for formaldehyde based adhesives for making plywood, and is used to make plastic, composite and many other things you probably wouldn’t consider eating. The whitish protein known as casein in cow's milk is the active ingredient in Elmer's glue and has been used for paint since ancient times. Finally, corn gluten is used as a glue to hold cardboard boxes together. Eating glue doesn't sound too appetizing does it? Indeed, when you consider what these sticky glycoproteins will do to the delicate microvilli inside our intestines, a scenario, nightmarish in proportions, unfolds. All nutrients are absorbed in the intestine through the microvilli. These finger-like projections from off the surface of the intestine amplify the surface area of absorption in the intestine to the area the size of a tennis court. When coated with undigested or partially digested glue (glycoproteins), not only is the absorption of nutrients reduced leading to malabsorption and consequently malnourishment, but the villi themselves become damaged/dessicated/ inflammed and begin to undergo atrophy - at times even breaking off. The damage to the intestinal membrane caused by these glues ultimately leads to perforation of the one cell thick intestinal wall, often leading to "leaky gut syndrome": a condition where undigested proteins and plant toxins called lectins enter the bloodstream wreaking havoc on the immune system. A massive amount of research (which is given little to no attention both in the mass media and allopathic medicine) indicates that diseases as varied as fibromyalgia, diabetes, autism, cancer, arthritis, crohn's, chronic fatigue, artheroscerosis, and many others, are directly influenced by the immune mediated responses wheat, dairy, soy and corn can provoke. Of all four suspect foods Wheat, whose omnipresence in the S.A.D or Standard American Diet indicates something of an obsession, may be the primary culprit. According to Clinical Pathologist Carolyn Pierini the wheat lectin called "gliadin" is known to to participate in activating NF kappa beta proteins which are involved in every acute and chronic inflammatory disorder including neurodegenerative disease, inflammatory bowel disease, infectious and autoimmune diseases. In support of this indictment of Wheat’s credibility as a “health food,” Glucosamine – the blockbuster supplement for arthritis and joint problems – has been shown to bind to and deactivate the lectin in wheat that causes inflammation. It may just turn out to be true that millions of Americans who are finding relief with Glucosamine would benefit more directly from removing the wheat (and related allergens) from their diets rather than popping a multitude of natural and synthetic pills to cancel one of Wheat’s main toxic actions. Not only would they be freed up from taking supplements like Glucosamine, but many would also be able to avoid taking dangerous Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) like Tylenol, Aspirin and Ibuprofen, which are known to cause tens of thousands of cases of liver damage, internal hemorrhaging and stomach bleeding each and every year. One might wonder: “How is it that if America's favorite sources of calories: Wheat and Dairy, are so obviously pro-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, and generally toxic, why would anyone eat them?” ANSWER: They are powerful forms of socially sanctioned self-medication. Wheat and Dairy contain gliadorphin and gluten exorphins, and casomorphin, respectively. These partially digested proteins known as peptides act on the opioid receptors in the brain, generating a temporary euphoria or analgesic effect that has been clinically documented and measured in great detail. The Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology in Magdeburg, Germany has shown that a Casein (cow's milk protein) derivative has 1000 times greater antinociceptive activity (pain inhibition) than morphine. Not only do these morphine like substances create a painkilling "high," but they can invoke serious addictive/obsessive behavior, learning disabilities, autism, inability to focus, and other serious physical and mental handicaps. As the glues destroy the delicate surface of our intestines, we for the life of us can't understand why we are so drawn to consume these "comfort foods", heaping "drug soaked" helping after helping. Many of us struggle to shake ourselves out of our wheat and dairy induced stupor with stimulants like coffee, caffeinated soda and chocolate, creating a viscous “self-medicating” cycle of sedation and stimulation. As if this were not enough, Wheat, Dairy, and Soy also happen to have some of the highest naturally occurring concentrations of Glutamic Acid, which is the natural equivalent of monosodium glutamate. This excitotoxin gives these foods great "flavor" (or what the Japanese call umami) but can cause the neurons to fire to the point of death. It is no wonder that with all these drug-like qualities most Americans consume wheat and dairy in each and every meal of their day, for each and every day of their lives. Whether you now believe that removing Wheat, Dairy, Soy and Corn from your diet is a good idea, or still need convincing, it doesn’t hurt to take the “elimination diet” challenge. The real test is to eliminate these suspect foods for at least 2 weeks, see how you feel, and then if you aren’t feeling like you have made significant improvements in your health, reintroduce them and see what happens. Trust in your feelings, listen to your body, and you will move closer to what is healthy for you. This article owes much of its content and insight to the work of John Symes whose ground-breaking research on the dangers of wheat, dairy, corn and soy have been a great eye opener to me, and a continual source of inspiration in my goal of educating myself and others.
