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Found 10 results

  1. Celiac.com 09/01/2018 - Celiac disease is a common disease triggered by gliadin exposure in genetically sensitive individuals. It has long been known that untreated celiac disease is associated with intestinal malabsorption, but it is also associated with ongoing inflammation. This inflammation may have adverse effects on the uptake of important nutrients. This is probably the underlying reason for the increased risk of osteoporosis demonstrated in patients with celiac disease. Malabsorption and ongoing inflammation in untreated celiac disease could also potentially have a negative effect on fetal development. Several reports have indicated an adverse effect of untreated celiac disease on pregnancy outcome. We set out to use the national registers of Sweden to: Evaluate the association of untreated celiac disease and birth weight, pregnancy duration and intrauterine growth. Evaluate the same association in treated celiac disease. Compare the risk of the above two groups with a reference group of 2.8 million births to mothers who never had a diagnosis of celiac disease. A fourth objective was to evaluate placental weight to see if lower placental weight was more frequent in women with celiac disease. We found that untreated celiac disease (women diagnosed after pregnancy, but most likely having untreated celiac disease at time of pregnancy) was associated with a two-fold risk of low birth weight, pre-term birth, intrauterine growth retardation and cesarean section. The low birth weight and intrauterine growth retardation may have been mediated through malabsorption, since placental weight was lowest in women with untreated celiac disease. This study was published in Gastroenterology Aug 2005. A link to this paper can be found here: gastrojournal.org After that we set out to evaluate the association between adverse pregnancy outcome in males with untreated and treated celiac disease. In a previous paper, we had found an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcome when the father had celiac disease (Ludvigsson et al, Gut, 2001). Now, taking advantage of the large Swedish national registers (all births since 1973 and onwards are recorded), we found no increased risk of low birth weight, pre-term birth or cesarean section in infants to fathers with untreated or treated celiac disease. This study was published in the Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology in Feb 2006.
  2. Celiac.com 08/21/2015 - Here's every celiac disease treatment currently in development in a single list: ALV003, by Alvine Pharmaceuticals, is a combination of two enzymes that break down gluten before it can provoke an immune reaction. The drug is a powder to be dissolved in water and taken before meals. ALV003 most recently passed a phase 2 clinical trial, results of which appeared in the June 2014 issue of Gastroenterology. Post-trial biopsies showed that ALV003 prevented intestinal damage in 34 volunteers with celiac disease who ate 2 grams of gluten each day for six weeks and also took the drug. Phase 2b, a 12-week trial, is now underway. AN-PEP, by DSM Food Specialties, is another enzyme that degrades gluten. AN-PEP is believed to work best when taken while gluten is still in the stomach. Results from a small 2013 study showing AN-PEP to be safe, appeared in the World Journal of Gastroenterology. For the study, 16 people ate 7 grams of gluten every day for two weeks and half of them also ate AN-PEP, and half took a placebo. However, the placebo group did not get sick enough during the course of the study to show that the enzyme had any effect, so further study is under way. ActoBiotics by ActoGenX uses Lactococcus lactis as an expression system to locally secrete bio-therapeutics such as cytokines, antibodies, hormones, etc. Early pre-clinical work with a genetically altered L. lactis secreting a peptide derived from gliadin demonstrated an in vivo suppression of gluten sensitization. Specifically, Huigbregtse et al. engineered L. lactis to secrete a deamidated DQ8 gliadin epitope (LL-eDQ8d) and studied the induction of Ag-specific tolerance in NOD ABo DQ8 transgenic mice [34]. Although apparently not part of the ActoGenX development program, recent work by Galipeau et al. also deserves mention in this context. The group treated gluten-sensitive mice with elafin, a serine protease inhibitor, delivered by the L. lactis vector, and found normalization of inflammation, improved permeability, and maintained ZO-1 expression. There is speculation that this is due to reduced deamidation of gliadin peptide. AVX176 by Avaxia Biologics, is an investigational oral