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Found 64 results

  1. Celiac.com 10/03/2018 - Gluten-related disorders include the full spectrum of adverse clinical symptoms and conditions triggered by eating gluten. A team of researchers recently set out to review the available medical literature concerning MDs and gluten sensitivity with and without enteropathy. The research team included A Vinagre-Aragón, P Zis, RA Grunewald, and M Hadjivassiliou, with the Academic Department of Neurosciences, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, UK. Celiac disease or gluten sensitive enteropathy is the most common manifestation, but clinicians have reported a number of extra-intestinal manifestations, which may occur without enteropathy. Gluten sensitivity is another term that has been used to include all gluten-related disorders, including those where blood tests show antibodies to gluten in the absence of any enteropathy. Gluten ataxia is the most common extra-intestinal neurological manifestation, and has been well documented. Clinicians have reported movement disorders related to gluten sensitivity. To assess the current medical literature on movement disorders and gluten sensitivity, both with and without enteropathy, the team conducted a systematic search on the PubMed database, and included 48 articles that met the inclusion criteria into the present review. This review demonstrates that the range of gluten related movement disorders goes beyond gluten ataxia, and shows that the majority of patients with gluten-related disorders benefit from a gluten-free diet. Read the full review at: Nutrients. 2018 Aug 8;10(8). pii: E1034. doi: 10.3390/nu10081034.
  2. Celiac.com 09/18/2018 - With a number of major tennis stars singing the praises of a gluten-free diet, including top players like Novak Djokovic, Swiss great Roger Federer weighed in on the topic. The 20-time Grand Slam winner says that he’s never tried the gluten-free diet, and that he doesn’t not “even know what that all means…I eat healthy, and I think that's what people should do, too, if they have the options. It's sure important the right diet for an athlete.” Djokovic, the 2018 US Open winner has been gluten-free since 2011, and calls the diet his biggest key to his success. For Federer, diet is helpful, but not the whole story. “[Diet] can help you, you know. I mean, I think every athlete should be in good shape. I don't think we should have any fat athletes, to be honest. We do too much sports and we should be too professional to let that happen to ourselves. If it happens, well, we should wake up. You don't have the right entourage. They're not telling you that you're a bit fat. Players try different things, and whatever works for them. I do my thing. It's been very easy and natural and healthy, and it's worked.” So, while Novak Djokovic, and a number of other athletes, have gone gluten-free and continue to tout the benefits, look for Federer to remain faithful to his generally nutritious non-gluten-free diet. Read more at: TennisWorldUSA.org
  3. Celiac.com 09/12/2018 - Many people with celiac disease develop peripheral neuropathy, also known as gluten neuropathy. A team of researchers recently set out to determine rates of neuropathic pain in patients with seemingly idiopathic peripheral neuropathy and gluten sensitivity, and to make note of any contributing factors. They included patients with positive antigliadin, endomysial, and/or transglutaminase antibodies, with or without enteropathy. The research team included P Zis, PG Sarrigiannis, DG Rao, and M Hadjivassiliou. They are affiliated with the Academic Department of Neurosciences, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Glossop Rd, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, UK. They invited all consecutive patients with gluten neuropathy attending a specialist gluten/neurology clinic to participate in the study. They used the DN4 questionnaire and the visual analog scale to assess pain levels. They used the Overall Neuropathy Limitations Scale to assess the severity of neuropathy, along with the Mental Health Index (MHI-5) to assess patients' general mental health status. A total of 33 out of 60 patients with gluten neuropathy showed neuropathic pain. The team found no significant differences between the painful, and the non-painful groups in terms of age, gender, neuropathy severity and neuropathy type. Over half of patients with painless gluten neuropathy followed a strict gluten-free diet, compared with just 21.2% of those with painful neuropathy. Patients with painful gluten neuropathy also showed significantly worse MHI-5 scores. After adjusting for age, gender and MHI-5 scores, multivariate analysis showed that, strict gluten-free diet lowered the odds of peripheral neuropathic pain by nearly 90%. Most patients with gluten neuropathy commonly have neuropathic pain, which is associated with poorer mental health status. A strict gluten-free diet might substantially reduce rates of peripheral neuropathic pain in patients with gluten neuropathy. Read more at: J Neurol. 2018 Jul 21. doi: 10.1007/s00415-018-8978-5.PMID: 30032386