  17. Hi there, Hoping to get some thoughts from others out there who are familiar with the range of symptoms and issues associated with celiac disease (or gluten intolerance). My story is sad and complicated, but basically starts with the fact that I'm 26 and have had 5 early miscarriages in the past year. Testing was inconclusive, until finally my RE found that I have an autoimmune thyroid condition (anti-thyroid antibodies/hashimotos). He started me on a low dose of synthroid to boost me up (even though my current TSH is considered "normal". Anyways, in reading more about autoimmune thyroid conditions, I found out that they are highly related to celiac disease and that they can also respond to a gluten-free diet. So I decided to go gluten-free because, well, at this point I'm willing to try anything to be able to have a healthy baby. After doing all this reading, I've done done more reflecting and an convinced I have done kind of gluten intolerance issue. I did blood testing a couple of days after first deciding to try gluten-free, and the clinic said that should still be Ok for identifying the antibodies/tissue transglutaminase). I'll find out in January. Anyway, my symptoms include: - recurrent pregnancy loss (infertility) - thyroid autoimmunity - skin rashes (Not DH), possibly eczema or chronic hives - dairy intolerance developed in the last few years (this has *completely* improved since going gluten-free 2 weeks ago) - stomach gurgling, gas and bloating (also stopped on going gluten-free) - chronically loose, smelly stool (sorry TMI! But, my BMs have been completely normal on going gluten-free!) - grandmother recently told me my uncle "was celiac as a child but grew out if it" (right. ) It seems fairly compelling to ne, especially given my digestive improvements. I'm even thinking that if the blood test comes back negative, I might just stay gluten-free to see how it goes (with pregnancy, thyroid condition, digestive health, etc). What do you think? Thoughts, insights, or advice greatly appreciated! Thanks
  18. There was a documentary on netflix I watch I believe it was called "corn nation" something about corn. The guy showed how they have added the wheat gean to the corn as a way to make bugs not want to eat the corn.. He goes on to show an underground bunker where government has 1000's of varieties of corn stored in jars.. He asked the one in charge she said they new they (GMO companies) were modifying the gean or gen ( can't spell today) and they were protecting the original in case it made it uneatable and might pollinate other crops killing off corn.. He then went on talking about how even corn is feed to cattle because so many farmers started growing it.. That explains the dairy reactions too
  19. If I react subtly to trace amounts of dairy, does that mean I'd definitely have a bigger reaction to larger amounts of dairy? Or could I end up having the same subtle reaction regardless of the amount?
