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Found 3 results

  1. Celiac.com 01/19/2017 - A team of researchers recently set out to validate the celiac disease diagnoses recorded in the Danish National Patient Register. The research team included Stine Dydensborg, Dydensborg Sander, Ketil Størdal, Tine Plato Hansen, Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen, Joseph A Murray, Søren Thue Lillevang, and Steffen Husby. They are variously affiliated with the Hans Christian Andersen Children’s Hospital, Odense University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense Patient Data Explorative Network (OPEN), Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark; Mental and Physical Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Department of Pediatrics, Ostfold Hospital Trust, Fredrikstad, Norway; Department of Pathology, Hvidovre Hospital, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; Department of Clinical Immunology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. To validate the diagnoses, they used information on duodenal biopsies from a national register of pathology reports (the Patobank) and information on celiac disease-specific antibodies and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotypes obtained from patient medical records. Their study included all children born from 1995 to 2012 and registered as having celiac disease in the Danish National Patient Register. They reviewed all pathology reports on duodenal biopsies in the Patobank, along with medical record information on celiac disease-specific antibodies, such as anti-tissue transglutaminase 2 IgA and IgG, endomysial antibodies IgA, and anti-deamidated gliadin peptide IgG) and HLA genotypes. In the Danish National Patient Register, they found 2,247 children with celiac disease. Duodenal biopsies for 1,555 of the children (69%) were registered in the Patobank; 1,127 (50%) had biopsies consistent with celiac disease; i.e., Marsh 2–3. The team accessed the medical records of 95% of the children registered in the ­Danish National Patient Register with celiac disease. They found that 1,510 patients, or 67%, had one or more positive antibody-test results; 1,120, or 50% had anti-tissue transglutaminase 2 IgA ten times or more above the upper limit of the normal range and/or positive endomysial antibody results. The positive predictive value depended on the criteria used for validation and the types and numbers of registrations included in the analysis. Accordingly, the values ranged from 62% (95% confidence interval: 60%–64%) to 86% (95% confidence interval: 84%–87%). These findings indicate that the Danish National Patient Register is a valuable source to identify patients who have been diagnosed with celiac disease. However, they recommend that researchers validate and document diagnoses before using patient data for research purposes. Source: DovePress.com.
  2. Celiac.com 06/24/2015 - The Danish National Patient Registry records about 50 cases of celiac disease per 100,000 persons. This is much lower than the celiac rates reported in other Nordic countries, and many doctors have suspected that the condition is being under-diagnosed. So, how common is under-diagnosis of celiac disease? A team of researchers recently set out to answer that question by conducting a population-based study of Danish adults. The research team included A. Horwitz, T. Skaaby, L.L. Kårhus, P. Schwarz, T. Jørgensen, J.J. Rumessen, and A. Linneberg. They are affiliated with the Research Centre for Prevention and Health, The Capital Region at the University of Copenhagen in Copenhagen, Denmark. They screened a total of 2,297 adults aged 24-76 years living in the southwestern part of Copenhagen for celiac disease via immunoglobulin (Ig)A and IgG antibodies to transglutaminases and deamidated gliadin. They invited IgA/IgG-positive participants to a have a clinical evaluation, including biopsies, by a gastroenterologist. Of 56 invited participants, 40 underwent a full clinical evaluation, 8 of whom were diagnosed with celiac disease. Experts considered 2 of the 16 persons who declined the clinical evaluation to be likely positive for celiac disease. None of the above 56 participants had a known history of celiac disease or a recorded diagnosis of celiac disease in National Patient Registry. By combining the 8 cases of biopsy-proven celiac disease, the 2 cases of probable celiac disease, and 1 registry-recorded case of celiac disease, the team calculated 11 celiac cases out of 2,297 study participants. From this number, the team estimated celiac disease rates to be 479 per 100,000 persons, for the general population (95% CI: 197-761). This figure is 10 times higher than the registry-based prevalence of celiac disease. Of 11 participants diagnosed with celiac disease in our screening study, 10 were unaware of the diagnosis prior to the study. Thus, the team suggests that celiac disease is profoundly under-diagnosed in Danish adults. Source: Scand J Gastroenterol. 2015 Jul;50(7):824-31. doi: 10.3109/00365521.2015.101057.
