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Found 7 results

  1. Celiac.com 10/23/2018 - As if being on a gluten-free diet for medical reasons weren’t hard enough already, with it’s numerous logistical and social challenges, now comes a new study that spells out the thoughts of the general public about gluten-free dieters, and the picture it paints isn’t pretty. Nearly half of people who responded to a recent survey said that they would judge someone on a gluten-free diet as "selfish, demanding and difficult to please." Another 44 percent say that people who eat a gluten-free diet are "high maintenance," while more than 30 percent call gluten-free eaters "selfish" and 14 percent presume they must be "arrogant." When it comes to questions of dating, More than 40 percent of those surveyed would be reluctant to date someone who was gluten-free, while 10 percent of respondents feared that they would be judged poorly by their gluten-free date. The study by researchers from Western Connecticut State University is the first study of its kind. In it, researchers asked 161 adults if they would date somebody who is gluten-free. Most participants expressed reservations bout dating people on a gluten-free diet. Researchers had another group of 132 people participate in an online dating scenario in which they were told to "imagine going on a first date with an individual who discloses adhering to a gluten-free diet." Participants then rated their prospective date on factors such as perceived kindness, mood, pickiness, and femininity or masculinity. Interestingly, women on a gluten-free diet were perceived to be more feminine. Some participants claimed they would be more understanding if a person cut out gluten due to an allergy rather than just as part of a fad diet. The good news is that six percent of those surveyed view gluten-free eaters as "understanding," while three percent see them as "happy," "energetic," and "self-disciplined." Its unclear how closely the results of this particular survey reflect the sentiments of the general public, but you can read more results in the DailyMail.com.
  2. By just telling someone I meet about my diet needs and avoidances they seem to freak out and walk out the door! Lol. Does anybody have the same experience?
  3. I am recently divorced and like most the people here, didn't always have celiac disease. I'm ready to get back out and start dating again but it is hard. I have no trouble talking to people and getting dates but then dinner comes up or snacks at the movies or drinks at a bar. celiac disease is probably my biggest challenge ever and it's asking a lot to ask someone to understand. It would be easier to find another person with celiac disease than to ask someone to also sacrifice things they enjoy too. I even tried the site Gluten Free Singles but there's no women within 150 miles. Anybody have any ideas or advice?
  4. Hi all, I've been gluten-free for almost a year now, and am starting to feel better somewhat. I didn't bother dating while I was going through the healing process because I was just too sick. Now that my health has improved some I'd like to start dating again, but it always ends up with my trying to explain that I can't eat out and it gets awkward and the date doesn't happen or goes badly because I have yet to find someone who understands celiac. Anyone else deal with these issues? It would be cool to share experiences, advice, etc. on the subject!
  5. Hi guys. I know this is a topic that has come up before, but I'd appreciate a little bit of advice. I've been 'courting' a guy for the past few months; nothing has happened yet but we have a proper date in a few weeks which is likely to lead to kissing. He didn't even know what a ceoliac was until a few days ago; I don't think he'd caught the hints that I'd been dropping beforehand. English isn't his first language - he's east Asian. Anyway, I've heard about being potentially glutened via a kiss. How do I broach this? I don't want to scare him off or make him think that I'm a lot of hard work; I know, I know, he's going to have to accept me as I am, etc. but for someone new to the entire thing, it is likely overwhelming. It would be for me if I'd never heard of it! Do I laughingly bring it up beforehand? We aren't going for food so if he isn't eating, just having a cup of tea, will I still need to be careful? If this seems safe, do I just let him kiss me and then bring up afterwards that any future kisses after food will have different precautions? It all feels so clinical! He's a lovely guy so I do think he'll be understanding, but if anyone has any advice of first hand experience on how to approach the topic without it being a weird moment, that would be great.