  4. I wanted to share what has cleared up my DH rash within a matter of days -- a histamine free diet. (gluten free too of course). You can search online for various diet plans for specific foods to avoid and what to eat. I had been gluten free for over a year, then ate what I thought was custard, only to realize to late it contained cake. That brought on the worst DH I'd ever experienced and nothing offered even the slightest relief. I work in the field of holistic health & wellness and am very much against taking powerful antibiotics. Dapsone, also prescribed for leprosy and HIV patients, didn't make sense to me. I'm a certified Nutritional Therapist, my first thought was the "leaky gut" diet plan, but my rash was still flaring like crazy. (The "leaky gut" foods are nearly all high histamine foods.) Then I started to connect the dots-- rash, histamine response, etc and realized the histamine free diet made sense. Which meant everything I ate that I *thought* was healthy & healing was causing my elevated histamine levels to go even crazier. (I've always eaten clean--my daily diet was about avocados, yogurt, bananas, lentils, cheese, sauerkraut, oranges, tomatoes, etc--- all high histamine-impacting foods!!). When I replaced the histamine containing, histamine releasing and DAO blocking foods, I felt relief within 24 hours. In 48 hours the angry redness had nearly disappeared. On day 3, I must have said 100 times "OMG I'm not itching!!". I had been taking supplements (L-glutamine, quercetin, caprylic acid and PABA) which I know are helping my gut, but the histamine-free diet instantly helped the horrible DH. I wanted to test this and I ate 1/2 a banana (a histamine food) and my skin felt prickly within minutes. I hope this offers someone some relief. If you're doing everything right yet not finding relief, consider the histamine-free diet.
  5. Celiac.com 08/20/2018 - Following a gluten-free diet is critical for people with celiac disease. However, the factors that influence gluten-free diet success for people with celiac disease are not well understood on a population-wide scale. A team of researchers recently set out to assess the factors that influence gluten‐free diet adherence in patients with celiac disease. The research team included E. P. Halmos, M. Deng, S. R. Knowles, K. Sainsbury, B. Mullan, and J. A. Tye‐Din. The team asked celiac patients to complete an online survey that included the validated Celiac Dietary Adherence Test, along with questions on demographics, details of diagnosis and management and assessment of diet knowledge, quality of life and psychological distress. The team then reviewed the survey data for predictors of adherence and quality of life. There were a total of 7,393 survey responses, with 5,310 people completing the Celiac Dietary Adherence Test, and 3,230 of whom were following a gluten‐free diet. Multivariate regression showed that predictors of gluten-free dietary adherence included older age, being male, symptoms severity after gluten consumption, above average gluten-free food knowledge, and lower risk of psychological distress. People with celiac disease who followed a gluten-free diet also reported better quality of life. Respondents who reported having poor food knowledge were more likely to wrongly identify gluten‐free foods, though they could still recognize gluten‐containing foods. This indicates that poor overall food knowledge may lead people with celiac disease to over‐restrict their diet. Poor understanding of gluten‐free diet and stressful psychological well-being were the main modifiable risk factors for failure to follow a gluten‐free diet in patients with celiac disease. From these responses, the team concluded that access to a dietitian and mental health care professional, in cases of psychological stress, is likely necessary to improve gluten-free dietary observation, and thus to improve overall patient health and well-being. Read more at: Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeuticsdoi.org/10.1111/apt.14791 The researchers in this study are variously affiliated with the Department of Gastroenterology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital in Parkville, Victoria, Australia, the Department of Gastroenterology, Central Clinical School, Monash University in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, the Cartovera Pty. Ltd. in Adelaide, SA, Australia, the Department of Psychological Sciences, Faculty of Health, Arts and Design, Swinburne University of Technology in Hawthorn, Victoria, Australia, the Department of Mental Health, St Vincent's Hospital in Fitzroy, Victoria, Australia, the Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne in Parkville, Victoria, Australia, Institute of Health and Society, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle University in Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK, the Health Psychology & Behavioural Medicine Research Group, School of Psychology, Curtin University in Bentley, WA, Australia, the Immunology Division, The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research in Parkville, Victoria, Australia, and the Department of Medical Biology, University of Melbourne in Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