  3. Ingredients: 1 tsp. apple cider vinegar 1/4 cup shortening (e.g. Earth Balance Shortening Sticks) 3 Tbs. honey or agave nectar 2 large eggs 2 1/4 tsp. rapid rise yeast 1 cup vanilla yogurt (dairy or non-dairy like soy, rice or coconut) 2 cups Jules Gluten Free All Purpose Flour 3 Tbs. flax seed meal (optional, but recommended) 1/2 tsp. baking soda 2 tsp. gluten-free baking powder Directions:In a large bowl, whisk together the dry ingredients, except yeast. Cut the shortening into small pieces and cut into the dry ingredients with a dough paddle attachment on an electric mixer, by hand using a pastry cutter, or in a large food processor. In a smaller bowl, stir together the liquid ingredients until combined. Slowly add liquid mixture to the dry ingredient bowl, mix with the paddle attachment and pour in the yeast, stirring until the lumps are removed from the dough. Beat an additional 2 minutes thereafter. Dust a clean counter or pastry mat and your hands with Jules Gluten Free All Purpose Flour. Grab small fist-fulls of the wet dough, patting into a 5 inch square by liberally dusting the dough and your hands with Jules Gluten Free All Purpose Flour . Lay the squares onto a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Using a pastry brush, lightly brush off excess flour. Makes approximately 7 danish squares. Cinnamon Apple Filling Ingredients: 3 tart apples, peeled and coarsely chopped ¼ cup light brown sugar 2 Tbs. butter or non-dairy alternative (e.g. Earth Balance Buttery Sticks) 1 Tbs. cinnamon Directions:Melt the butter in a skillet over medium heat. Add the brown sugar and cinnamon, stirring to combine. Add the apples and stir to coat with the sugar-butter mixture. Stir periodically to coat and keep cooking all the apples. Cook for 15-20 minutes, or until the sugar-butter mixture is thin and the apples are tender. Set aside to cool. Cream Cheese Filling Ingredients: 1 recipe danish dough 12 oz. cream cheese (dairy or soy) ¾ cup granulated cane sugar 1 egg yolk 1 tsp. gluten-free vanilla extract Directions:Whisk together cream cheese, sugar, egg yolk and vanilla. Place in a sealed container and refrigerate or freeze until thick. Gluten-Free PastriesPinwheels: Using a pizza cutter or pastry wheel, cut a slit from each of the 4 corners almost to the center, but not intersecting or cutting through the center. Place a dollop of cheese or cinnamon apples in the center and brush the remaining exposed pastry with egg wash. Fold every other tip into the center, and dab each corner with milk or water to help them to adhere to one another. Gently lift to the baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Cover the baking sheet with oiled wax paper and place in a warming drawer or oven preheated to 200 F then turned off for 30 minutes to proof.Preheat oven to 350 F (static) or 325 F (convection). Remove the wax paper and bake for approximately 15 minutes, or until lightly browned and resistant to a light touch (i.e. when pressed with a gentle fingertip, it rebounds rather than leaving a divot). Envelopes: Place a dollop of cheese or cinnamon apples in the center and brush the remaining exposed pastry with egg wash. Fold each opposite corner into the center, and dab each corner with milk or water to help them to adhere to one another. Gently lift to the baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Cover the baking sheet with oiled wax paper and place in a warming drawer or oven preheated to 200 F then turned off for 30 minutes to proof. Preheat oven to 350 F (static) or 325 F (convection). Remove the wax paper and bake for approximately 15 minutes, or until lightly browned and resistant to a light touch (i.e. when pressed with a gentle fingertip, it rebounds rather than leaving a divot). Blanket: Turn the square so that it is a triangle with a tip at the top and bottom. Place an elongated dollop of cheese or cinnamon apples in the center and extend to the top and bottom corners, leaving the right and left corners without filling, and brush the remaining exposed pastry with egg wash. Fold the right and left corners into the center, and dab each corner with milk or water to help them to adhere to one another. Gently lift to the baking sheet lined with parchment paper. OCover the baking sheet with oiled wax paper and place in a warming drawer or oven preheated to 200 F then turned off for 30 minutes to proof. Preheat oven to 350 F (static) or 325 F (convection). Remove the wax paper and bake for approximately 15 minutes, or until lightly browned and resistant to a light touch (i.e. when pressed with a gentle fingertip, it rebounds rather than leaving a divot).
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