  20. Hey all, I've been diagnosed celiac for about a year, and until recently, was living fine with the gluten-free diet. About a month ago, I started noticing stomach aches after drinking breakfast shakes, and eating cheese. I found out that dairy intolerance often comes with celiac, which would have been fine as well, except around the same time I started having stomach/abdominal pain after eating almost anything. It started with gluten-free/DF homemade chili, then gluten-free chicken fried rice, and before I knew it I had to cut almost everything out of my diet. For the last 3-4 weeks I have been eating exclusively raw fruits/vegetables and poached chicken/turkey breast. Literally everything else that I've tried to reintroduce has given me abdominal pain. This includes all types of nuts, white rice, eggs, cod, salmon, peanut butter, even oven-roasted vegetables. I usually start feeling discomfort/tightness in my stomach around 30 seconds to a minute after eating any of these things. Despite eating 2 avocados and 1-2 chicken breasts a day, I'm not getting enough fat in my diet, and have lost about 15 pounds (down to around 120 lbs. as a 6', 21 year-old male). I recently spoke with my dietician who recommended that I start trying a low FODMAP elimination diet. Thankfully, most of the things I had to eliminate were things I already couldn't eat anyways. However, this limits my diet even further, and I can't even tolerate most of the things that are supposed to be okay to eat on this diet. I have noticed no improvement since starting this diet, which leads me to believe that there is something else going on. I have been taking multi-vitamins and probiotics daily for about three weeks but am currently losing hope, as none of my doctors/specialists have been able to give me a solid answer. The doctors that I have seen don't accept leaky guy as a legitimate medical condition and have sent me to a few different specialists instead, seeming generally clueless themselves. I am having a consultation for a colonoscopy soon, as well as for a cystoscopy (I apparently also have some sort of kidney/bladder blockage, maybe a stone. We're not sure if it's related to any of this yet). I have seen a naturopath and a dietician, but neither of what they've told me seem to be doing anything to solve the problem. I feel worse every day, low energy, irritability and a general feeling of tiredness are pretty much constant and it's becoming difficult to deal with school as well as other commitments. Does anyone have any insight as to what could be going on with my body, or at least some general advice on what to do in my situation? Let me know if you'd like any more information. Thanks for reading, and for any input you may have. Matt
  21. Hi, I have recently been having stomachaches after eating almost everything. I was wondering what was wrong so I went to the doctor today. I gave my doctor a food diary and she seemed to think it may be dairy and she said possibly Celiac but probably not because I had no symptoms after eating plain white rice. According to her white rice has gluten and that Is not true,right. Anyways so she ordered an x ray for me to check for constipation. I thought this was crazy because I have never had trouble "going". Surprisingly the x-Ray showed that there was a little backup. I know that constipation can also be a symptom of celiac so that also leads me to think its celiac. Anyways the doctor also ordered blood tests for celiac among many other things and I was told to stay off dairy until I get my test results. I think my issues with dairy may have to do with the damage celiac has done to my intestines. Anyways I'm jut looking for what you guys think of all this. Thanks, Stephanie
  22. I have been gluten free for about 6 weeks and I have noticed an improvement in my health (less bloating, less foggy, more energy) but am still having some issues. A brief history: I was vegan for 7 years until last July when due to loosing too much weight and the fact that I was finding eating anything difficult I went back to eating some dairy fat free cottage cheese and fat free yogurt. I have mild Gastroparesis and a esophageal motility disorder. My thinking is maybe the dairy is causing some issues. I still get some cramping and bloating after eating and wondered how commonly these 2 issues gluten intolerance and dairy intolerance are linked. I also seem to have a problem with corn and eggs and so already avoid those.