  6. Celiac.com 08/16/2018 - What is the significance of vitamin D serum levels in adult celiac patients? A pair of researchers recently set out to assess the value and significance of 25(OH) and 1,25(OH) vitamin D serum levels in adult celiac patients through a comprehensive review of medical literature. Researchers included F Zingone and C Ciacci are affiliated with the Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology, University of Padua, Padua, Italy; and the Celiac Center, AOU San Giovanni di Dio e Ruggi di Aragona, University of Salerno, Department of Medicine and Surgery, Salerno, Italy. Within the wide spectrum of symptoms and alteration of systems that characterizes celiac disease, several studies indicate a low-level of vitamin D, therefore recent guidelines suggest its evaluation at the time of diagnosis. This review examines the data from existing studies in which vitamin D has been assessed in celiac patients. Our review indicates that most of the studies on vitamin D in adult celiac disease report a 25 (OH) vitamin D deficiency at diagnosis that disappears when the patient goes on a gluten-free diet, independently of any supplementation. Instead, the researchers found that levels of calcitriol, the active 1,25 (OH) form of vitamin D, fell within the normal range at the time of celiac diagnosis. Basically, their study strongly suggests that people with celiac disease can recover normal vitamin D levels through a gluten-free diet, without requiring any supplementation. Source: Dig Liver Dis. 2018 Aug;50(8):757-760. doi: 10.1016/j.dld.2018.04.005. Epub 2018 Apr 13.
  7. Hey, I was wondering if any of you knew - when you eat gluten when you have Celiac, do you take in the calories from the food? Before I was diagnosed, I was extremely malnourished because my body wasn't absorbing vitamins, but does the body absorb the calories? If so, how is so much weight loss possible?
  8. Hello everyone, i will try my best to keep this short but it may not work that way as it’s a long ish story. For about a year I’ve been having some awful stomach issues, diarrhea mostly and weight loss. I had an elevated calprotectin but blood work was normal. I had a colonoscopy, they found some inflammation near the rectum but they gave me a follow up for months later and no one seemed all that concerned, I was told it went well and that I was fine. Finally I was sent for blood work to determine if I have a gluten allergy. I got a call and was told that based on my blood work they want to do an endoscopy to confirm a Celiac diagnosis. I’m an emetphobe (I have an extreme phobia of vomiting which I’ve been in therapy for my whole life) so naturally I decided to forego the endoscopy and just go gluten free. I also had read that the blood work tends to be fairly indicative of a gluten allergy and that endoscopies can produce false negatives. Either way 2 months later here I am, totally gluten free but unsure if I’m improving. I have good days and I have bad days and because I started taking Imodium every day and haven’t been able to stop without experiencing withdrawal (which apparently happens since it’s an opiate...I was clueless to this) I literally don’t know how I’m doing, I ont have diarrhea anymore but I’m taking an anti diarrheal so who knows. The people around me are telling me I seem better (more energized, sick less often, generally happier). As someone who struggles with a lot of mental health issues (depression, health phobias, anxiety) I honestly can’t tell. I’m still experiencing issues with going to the bathroom. Sometimes my stool is mucousy or seems to be full of undigested food. I’m not gaining weight or losing it (at least). On the other hand I I have days where I feel very well. I’ve continued to consume dairy, soy and really everything else. I guess I’m just looking for some advice, I’m so tired of feeling sick, I don’t feel like the person I used to be and I don’t feel like I have the support of my doctors or really any resources for this. I’m happy to never consume gluten again if it means I’ll feel generally well. Also, how long should it normally take for me to feel well again on the gluten free diet? If anyone has any tips, personal stories of success or really any insight for me that would be immensely helpful. Id also like to mention so you guys have all the info that some of my initial symptoms included headaches (often), mouth sores (canker sores), more hair coming out in the shower (I thought I was crazy but seriously I was losing hair), skin issues, and just a general malaise as well as bloating, gas and nausea. Thank you you so much in advance and sorry for the kinda gross information I shared. Regards, Kathryn.
