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Found 6 results

  1. Celiac.com 12/09/2013 - People with celiac disease commonly suffer malabsorption, weight loss and vitamin/mineral-deficiencies. A team of researchers recently set out to assess the nutritional and vitamin/mineral status of current “early diagnosed” untreated adult celiac disease patients in the Netherlands. The research team included Nicolette J. Wierdsma, Marian A. E. van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren, Marijke Berkenpas, Chris J. J. Mulder, and Ad A. van Bodegraven. They are affiliated with the Department of Nutrition and Dietetics and the Department of Gastroenterology at Celiac Centre Amsterdam in VU University Medical Centre in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Researchers assessed 80 newly diagnosed adult celiac patients, averaging 42.8 years old, ± 15.1 years. They compared vitamin concentrations for those patients against a sample of 24 healthy Dutch subjects. Before prescribing gluten-free diets to the patients, the researchers assessed nutritional status and serum concentrations of folic acid, vitamin A, B6, B12, and (25-hydroxy) D, zinc, haemoglobin (Hb) and ferritin. Almost nine out of ten celiac patients (87%) measured at least one value below the lowest normal reference levels. Specifically, for vitamin A, 7.5% of patients showed deficient levels, for vitamin B6 14.5%, folic acid 20%, and vitamin B12 19%. Likewise, 67% of celiac patients showed zinc deficiency, 46% showed decreased iron storage, and 32% had anaemia. Overall, 17% of celiac patients were malnourished, with more than 10% experiencing undesired weight loss, 22% of the women underweight (Body Mass Index (BMI) < 18.5), and 29% of the patients overweight (BMI > 25). Vitamin deficiencies were nearly non-existent in healthy control subjects, though they did show some vitamin B12 deficiency. Interestingly, vitamin and or mineral deficiencies were not associated with greater histological intestinal damage or with adverse nutritional status. This study shows that vitamin and/or mineral deficiencies are still common in newly “early diagnosed” celiac patients, even as rates of obesity upon initial celiac diagnosis continue to rise. Thorough nutritional monitoring is likely warranted for establishing a dietary baseline and maintaining nutritional levels during the course of celiac disease treatment. Source: Nutrients 2013, 5(10), 3975-3992; doi:10.3390/nu5103975
  2. Celiac.com 05/11/2015 - Many people with celiac disease know that gluten exposure can cause gut damage and trouble absorbing some vitamins and minerals, which can lead to serious deficiencies. However, even celiac who follow gluten-free diets may experience similar issues, including impaired vitamin and mineral absorption. The most common vitamin and mineral deficiencies in celiac patients include the following vitamins and minerals: B vitamins, especially B12 Vitamin A Vitamin D Vitamin E Vitamin K Iron Calcium Carotene Copper Folic acid Magnesium Selenium Zinc As a result, patients with celiac disease can develop iron-deficiency anemia, including a type that resists oral iron supplementation, and may also develop osteoporosis and osteopenia due to bone loss resulting from decreased calcium and vitamin D absorption. For these reasons, it is important that patients with celiac disease be monitored regularly to ensure that they have proper levels of vitamins and minerals in their bodies. Source: U.S. Pharmacist
  3. Celiac.com 06/19/2017 - Adults with celiac disease often show atypical symptoms, though it is not uncommon for them to suffer from malabsorption of vitamins and minerals, which can result in disrupt normal bone metabolism. A team of researchers recently set out to evaluate laboratory deficiencies related to bone metabolism, and to assess the relationship between severity of histological damage and the degree of bone mass loss at celiac diagnosis. The research team included L. Posthumus, and A. Al-Toma A of the Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, St Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands. Their team conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study of 176 adult celiac patients. All patients met the histopathological criteria for clinical celiac disease. The team analyzed biochemical data, including calcium, phosphate, alkaline-phosphatase, vitamin D and parathormone. They classified duodenal histology based on Marsh parameters. They used dual X-ray absorptiometry to determine bone mass density (BMD) at the lumbar and femoral regions. P-values below 0.05 were considered significant. They found no correlation between gastrointestinal symptoms and Marsh histopathological stage (P>0.05). Nearly 50 percent of patients showed vitamin D deficiency (44.5%), while only 5.7% showed hypocalcaemia. Patients with Marsh III did show lower calcium (P<0.05) and parathormone was higher (P=0.01). These patients had lower lumbar T-score (P<0.05). Although low BMD occurred in all age groups, most osteoporotic patients were aged 45-49 years (81.8%). A multiple regression analysis did show that Marsh stage could indicate lower lumbar BMD (r=0.322, B=-1.146, P<0.05). At celiac diagnosis, Marsh histopathological stage can predict low BMD, which can develop into osteoporosis. Based on these data, the team suggests that doctors should consider evaluating bone biomarkers and conducting a dual X-ray absorptiometry exam in celiac patients over 30 years of age. Source: Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2017 Apr 27. doi: 10.1097/MEG.0000000000000880.