antibody drug patented to provide "Antibody Therapy for Treatment of Diseases Associated with Gluten Intolerance." The patent, which expires on May 27 2029, provides broad coverage for treating celiac disease using orally administered antibodies produced by Avaxia's proprietary platform technology. BL-7010, by BioLineRx, is a novel co-polymer for the treatment of celiac disease, which significantly reduces the immune response triggered by gluten. This drug has been shown in mice to reduce the immune system response that leads to intestinal damage and villous atrophy in celiac disease. BL-7010 actually binds to the gluten protein, reducing the protein's toxicity.The drug, with the gluten molecule attached, then passes harmlessly through the digestive system to be expelled as stool. BL-7010 has undergone safety testing in humans and was found to be well tolerated. According to BioLineRx, testing will begin in mid-2015 to see if the drug works as expected to diminish gluten's effects on the body. However, BL-7010 is designed to protect only against gluten cross-contamination; it won't allow people with celiac disease to eat large amounts of gluten. CCR9, by Chemocentryx, is a drug called vercirnon, which is also known as Traficet-EN, or CCX282B), and was originally intended for patients with moderate-to-severe Crohn's disease. CCR9 has completed one Phase 2 trial in 67 patients with celiac disease. However, despite the completion of the trial several years ago, no results relating to celiac disease have been made public or published. Egg Yolk Enzyme. Little is known about efforts to develop a celiac treatment that uses egg yolk to coat gluten and allow it to pass through the body undetected, thus preventing an adverse gluten reaction in sensitive individuals. Like most other drugs being developed, this treatment would work to prevent reactions to small amounts of gluten, rather than as a cure. Larazotide Acetate by Alba Therapeutics. How it works: Larazotide acetate blocks a protein that carries pieces of gluten across the gut, where immune cells can see them. Fasano and his colleagues found that this carrier protein, called zonulin, is overproduced by celiac patients after they eat gluten. Results of the most recent phase 2 trial of larazotide acetate, published in February 2015 in Gastroenterology. The volunteers who took the drug experienced fewer days with disease symptoms during the 12 week-long study. Nexvax2, by ImmusanT, works much like an allergy shot. Nexvax2 exposes the immune system to gluten in a controlled way so that immune cells that are usually activated get turned off or eliminated. So far, Nexvax2 has completed a phase 1 trial showing it to be safe. More research is being done to test whether it is effective. Designed to work as a vaccine, Nexvax2 combines three proprietary peptides that elicit an immune response in celiac disease patients who carry the immune recognition gene HLA-DQ2. Similar to allergy shots, the vaccine is designed to reprogram gluten-specific T cells triggered by the patient's immune response to the protein. ZED1227 by Dr. Falk Pharma and Zedira recently announced the start of phase I clinical trials for the drug candidate ZED1227, a direct acting inhibitor of tissue transglutaminase. The small molecule targets the dysregulated transglutaminase within the small intestine in order to dampen the immune response to gluten which drives the disease process. Stay tuned for updates and progress reports as these drugs work their way through their various trial phases. Finally, share your thoughts on all these celiac drugs in the development pipeline. Are you excited, wary, both? Let us know by commenting below. Source: Gastroenterology Report
  3. Celiac.com 06/15/2015 - It's well-documented that people with active celiac disease are more likely to have osteoporosis and increased risk of fractures. High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) allows for three-dimensional exploration of bone micro-architecture, including measurement of cortical and trabecular compartments, and providing detailed information on bone disease pathophysiology and fracture. Using HR-pQCT, research team recently set out to assess the volumetric and micro-architectural characteristics of peripheral bones. that is the distal radius and tibia, in adult pre-menopausal women with active freshly diagnosed celiac disease. The research team included María Belén Zanchetta, Florencia Costa, Vanesa Longobardi, Gabriela Longarini, Roberto Martín Mazure, María Laura Moreno, Horacio Vázquez, Fernando Silveira, Sonia Niveloni, Edgardo Smecuol, María de la Paz Temprano, Hui Jer Hwang, Andrea González, Eduardo César Mauriño, Cesar