  9. Celiac.com 08/08/2018 - A number of studies have cataloged the numerous challenges faced by adolescents with celiac disease attempting to comply with a gluten-free diet. A team of researchers recently set out to reevaluate gluten-free dietary compliance and the current clinical condition of 123 now teenage celiac patients, who were diagnosed in the first three years of life and were followed up for at least 10 years to determine whether a less strict approach to a gluten-free diet can actually increase gluten-free dietary compliance. The research team included M Mayer, L Greco, R Troncone, S Auricchio, and M N Marsh. They are variously affiliated with the University Department of Medicine, Hope Hospital, Salford, Manchester, UK. The team used computerized image analysis to assess mucosal structure and lymphocytes in small intestinal biopsy specimens obtained from 36 subjects. Of these adolescents with celiac disease, 65% were adhering to a strict gluten free diet, 11.4% followed a gluten-free diet with occasional gluten intake, while nearly 25% ate a gluten containing diet. Patients on a gluten containing diet had more frequent clinical gluten-related symptoms, while patients on a semi-strict diet did not. Occasional intake of small amounts (0-06-2 g/day) of gluten did not produce increased concentrations of anti-gliadin antibodies, but did result in a substantially greater crypt epithelial volume and expanded crypt intraepithelial lymphocyte numbers. So, could a semi-strict gluten-free diet benefit celiac teenagers who eat a gluten containing diet? These numbers suggest that a semi-strict gluten-free diet may be better than no gluten-free diet at all. Of course, the best choice would always be a 100% gluten-free diet. Source: Gut
  10. Hi all, I was diagnosed with both Celiac and Microscopic Colitis (Callogenous) last year, and while I'm feeling largely better, I've never been able to find a succinct and ready-to-go guide for people with MC and Celiac, and am having an especially hard time finding one that is friendly for vegetarians. Any advice, links, or reads that anyone might have would be greatly appreciated!
  11. Celiac.com 07/18/2018 - Despite many studies on immune development in children, there still isn’t much good data on how a mother’s diet during pregnancy and infancy influences a child’s immune development. A team of researchers recently set out to assess whether changes in maternal or infant diet might influence the risk of allergies or autoimmune disease. The team included Vanessa Garcia-Larsen, Despo Ierodiakonou, Katharine Jarrold, Sergio Cunha, Jennifer Chivinge, Zoe Robinson, Natalie Geoghegan, Alisha Ruparelia, Pooja Devani, Marialena Trivella, Jo Leonardi-Bee, and Robert J. Boyle. They are variously associated with the Department of Undiagnosed Celiac Disease More Common in Women and Girls International Health, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America; the Respiratory Epidemiology, Occupational Medicine and Public Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; the Section of Paediatrics, Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; the Centre for Statistics in Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; the Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom; the Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom; and Stanford University in the USA. Team members searched MEDLINE, Excerpta Medica dataBASE (EMBASE), Web of Science, Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and Literatura Latino Americana em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS) for observational studies conducted between January 1946 and July 2013, and interventional studies conducted through December 2017, that evaluated the relationship between diet during pregnancy, lactation, or the first year of life, and future risk of allergic or autoimmune disease. They then selected studies, extracted data, and assessed bias risk. They evaluated data using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE). They found 260 original studies, covering 964,143 participants, of milk feeding, including 1 intervention trial of breastfeeding promotion, and 173 original studies, covering 542,672 participants, of other maternal or infant dietary exposures, including 80 trials of 26 maternal, 32 infant, or 22 combined interventions. They found a high bias risk in nearly half of the more than 250 milk feeding studies and in about one-quarter of studies of other dietary exposures. Evidence from 19 intervention trials suggests that oral supplementation with probiotics during late pregnancy and lactation may reduce risk of eczema. 44 cases per 1,000; 95% CI 20–64), and 6 trials, suggest that fish oil supplementation during pregnancy and lactation may reduce risk of allergic sensitization to egg. GRADE certainty of these findings was moderate. The team found less evidence, and low GRADE certainty, for claims that breastfeeding reduces eczema risk during infancy, that longer exclusive breastfeeding is associated with reduced type 1 diabetes mellitus, and that probiotics reduce risk of infants developing allergies to cow’s milk. They found no evidence that dietary exposure to other factors, including prebiotic supplements, maternal allergenic food avoidance, and vitamin, mineral, fruit, and vegetable intake, influence risk of allergic or autoimmune disease. Overall, the team’s findings support a connection between the mother’s diet and risk of immune-mediated diseases in the child. Maternal probiotic and fish oil supplementation may reduce risk of eczema and allergic sensitization to food, respectively. Stay tuned for more on diet during pregnancy and its role in celiac disease. Source: PLoS Med. 2018 Feb; 15(2): e1002507. doi: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1002507
