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Found 4 results

  1. Did you ever wonder if your gluten-free diet is really 100% gluten-free? Did you know that you're supposed to be getting regular checkups with your doctor to verify that? The Gluten Detective's stool and urine at-home test kits are designed to verify that your diet is gluten-free, at least during the three or more days prior to running a test. Both the stool and urine tests do the same thing, and both kits make each type of test very easy to carry out. The kits come complete with everything you need, including gloves, collection instruments, extraction solution, dilution solution, test strip, etc. There are many reasons to regularly use these kits. For example, if you eat out regularly at restaurants or at friends' houses you could use them to verify that your food has been safe. Alternatively if you got sick after a meal you could also use a test kit to see if gluten was indeed the culprit, instead of not knowing for sure what made you feel sick. Perhaps you need to ditch that favorite restaurant? Ultimately these kits are designed to help you make better choices with your gluten-free diet, and learn how to stay safe. They are an inexpensive way to regularly monitor your gluten-free dietary compliance. For more info visit their site.
  2. Celiac.com 08/19/2013 - Data from blood studies suggest that about 1% or so of North Americans have celiac disease. However, there is no good screening data based on small intestinal biopsy performed during routine endoscopic evaluations. Researcher H.J Freeman recently set out to determine rates of detection of adult celiac disease via duodenal screening biopsies over a thirty year period. For his study, he looked at patients referred between January 1982 and December 2011 for evaluation of gastrointestinal symptoms that required elective investigative upper endoscopic assessment, and who underwent duodenal biopsies to determine whether changes of adult celiac disease were present. Freeman looked at a total of 9665 patients, including 4008 (41.5%) males and 5657 (68.5%) females, who underwent elective endoscopies and duodenal biopsies. Overall, 234 patients (2.4%) exhibited changes of celiac disease. That included 73 males (1.8%) and 161 females (2.8%). During the first 20 years, the number of biopsy-positive patients in five-year intervals progressively decreased, while, during the next 10 years, the number progressively increased. From this study, the team concludes that celiac disease is far more common in specialist practice than has been suggested in the evaluation of healthy populations using serological screening studies. Endoscopic duodenal biopsy is an important way to spot underlying celiac disease and should be routinely considered in all patients undergoing an elective endoscopic evaluation. They also note that the appearance of biopsy-defined celiac disease may be influenced by non-inherited factors, possibly environmental, which alter its detection over time. Source: Can J Gastroenterol. 2013 Jul;27(7):405-8.
  3. Celiac.com 10/29/2008 - The intestinal inflammation that arises when people with celiac disease consume wheat, rye or barley occurs when HLA-DQ2-restricted CD4+ T-cells recognize peptides derived from gluten in the food. Peptides that stimulate an immune response like this are found in both gliadins and glutenins. A team of researchers based in the Netherlands recently discovered that particular types of antibodies called monoclonal antibodies react to the presence of gluten proteins in much the same way that the human HLA-DQ2-restricted CD4+ T-cells do, and that monoclonal antibodies offer promise for reliably detecting the presence of wheat, barley, rye, and even oat gluten in food products. The team was made up of Cristina Mitea, Yvonne Kooy-Winkelaar, Peter van Veelen, Arnoud de Ru, Jan W Drijfhout, Frits Koning and Liesbeth Dekking. They recently set out to assess the specificity of 5 different types of monoclonal antibodies in how they react to T-cell stimulatory peptides found in alpha - and gamma-gliadins and in low- and high-molecular-weight glutenins, and to compare it with the specificity of patient-derived T-cells. The team assessed the reaction levels of selected monoclonal antibodies with gluten peptides, enzymatic gluten digests, and intact gluten proteins, and compared the results to those for gluten-specific T-cells by using a combination of immunologic and biochemical techniques. They also assessed the reactivity of the monoclonal antibodies with gluten homologues in barley, rye, and oats. They found that the specificity of the monoclonal antibodies largely overlaps with that of gluten-specific T-cells. Moreover, monoclonal antibodies detect several distinct homologous peptides present in gluten proteins. The results showed that monoclonal antibodies that react to the immune-triggering peptides found in both gliadins and glutenins can be used to screen food for the presence of immune-triggering peptides. All monoclonal antibodies, except those that are LMW-specific, also detect storage proteins present in barley and rye, whereas the {gamma} -gliadin-specific monoclonal antibodies also recognize oat proteins. This discovery could lead to the development of a reliable test for detecting harmful gluten and related proteins and peptides in food products, or for determining if food products labeled as gluten-free were indeed free of gluten. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 88, No. 4, 1057-1066, October 2008
  4. V. Kumar,* M. Jarzabek-Chorzelska, J. Sulej, Krystyna Karnewska,** T. Farrell,* and S. Jablonska *IMMCO Diagnostics, Inc., Buffalo, New York 14228; Departments of Microbiology and Dermatology, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214; and Department of Dermatology, Warsaw School of Medicine, Warsaw, Poland; ** Department of Gastroenterology and Pediatrics, Selesian School of Medicine, Warsaw, Poland Clinical Diagnostic Immunology 9:1295-1300, 2002. Celiac.com 12/31/2002 - Background: Immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency is 10-15 times more common in patients with Celiac Disease (celiac disease) than in normal subjects. Serological tests have become the preferred methods of detecting both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with celiac disease. However, commercially available serological methods are limited in that they detect only the IgA isotype of antibodies (with the exception of IgG gliadin assays); hence, IgA deficient celiac disease patients may yield false negative serology. Methods: Fifteen celiac disease and ten non-celiac disease IgA deficient pediatric cases were examined for IgA and IgG antibodies to endomysium, gliadin and tissue transglutaminase. Results: Twenty five specimens with IgA deficiency were examined. Fifteen were celiac disease cases and ten were non-celiac disease cases. All fifteen IgA deficient celiac disease cases were positive for endomysium antibodies of the IgG isotype and for IgG gliadin antibodies. All but one of the IgA deficient celiac disease cases were also positive for IgG tissue transglutaminase antibodies. None of the non-celiac disease IgA deficient cases were positive for any of the antibody markers. All the specimens examined were also negative for IgA specific antibodies to endomysium, gliadin, and tissue transglutaminase. Conclusions: IgG specific antibody tests for endomysium, gliadin and tissue transglutaminase are useful for the identification of IgA deficient celiac disease patients. IgG antibody tests along with tests routinely being used in clinical laboratories can reliably detect all active celiac disease patients. In addition, the levels of these celiac disease-specific IgG antibodies could be used to monitor patient dietary compliance.
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