Bogado, Jose R. Zanchetta, an dJulio César Bai. They are variously affiliated with the IDIM, Instituto de Diagnóstico e Investigaciones Metabólicas, and with the Cátedra de Osteología y Metabolismo Mineral, Universidad del Salvador, Buenos Aires, Argentina. For the study, their team prospectively enrolled 31 consecutive premenopausal women with newly diagnosed celiac disease (median age 29 years, range: 18–49) and 22 healthy women of similar age (median age 30 years, range 21–41) and body mass index. Using HR-pQCT, the team was able to successfully identify significant deterioration in the micro-architecture of trabecular and cortical compartments of peripheral bones. HR-pQCT revealed that most bone micro-architecture parameters were substantially reduced in celiac disease patients compared to a control group. Twenty-two patients showed symptomatic celiac disease. These patients had a greater bone micro-architectural deficit than those with sub-clinical celiac disease. Impaired bone micro-architecture could be one cause of diminished bone strength and higher risk of fractures seen in many celiac patients. The researchers are looking to conduct a follow-up of this group of patients. They want to know whether bone micro-architecture recovers with a gluten-free diet, and, if so, how quickly and to what extent. Source: BONE July 2015, Volume 76, Pages 149–157. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bone.2015.03.005
  4. Celiac.com 10/02/2017 - For anyone following the efforts by ImmusanT to develop a vaccine for celiac disease, the company's recent presentations at the 2017 International Celiac Disease Symposium (ICDS) in New Delhi, India, were welcome news. Nexvax2® is a therapeutic vaccine intended to protect against the effects of gluten exposure while maintaining a gluten-free diet in HLA-DQ2.5+ patients with celiac disease. The company announced at ICDS 2017 that it has presented data showing the immunologic basis for the early clinical effects of gluten in celiac disease. Presented in two poster presentations and an oral presentation, the company says its data show that "early cytokine changes in blood following gluten ingestion could provide the basis for a new diagnostic for celiac disease in patients on a gluten free diet with an uncertain diagnosis," said Robert Anderson, MBChB, Ph.D., Chief Scientific Officer of ImmusanT. The company says its results are "significant" because celiac disease sufferers often adopt a gluten-free diet prior to being diagnosed by a doctor. This can cause problems and lead to unreliable or misleading results with current diagnostic tests. ImmusanT says that their data demonstrate that early changes in circulating cytokines after a single gluten exposure may offer a clinical way to assess celiac disease activity. The company says that the data, along with the potential to differentiate between celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) by assessing IL-2 levels, support the science behind targeted immunotherapies such as Nexvax2®. Read more at BusinessWire.com
  5. Celiac.com 07/25/2016 - Celiac disease is one of the most common immune-mediated diseases. Often, a gluten-free diet does not fully control celiac symptoms and disease activity. Even though no new therapies have been approved, a growing effort, coupled with a rapidly expanding knowledge of the regulatory pathway could soon lead to new breakthroughs. A team of researchers recently reviewed the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and current treatment paradigm for celiac disease. The researchers were M Wungjiranirun, CP Kelly, and DA Leffler, both of the Division of Gastroenterology at the Celiac Center of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, Massachusetts, USA. They also reviewed the major types of therapies being proposed for celiac treatment, and expounded broadly upon what is known, and what can be predicted concerning the regulatory pathway for approval of a new celiac disease treatment. In the near future, increasingly numerous and diverse therapy options will enter clinical trials. The desired result will be the first approved agents targeting celiac disease treatment outside of a gluten-free diet. The team notes that, though things like biopsies and blood tests will always be important in therapeutic clinical trials, there is not currently enough evidence to link them with improved patient outcomes, which is required as a baseline for drug approval. This means that patient-reported outcomes will likely be primary end points in Phase III celiac disease trials for some time to come. Source: Am J Gastroenterol. 2016 Jun;111(6):779-86. doi: 10.1038/ajg.2016.105. Epub 2016 Mar 29.