  12. I was diagnosed with celiac disease four years ago (through a biopsy and blood test). I immediately stopped eating gluten and have followed a rigid gluten-free diet ever since (I sometimes eat at restaurants and cafés but am always careful when I do). Around the same time (i.e. four years ago) I started having occasional rashes on my tush. I had previously had rashes on my elbows and knees that were thought to be eczema. The progression usually goes like this: an itchy red bump, followed by a raised yellowish blister (also itchy), spreading to a more diffuse pink splotch, finishing with a dark red scab, and then healing. I have always noticed that this usually occurs symmetrically on my body. Eventually it started appearing on my knuckles and fingers, and occasionally on my back and stomach. About a year ago it started to appear fairly intensely on my scalp. At night the itching (especially on my backside) wakes me up. I went to the GP several times and received a variety of possible diagnoses (rarely with any degree of certainty): eczema, fungus, scabies, herpes. I was swabbed for herpes three times with negative results each time. I was prescribed a variety of creams and topical steroids, none of which really worked, except that the steroid (Eumovate) does reduce the itching. More recently I've been using an essential oil mixture that also seems to help the itching. I occasionally get periods of remission, often when I travel, and most recently when I had the flu and my skin cleared up completely for a week. I'm never able to really identify anything different in my diet during these periods of remission. At one point the herbalist put me on the Gaps diet, which I did for a couple months with limited success. My questions are these: 1) are there other people here who have adopted a strict gluten-free diet but still have DH? 2) my GP told me that even though I have been gluten-free for a long time, a biopsy of my skin would still give good results, because I have active symptoms. Does anyone have experience with this? I'm open to any other advice and information people would like to add. I've been reading this part of the forum and have already learned a lot. Thanks
  13. I'll try to keep this short. My daughter has always been in the lower percentile on weight since she was about 1 years old. She was born a healthy size but the first week we had her, we had to return to the hospital and have her stay under some UV lights because of Jaundice. She's always been a picky eater, and she always wants to drink something instead of eat. I started to take notice of her stool. Even as a baby her stool was always a light color, almost off-white or pale yellow. It was runny that way, or even perfectly formed it was pale and yellow. My wife didn't really see anything to be concerned about. When she turned three and she continued to be lower on the weight chart, and her stool consistently was this weird pale color, I basically convinced my wife to get a blood test done. Also, our child's behavior was incredibly bad. She had mood swings, tantrums, uncontrollable crying for no reason. It was hell. After the test, she tested TTG IGA over 100, which was almost a confirmation of Celiac. Relief, we finally figured out the issue. We quickly switched her to a gluten free diet and she started to see minimal improvements, then sometimes she would have a normal stool (brown, healthy) and she seemed better, but then as if for no reason she would go right back to having weird mood and her stool went back to being yellow and pale. She's almost 4 years old now and she's been "Gluten free" since October of 2017. She's had maybe a week of improvement but she continues to have symptoms of pale stool, gas, irritability, poor sleep, attitude, tantrums, bad behavior etc. She never once complains that her tummy hurts, but she still doesn't like to eat. We monitor what food we give her, but I'm starting to worry that there is something else going on. She doesn't have jaundice, it's very clear that she doesn't. Her eyes are bright white and her skin is normal, her urine is clear to yellow. She has tons of energy and is happy for the most part, but she is prone to wild mood swings and is very defiant. She is also very smart and learns very quickly, but something is gnawing at the back of my head that something is very wrong with her and I can't sleep well at night. Basically I just want to know if there are any other people out there that suffer with this or have a child with this that see this kind of "relapse" in symptoms even after going gluten free. We even eliminated dairy in fear that it was also causing issues and she continues to have problems. We make her food every day and avoid cross contamination and it doesn't seem to make a difference. Maybe it's the products we're feeding her? The gluten free bread or Vans waffles? Maple syrup? Peanut butter?
