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Found 3 results

  1. Celiac.com 01/17/2010 - A team of researchers based in the Netherlands and in Germany recently found that abnormal T-Lymphocytes in refractory celiac disease may occur beyond small intestinal intraepithelia. The research team was made up of W.H.M. Verbeek, B.M.E. von Blomberg, V.M.H. Coupe, and S. Daum, C.J.J. Mulder, and M.W.J. Schreurs. The team members are associated with the Departments of Gastroenterology, Pathology, Epidemiology and Biostatistics at VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, and with the Department of Medicine I, Gastroenterology, Infectious Diseases & Rheumatology at Charite Universitatsmedizin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, in Berlin, Germany. Refractory celiac disease (RCD) is characterized by persistent mucosal pathology despite a strict gluten free diet. Patients with RCD type II show phenotypically abnormal (CD71CD3-CD4/8-cytoplasmicCD31) T-lymphocytes within the intraepitelial lymphocyte (IEL) population in the small intestine, with 50–60% of these patients developing an enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL). The goal of the study was to determine whether abnormal T-lymphocytes in RCD II can be detected in other parts of the small intestinal mucosa besides the intraepithelial compartment. Additionally, the presence of aberrant T-lymphocytes was analyzed in two RCD II patients that developed atypical skin lesions. Researchers conducted multi-parameter flow cytometric immunophenotyping on both IEL and lamina propria lymphocyte (LPL) cell suspensions, isolated from small bowel biopsy specimens of RCD II patients (n 5 14), and on cutaneous lymphocytes isolated from skin-lesion biopsy specimens of RCD II patients (n 5 2). They also carried out immunofluorescence analysis of frozen RCD II derived small intestinal biopsies. The results clearly show that abnormal T-lymphocytes may develop in both the IEL and the LPL compartments of RCD II derived small intestinal biopsies. Indeed, even though the highest percentages are always found in the IEL compartment, abnormal LPL can exceed 20% of total LPL in half of patients with RCD II. Interestingly, cutaneous lymphocytes isolated from atypical skin lesions that developed in some RCD II patients showed a similar abnormal immunophenotype as found in the intestinal mucosa. In RCD II, the abnormal T-lymphocytes may also manifest in the sub-epithelial layer of the small intestinal mucosa, in the lamina propria, or even in locations completely outside the intestine, including the skin. Whether this finding indicates a passive overflow from the intestinal epithelium or active movement towards other anatomical locations remains to be determined. Source: Cytometry Part B (Clinical Cytometry) 76B:367–374 (2009)
  2. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics Volume 17 Issue 4 Page 587 - February 2003 Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2003 Feb;17(4):587-94 Peraaho M, Kaukinen K, Paasikivi K, Sievanen H, Lohiniemi S, Maki M, Collin P. Departments of Medicine and Pediatrics, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere (also Medical School, University of Tampere), Bone Research Group, UKK Institute, Tampere, and Finnish Coeliac Society, Tampere, Finland. Celiac.com 3/14/2003 - BACKGROUND: : The safety of wheat-starch-based gluten-free products in the treatment of coeliac disease is debatable. Prospective studies are lacking. AIM: : To compare the clinical, histological and serological response to a wheat-starch-based or natural gluten-free diet in patients with newly detected coeliac disease. METHODS: : Fifty-seven consecutive adults with untreated coeliac disease were randomized to a wheat-starch-based or natural gluten-free diet. Clinical response, small bowel mucosal morphology, CD3+, alphabeta+ and gammadelta+ intraepithelial lymphocytes, mucosal human leucocyte antigen-DR expression and serum endomysial, transglutaminase and gliadin antibodies were investigated before and 12 months after the introduction of the gluten-free diet. Quality of life measurements were performed by standardized questionnaires and the bone mineral density was analyzed. RESULTS: : In both groups, abdominal symptoms were alleviated equally by a strict diet. There were no differences between the groups in mucosal morphology, the density of intra-epithelial lymphocytes, serum antibodies, bone mineral density or quality of life tests at the end of the study. Four patients on a natural gluten-free diet and two on a wheat-starch-based gluten-free diet had dietary lapses; as a result, inadequate mucosal, serological and clinical recovery was observed. CONCLUSIONS: : The dietary response to a wheat-starch-based gluten-free diet was as good as that to a natural gluten-free diet in patients with newly detected coeliac disease. PMID: 12622768
  3. Celiac.com 11/06/2007 - This study investigated the effect of screening detected celiac disease in type I diabetic children in a multi-center case-control fashion. The research team consisted of B Rami, Z Sumni, E Schober et al from Austria, Czech Republic, and Slovenia, among other European countries. The team compared 98 diabetics with silent celiac disease to 196 control diabetics without celiac matched for age, sex, diabetes duration. Mean age at diabetes diagnosis was 6.5 yrs, celiac diagnosis was 10.0 yrs. Celiac screening included yearly antibody testing and positive patients underwent biopsy. Hemoglobin A1c, hypoglycemia, ketoacidosis, insulin dosage, body-mass index, and height did not differ between cases and controls at celiac diagnosis or after a mean follow-up of 3.3 years. After diagnosis of celiac disease, weight gain was diminished in boys with celiac disease compared to their controls. Although a clear link between type I diabetes and increased risk of celiac disease is established, the benefit of a gluten-free diet is unclear in these children. This study followed 98 patients with diabetes and silent celiac for a mean of 3.3 years and compared them to 196 controls. This is the largest, best designed case-control study to date and it did not demonstrate any significant differences between the two groups, except for a decreased Body Mass Index (BMI - though still greater than non-diabetic, control children) in males after diagnosis. What is more intriguing is that at diagnosis, no significant differences in height, BMI, HbA1c, insulin need, or hypoglycemia events were seen, questioning the metabolic significance of silent celiac disease. In this study, it is difficult to estimate the duration of silent celiac disease prior to diagnosis. Although, given the fact that these patients were asymptomatic and their mean diabetes duration was 3.6 years, it likely implies that silent celiac disease was present for a few years. The data regarding the benefit of a gluten-free diet in screening detected celiac disease in type I diabetic children is scant but is slowly increasing. Numerous psychological (burden of gluten free diet in addition to diabetic diet), cost (of diet), and ethical issues (potential long-term benefits of gluten-free diet, compliance with diet) exist regarding these children and hopefully this question will be answered soon and with good, convincing data. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, 41:317-321, 2005
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