  6. Celiac.com 07/13/2016 - A really interesting study about gluten-free diets in mice just popped up over at the medical journal Diabetes, that has implications for both diabetes and celiac disease. The study found that a maternal gluten-free diet reduces inflammation and diabetes rates in the offspring of non-obese diabetic mice. The study was conducted by a research team that included Camilla H.F. Hansen, Åukasz Krych, Karsten Buschard, Stine B. Metzdorff, Christine Nellemann, Lars H. Hansen, Dennis S. Nielsen, Hanne Frøkiær, Søren Skov, and Axel K. Hansen. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Veterinary Disease Biology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark, the Department of Food Science, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, the Bartholin Institute, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark, the Division of Toxicology and Risk Assessment, National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Søborg, Denmark, and the Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen in Copenhagen, Denmark. Researchers have known for some time that early life interventions in the intestinal conditions have been shown to influence diabetes rates in mice. For example, a gluten-free diet in known to decrease type 1 diabetes incidence. Their team hypothesized that a gluten-free diet for pregnant mice only during pregnancy and lactation period would protect offspring mice against development of diabetes. The team fed pregnant non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice either a gluten-free or a standard diet, until all mice pups were weaned to standard diet. The early gluten-free mice showed significantly lower rates of diabetes and insulitis. Gut microbiota analysis by 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed significantly increased Akkermansia, Proteobacteria, and TM7 between both mothers and their offspring in the gluten-free diet group. Moreover, the gluten-free offspring showed increased pancreatic FoxP3 regulatory T cells, along with an increase in M2 macrophage gene markers and tight junction-related genes in the gut, coupled with lower intestinal gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Higher numbers of T cells in the pancreas expressing the mucosal integrin α4β7 suggests that the mechanism involve increased trafficking of gut-primed immune cells to the pancreas. This study supports the conclusion that a gluten-free diet during fetal and early postnatal life reduces development of diabetes. This may be due to changes in gut microbiota and better inflammatory and immunological conditions in the gut and pancreas. So, could it be that human mothers who eat a gluten-free diet through weening can impart the same kind of protection against diabetes? Clearly more studies need to be done until we can know for sure, but following a gluten-free diet while pregnant probably wouldn’t cause any harm to the mother or the baby. Source: Diabetes 2014 Apr; DB_131612.
  7. Celiac.com 06/12/2015 - Some researchers have suspected that certain prenatal and perinatal factors might affect risk for development of celiac disease, but there is very little data. With this in mind, a team of researchers set out to determine if any prenatal and perinatal factors might affect risk for development of celiac disease in children. Their team assessed the association of fetal growth, birth weight, and mode of delivery with development of celiac disease within the Norwegian Mother and Child (MoBa) Cohort Study. The research team included Louise Emilsson, Maria Christine Magnus, and Ketil Størdal. They are variously affiliated with the Primary Care Research Unit, Vårdcentralen Värmlands Nysäter, County Council of Värmland, Sweden, the Department of Health Management and Health Economy, Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway, the Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway, and the Paediatric Department, Ostfold Hospital Trust, Fredrikstad, Norway. To make their determination, the team used the MoBa cohort, which contains pregnancy information on 95,200 women and data on their 114,500 children. The information was collected in Norway from 1999 through 2008; it is linked to the Norwegian Medical Birth Registry. The team used the National Patient Registry and women’s responses to MoBa questionnaires to identify women and children with celiac disease. The team calculated odds ratios (ORs) for celiac disease by using a multivariable logistic regression model, adjusting for maternal celiac disease, sex of children, and children’s age (model 1). In model 2, they adjusted for age of gluten introduction and duration of breastfeeding. The team identified 650 children with celiac disease and 107,828 controls in the MoBa database. They found no connection between birth weight or height with celiac disease, including for children who were born small for gestational age. They found no celiac disease connection based on mode of delivery (cesarean section, model 1: OR, 0.84; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.65–1.09, and model 2: OR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.63–1.09). They did find that maternal celiac disease, adjusted for age and sex of the children and type 1 diabetes were associated with development of celiac disease in children, whereas maternal type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes were not. Their analysis of the Norwegian MoBa cohort shows that development of celiac disease in children is significantly associated with sex of the child, maternal celiac disease, and type 1 diabetes, but not with gestational development. Source: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cgh.2014.10.012
  8. Celiac.com 06/26/2014 - Imagine being able to go to a party, or a restaurant, and test any food on your plate for gluten. A company called 6SensorLabs is developing a gluten sensor based on existing protein sensing technology that is already commercially available and proven to work. The company is looking to design a gluten test that can be used with all types of food. The portable test would work by placing a sample of food would be placed in a disposable pod and placing the pod in a sensor. Once activated, the device would tell you, in two minutes or less, if the food sample contained any gluten over the FDA standard of 20 ppm gluten or more. The sensor could also be used to detect gluten in any packaged foods. The sensor is designed to test a specific section of food on your plate, or a sauce, soup or liquid. It would not be able to detect traces of gluten that might be hiding somewhere else on your plate. While the product would have its limits in this respect, it would give users the ability to detect gluten in many cases. Would you want such a tool? Would it be helpful for you?