  14. Celiac.com 04/20/2017 - More people than ever are following a gluten-free diet, but does the diet carry health risks that could cause harm in the long run? That's a very possible scenario, according to a report published in the journal Epidemiology. The report presents strong data to suggest that numerous gluten-free food staples contain high levels of toxic metals, which means that many gluten-free eaters could face higher risks for cancer and other chronic illnesses. Moreover, the US studies both reveal that people who follow a gluten-free diet have twice as much arsenic in their urine as those who eat a non-gluten-free diet. They also have 70 per cent more mercury in their blood, along with high levels of other toxic metals, such as lead and cadmium. Clearly the report invites further study to determine if these potentially negative effects are merely statistical, or if they are actually represented in corresponding numbers of gluten-free dieters. So, look for more study to see if people eating gluten-free are actually having higher rates of cancer and other toxic metal-related disorders. Meantime, you may be able to mitigate negative effects of a gluten-free diet by choosing products with lower levels of toxic metals. California-grown rice, for example seems to have lower levels compared to Chinese rice. If you follow a gluten-free diet for medical reasons, keep an eye out for symptoms related to toxic metal exposure, and consult a doctor if you think you are experiencing such symptoms. Read more at: Celiac.com. Does a Gluten-free Diet Mean Higher Arsenic and Mercury Levels? Read more at The Daily Mail.
  15. I mentioned in an earlier post that I was going to try a gluten-free meal delivery service. I chose Trifecta Nutrition because they said that all of their foods are "100% gluten free" with "no chance of cross contamination". I chose their Paleo Plan because I also need to lose some weight. I started it today and ate the Salmon with Asian Vegetables. All I had to do was put it in the microwave for 3 minutes and it was ready. It tasted pretty good and the portion size was plenty. For dinner I will have Garlic Veggies with Caramelized Onions with Diced Beef. Looks good. Hopefully tastes just as good as it looks. I know there was one person interested in this and I saw that there was 344 view as on now so I'll describe the food, any reactions I may have, and how the overall diet is working. I'm not trying to sell anyone on Trifecta, it's just the one that I chose. It is a bit pricey at $149.00 for 10 meals. If it all works out maybe I'll try a cheaper service but that 100% gluten-free claim got me. Check in from time to time if you're interested. I'll out up a few posts every few days unless something happens.
  16. Celiac.com 03/16/2018 - Celiac awareness has increased exponentially over the last decade among physicians and the general public alike. Increasing numbers of research publications and very active support groups and individuals have contributed to this growing awareness. Knowledge of the many and varied manifestations is also growing rapidly although some individuals continue to cling to the notion that celiac disease is characterized by malabsorption and that nutrient deficiency is the dominant feature of this ailment. This misses the broader understanding of the many ways in which gluten grains negatively impact on human health. From toes to head, any and all of our human body systems may be harmed by ingesting gluten under some circumstances. Although the wide range of signs and symptoms of celiac disease is impressive, a similar, even broader range of impacts may be attributed to gluten in the context of non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Those with celiac disease only comprise a small portion of the population of people who are afflicted by non celiac gluten sensitivity. Dr. Rodney Ford has offered the all encompassing term of 'gluten syndrome' to identify everyone whose health is compromised by gluten consumption (1). From Dr. Fasano's most conservative estimate that 6% of the population is afflicted by non-celiac gluten sensitivity (2), to Dr. Rodney Ford's estimate that 10% is afflicted (3), to Dr. Kenneth Fine's finding that IgG class anti-gliadin antibodies are found in about 11% of the population (4), to this writer's assertion that non-celiac gluten sensitivity includes well more than 20% of the population, the paucity of research in this area offers a wide range of estimates without a solid basis for refuting any of them. Nonetheless, it is clear that those with non-celiac gluten sensitivity outnumber those with celiac disease by a ratio of somewhere between 6 to 1 and more than 20 to 1. The gluten syndrome may therefore include from seven percent to more than twenty percent of the population. The importance of these percentages and ratios is that we are seeing growth in the diagnosis of celiac disease, and in the number of people who have celiac disease (4). It has been argued that a similar trend may be seen across the spectrum of the gluten syndrome, attributing that trend to the genetic modifications that have been made to grains, and the increased consumption of these foods (5). But this is just the tip of the iceberg. Dr. Fasano bases his estimate of non-celiac gluten sensitivity on those who mount an innate immune reaction to gluten grains. While there is likely some overlap between innate immune reactions and selective antibody reactions, most estimates of non-celiac gluten sensitivity are based on IgG class antibodies against one of the proteins of several protein families found in gluten. It makes eminent sense to me that when our bodies are mounting a measurable immune response against the most common food in our diets, whether the reaction