  4. Celiac.com 08/19/2014 - It is common for many people with celiac disease to have vitamin deficiencies. Eating a wide variety of foods such as meat, fish, eggs and vegetables can assist in with fixing those deficiencies. Children need vitamins to promote growth, development and good immune health. As adults we need them to prevent disease and stay healthy. First, including small amounts of free-range, grass-fed beef in the diet will help you recover from iron deficiency. Fresh fish may help lower cholesterol, as it contains healthy omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D. Egg whites from free range hens are high in protein and omega-3 fatty acids. Eating a balanced diet is the best way to receive the daily allowance of vitamins, rather than taking supplements, although many celiacs will also need to take supplements for some time to fully recover. Next, vegetables supply vitamins and minerals, contain no cholesterol, and are low in calories. Vegetables that are colorful are very important in the daily diet. Bell peppers, broccoli and string beans are good sources of vitamin A. Fresh dark green leafy vegetables like kale are a strong source of folic acid, which assist in red blood cell formation. Spinach is full of vitamin D, Iron and Calcium. Vegetables are also high in complex carbohydrates and fiber. Try Romaine and dark leafy green lettuce for salads, as they will have more nutrients than Iceberg lettuce, which has a high amount of water and sodium. Last, what are some of the best methods for cooking food to keep the most vitamins and nutrients in them? Steaming vegetables can retain the majority of nutrients, while boiling them can overcook them and cause a loss of vitamins. Try to cook vegetables, poultry and fish without extra fat by steaming them over low sodium broth, instead of water. Another healthy alternative is to stir fry vegetables. Since stir fry uses a small amount of oil, it is a fast and low-fat method to cook meals. The best part about cooking with the stir fry method is that food will retain vitamins and flavor better, since it is a fast healthy alternative. Always talk with a doctor about dietary needs before making changes to your diet, and have your doctor test you for celiac disease before going on a gluten-free diet.
  5. The following was taken from AUTISM 95: The following was written about a study: to determine whether children with autism and known food/chemical intolerance have a deficiency of phenol-sulphotransferase-P enzyme and/or a low capacity to oxidize sulfur compounds. On the results obtained so far, all 18 children have a low enzyme level, and some have a low capacity to oxidize sulfur compounds. This enzyme metabolizes phenols and amines. Therefore, with a reduced level, these children will be unable to fully metabolize foods and chemicals which contain phenols (and amines)... ...The majority of children in this category ... have allergy to or intolerance of many foods/chemicals, the main offenders being wheat, cows milk, and salicylates. Their family histories show asthma, eczema, migraines, hay fever, plus many other allergy-related conditions...Their siblings display learning difficulties, dyslexia, etc..... In autism and other disorders we suspect a peptidase deficiency so that proteins are not broken down into individual amino acids and these short, biologically active chains (peptides) exist in appreciable quantities. Even in the normal gut there will be some of these substances but they are not normally a problem. If the gut wall is leaky (celiac disease or lack of sulfur transferase, etc) these compounds will get into the bloodstream. Even then there should be no serious problem unless they enter the blood... ...The brain is protected by the blood brain barrier (BBB) which is partly physical and partly chemical in nature. Thus this would keep peptides out unless there are huge quantities circulating. So when the intestinal wall is not healthy and the brain is vulnerable, the brain is affected directly. Learning disabilities, behavioral problems, and even extremes such as schizophrenic behavior can result. The three things which happen are: Not Enough Enzymes To Fully Digest Particular Protein Chains A Breachable Intestinal Wall A Vulnerable Brain
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