  6. So I'm relatively new to having celiac and being gluten free/dairy free (almost a year now), but have had a downright horrible time adjusting. 10 ER trips and a hospital stay later, I'm still having more sick days than healthy days. Anyways, I recently had my first kiss since going gluten free and I followed all of the precautions; he had last eaten gluten 4 hours earlier AND he brushed his teeth before we kissed (with gluten-free toothpaste!) Within 30 minutes, the pain started and didn't stop for the next 2.5 weeks. I was nauseous, fatigued, and had what felt like paper cuts all along my intestines and under my ribcage. I know I was not glutened from my own doing because I watch what I eat like a hawk and have severely restricted my diet so I know exactly what's going in my body. Gluten free beauty & hair products, no medication, eating only prepackaged foods and food I prepare for myself only, and haven't eaten out in almost 6 months. So there's no chance I got glutened from anything else besides the kiss. I guess what i'm asking is if it's normal to get sick for that long from a kiss under those circumstances? I know I'm more sensitive to gluten than my family members who exhibit almost NO symptoms (lucky for them!), but I haven't officially been labeled "super sensitive"
  7. Hi everyone, I'm 20 years old and want to share my story and my perspective, on some common issues for people with celiac. I have been gluten-free for various periods of time in my life, as I tried different diets to help get rid of fatigue, brain fog, and anxiety. When I look back, I can see now that I have been allergic to gluten ever since I was 13, maybe even before then. I ignored the symptoms for the most part, until at 16 I began to realize how I would feel different after eating certain foods. So I tried a variety of different diets over time: Atkins, Paleo, Vegetarian, Vegan, and Fruitarian. In between all of these diets I would try to go back and eat "normal" foods again, and would inevitably get sick, and the cycle would start over again. However, some of these diets, particularily Paleo and Fruitarian, made me feel really good. I realized what they had in common: they were gluten and dairy free. I did some research and figured out that I had celiac and was lactose intolerant. I've been on a gluten-free, vegan diet for about 9 months now. It's been tremendously successful for me. However, there are aspects of life that can be challenging for this lifestyle, namely college, work, travel, and dating. College is difficult because the beer&pizza stereotypes exist for a reason - college is full of it. The way I have gotten around it is to have a mini fridge, microwave, and large rice-cooker in my dorm room, which allows me to prepare essentially all my own food. Classes are also only a couple hours a day, so it's no problem. The problem for me right now is with work. I have two internships this summer back-to-back through-out the day. I leave my house around 6:30 am and don't get home until 5:00 pm. This represents a huge challenge to me, as I now have to either bring enough food to last me all day, or I have to bring some food and eat out at lunch. The problem is that there is essentially NO gluten free place in the area I'm working in that can provide me with 100% gluten free food on a daily basis. It's a challenge. Right now I'm just bringing enough food for the day, but it's hard to do. Travelling is difficult for obvious reasons. You can't prepare your own food most of the time, and you're constantly on the move. However, I've found it to be significantly easier than work. Since you're not tied down to being in any specific location, you're more free to hunt and explore for places that have gluten-free accommodations. A lot of people on here have expressed concerns about dating, and I would like to echo some of the advice already given on here. It's really about respecting yourself first and foremost. Celiac is a disease. It is a medical necessity to you that you are gluten free. When you find the right person for you (and you will), they honestly will not care about the restrictions this poses to them. Life is about people and human contact first, and food second. Having celiac has made me more aware, empathetic, and tolerant of others' struggles and disabilities, and it's made me realize that we all have them. Nobody is perfect, and that's the point. When you're dating someone, it's because they want to be around you, not because they like to eat pizza (and besides, there's always gluten-free pizza). So there's both hope and despair, for on the hand being gluten free has allowed me to live once again! It has represented the largest single change that has brought me the most clarity, and I'm very thankful for that. But on the other hand, it feels like it has severely restricted my ability to be free. My life has become more routine and structured and isolated, and I sometimes feel irrationally afraid of the world (filled with gluten). So it's bittersweet, and I'm sure it's a normal part of the process as I learn to live with this. It's really interesting how much diet truly does matter.
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