  9. Celiac.com 07/10/2007 - Studies have shown children with Type 1 diabetes to have a greater risk of developing celiac disease. A study published recently in Diabetes Care shows that people with celiac disease who follow a strict gluten-free diet frequently have inferior body composition and nutritional uptake compared to healthy people without celiac disease. Faced with a shortage of solid data on the exact nature of the levels at which children with type 1 diabetes are at risk for developing celiac disease, a Swedish research team set out to review the Swedish national inpatient registry for the years 1964 to 2003. The research team was made up of Anders Ekbom, Michael Fored, Jonas F. Ludvigsson, Johnny Ludvigsson, Nders Ekbom, Ola Ole, & Scott M. Montgomery. They looked at data for patients with celiac disease who are following a strict gluten-free diet, and who were in full clinical, biochemical, and histological remission. They looked at data from 45,680 patients. Children with a one year follow-up after entering the study were added to the final results. Celiac Disease in Children Linked to Type-1 Diabetes The results showed that children with celiac disease face an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes before the age of 20 (hazard ratio 2.4 [95% CI 1.9 –3.0], P 0.001). Children with celiac disease also faced an increased risk of ketaocidosis or diabetic coma before the age of 20 (2.3 [1.4 –3.9], P 0.001). This increase showed up without regard to the age at diagnosis [those diagnosed between 0 and 2 (2.2 [1.7–2.9], P 0.001) or 3 and 20 (3.4 [1.9 – 6.1], P 0.001) years of age.] Given that 95% of individuals with celiac disease are HLA-DQ2 positive, these increased risk levels were comparatively low, though still significant. Diabetes Care. 2006 Nov;29(11):2483-8. health writer who lives in San Francisco and is a frequent author of articles for Celiac.com.
  10. TI- The Contribution of Some Constitutional Factors (Genetic) to the Development of Cows Milk and Gluten Intolerance in Children. AU- Kaczmarski M; Kurzatkowska B CS- Department of Childrens Infectious Diseases, Medical Academy in BiaLystok, Poland. JN- Rocz Akad Med Bialymst; 33-34 p167-76 PY- 89 1988 AB- The role of genetic factors in the development of cows milk and gluten intolerance among hospitalized children was the subject of analysis made by the authors. The patients were hospitalized at the Clinic of Infectious Diseases of Children during 1973-1982. The first group consisted of 45 children whose ages ranged from 5 months to 5 years (gluten intolerance group), and the second group consisted of 50 children whose ages ranged from 2 months to 5 years (cows milk intolerance group). The study found that symptoms of the trait appeared in 34% of the family members of the children with milk intolerance, and 4.4% of the family members of the children with gluten intolerance. Coeliac disease was observed in 13.3% of the family members of the gluten intolerance group, and 10.8% psychic and/or diabetes disease was found in the same group. The data suggests that the illnesses discussed occur more frequently in members of the same family compared to control groups. This finding can speak for the participation of genetic factors in the development of these types of intolerance among family members. Study: Factors of Cows Milk and Gluten Intolerance* Symptom Group Family Members w/ Same Symptoms Family Members w/ Psychic and/or Diabetes Disease Family Members w/ Celiac Disease 45 Children w/ Gluten Intolerance 4.4% 10.8% 13.3% 50 Children w/ Cows Milk Intolerance 34% N/A N/A
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