  23. Hello Everyone! So I am new too all of this and I'm not really sure where to start, so I'll give you a little background on me and how I got here and hopefully you kind people can give me suggestions! I am 32 years old and for YEARS, I mean YEARS (probably 20) I have been dealing with the most frustrating tummy issues. I would throw up nearly every day for what I thought was no reason, my weight fluctuated by the 10's on a monthly basis, severe cramps, bloating, bubbles... etc etc. I went to every doctor imaginable and spent thousands of dollars on tests, bloodwork, special foods, and procedures with everthing coming back 'normal' and 'within range.' It got to the point where my co-workers dubbed my illnesses as amyfowleritis. I felt for sure that I was dying some slow, painful death and some scientist would name my unknown issues after me and I would be in medical journals. Okay, so that is a bit of an exaggeration, but its how I honestly felt for a long, long time. On my birthday last month I decided I wanted shrimp and grits, one of God's finer creations, and I broke out in pretty impressive hives that three benadryl could not tackle and I was sent to the allergist to get an epipen. Only there, at the glorious allergist, did I learn that I not only had a shellfish allergy, but I also have a gluten and dairy intolerance, peanut allergy, and I should also be avoiding other nuts, citrus, mint, strawberries, chocolate, pork, and all salt-water fish. Needless to say, a giant light bulb went off over my head and I had a coming to Jesus moment once I realized that yes, this is why I feel like crap all the time. All of my favorite foods are torturing me and my GI system. I really wanted to go back and yell at all of the other doctors I have had the pleasure of knowing over the years for chaulking it up to severe IBS, but I decided to take the higher road and sulk in my own misery for the time being. My allergist appointment happened earlier this week (Monday, actually) and I am still in a shock type state of mind and I really do not have a clue as to where to begin. I am asking you, fellow gluten (and maybe other allergies like mine) suffers; where did you begin? Did you stop everything cold turkey like a bad drug? Did you start to ween yourself off the foods you cannot eat? How did you change your life and all of the eating habits you have had so long? What was the best piece of advice you received? As of right this second, I have a bag of gluten free pasta and veggies I can eat in my home. I cant really afford to replace everything in my pantry and fridge all at once, but I also dont want to starve myself. Anything, everything, whatever you have in your lovely brain of yours that you can share with me while I start this lifestyle change, I would truly and forever appreciate. I apologize for my novel, but I hope you made it through the end... or at least skimmed over it enough to pick up my cry for help. Thanks!!!!!
  24. Feeling a little overwhelmed and sorry for myself today. For the past 3 years I've been learning about my gluten intolerance. I am intolerant of gluten, soy, dairy, corn (and corn products such as vinegar and citric acid), gluten-free oats, quinoa and nightshades including tomato and potato. This even includes liquor like potato vodka. I know I'm SUPPOSED to be able to tolerate this....but I cant. So, basically, I've been strictly gluten free for about 1 1/2 years now. I have severe heart burn. Better with medication. Most of my gluten symptoms such as numb limbs, face, etc. and severe stomach upset and gas has gone away. Its magic as long as I stay away from gluten and the other offenders. At this point though I'm just angry. I smile and say its no big deal. I get by and there are lots of foods I can still eat. I put on a brave face most days. I am truly happy to have my health. I keep holding out hope that some of these multiple intolerances will go away as I get better but........ A part of me wants to say screw it, eat a bunch of gluten and call it a day. I get really frustrated and sick of being "ok" with it. Some days, it sucks! I hate that I can't go out to eat anywhere like every other normal person. I hate that people think I'm being picky. I hate the sympathy I get from decent people. Multiple intolerances SUCKKKKK! I also hate that sometimes I get sick from foods that AREN'T gluten. Not fair! It makes me so angry at my body. So, I just needed to b%$@# everyone. Needed to whine and throw a hissy fit! Thanks for listening!
  25. CaliSparrow

    How Long In The Penalty Box?

    3-12: I eat two slices of a three cheese gluten-free pizza. | | | ¥ 3-20/21: still paying for it daily with changing symptoms. Even things I normally eat hurt. Argh I feel like one of those squeeze toys where, when you squeeze the stomach, the eyes pop out. Never again cow dairy. In time, I'll have some goat yogurt but never again cow cheese. "Said the Raven...". 8-o Maybe it's stress compounding it too. The things I'm dealing with, worrying about. Who's stomach wouldn't be tied in knots? I heard my husband say I was managing an autoimmune condition. Manage is right, like managing a petulant little bull. Gosh, I was really doing well and had to start pushing... Really thought I could reintroduce some intolerant foods so that I could eat easier at a restaurant! What was I thinking? This must be one of those blessings in disguise. I can't afford to be glutened right now. Not going to eat in a restaurant now. Hmmm... Have to put my big girl pants on for several days of business/social gatherings around food. +energy! Yep. That'll be a lot. Good reason to rest up. Penalty box just transformed into solace. Tomorrow I sleep. Sleep and nourish.
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