is by the innate immune system or by creating selective antibodies, that food might be harmful to our health. I do not quarrel with the basis on which these sensitivities are identified. I simply argue that they are only identifying a sub-fraction of many more possible cases of non-celiac gluten sensitivity. To put this issue into sharper focus, there are several protein families to be found in each of the gluten grains. In wheat, for instance, each family, glutelin, gliadin, and glutenin contains a number of individual proteins. The antibody test for gliadin ignores possible reactions to proteins in either of the other two families. Further, IgG class antibodies are the most common and widespread class of selective antibody we produce. But they form only one of five types of selective antibodies (known as immunoglobulins). Further, as is obvious from Dr. Fasano's conservative approach to identifying non-celiac gluten sensitivity, there are other facets of the immune system that do not involve selective antibodies, and can also be enlisted in a reaction against gluten grains. Thus, when we test for IgG anti-gliadin antibodies, the most common test for non-celiac gluten sensitivity, positive results are identifying reactions against only one of the several protein families found in gluten, and only one of the five possible selective antibody reactions against this single protein family. It therefore seems wholly improbable that testing for reactions against a single protein family in only a single class of selective antibody would identify all or even most cases of gluten sensitivity. Admittedly, some researchers test for IgA antibodies but those investigators usually do not test for IgG antibodies. However, even with testing for both classes of selective antibodies, which most published reports on this issue have not done, it is clear that many possible immune reactions to any other protein fractions of gluten might well be overlooked, either in the form of other selective antibodies or as other immune reactions and various innate reactions against gluten grains. I'm sure that, by now, the reader will see that there are many possible immune reactions against this most common food, and that most of these reactions will go undetected, both in the context of standard medical testing and in most research conducted in this venue. On a more practical plane, when Dr. Curtis Dohan identified significant improvements among patients with schizophrenia patients eating a gluten-free, dairy-free diet (6), and Singh and Kay replicated their findings (7), many looked for celiac disease among patients with schizophrenia and found only a small increase. Dohan and Singh's publications were followed by several sloppy studies that ignored the guiding principles expressed in this pioneering work. These weak studies further undermined acceptance of the connection between gluten and schizophrenia. The net result was a growing belief that Dohan had erred and his heroic work was widely dismissed. Yet, more than twenty years after his death, one of Dohan's most vigorous critics is listed among the authors of a paper that reports an immune reaction against gluten that, while different from the reaction seen in celiac disease, is common among people with schizophrenia (8). Similarly, I think that we can expect, sometime in the future, to see research that identifies immune reactions and damaging dynamics caused by gluten consumption among people with learning disabilities. There is, for instance, one newspaper report of an informal study conducted at the Nunnykirk School in Northumberland, a school that serves only children with dyslexia, a condition that is reported to afflict about 10% of children in the United Kingdom. After six months of eating a gluten free diet, more than 80% of these children improved their reading at a rate of at least twice that of normal children. Some leaped ahead, in their reading skills, by as much as 2.5 years over this six month period (9). Relatedly, I had the privilege of working with Dr. Rodney Ford on a retrospective analysis of indicators of school readiness among children who had celiac disease, non-celiac gluten sensitivity (as measured by selective antibody testing) and children who showed no signs of either reaction to gluten. A large majority of those who reacted to gluten improved dramatically. There was a small but significant sub-group whose school readiness improved following a gluten free diet, and these improvements happened within 6 months of avoiding gluten (unpublished data). Autism, especially where normal development was curtailed after one or several years, is another condition in which excluding gluten seems to provide substantial improvements even in the absence of celiac disease. Some research in this area suggests that toxins (generated by bacteria resident in the intestines) are allowed access to the bloodstream and the brain (10). Perhaps exclusion of dietary gluten is the factor that limits access to the bloodstream through reducing zonulin production. Similarly, although not as well supported, there is some evidence to suggest that gluten contributes to bi-polar disorder. Just how frequent and significant the contribution may be is still open to debate, but I have observed some evidence to support this hypothesis in my own family. A range of types of epilepsy have been found in association with celiac disease, many of which are mitigated by the gluten free diet (11). The manifestations of undetected non-celiac gluten sensitivity are not limited to brain function. We know that celiac disease is much more frequent in the context of other autoimmune diseases. We also know that antibody tests show even higher rates of non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Since we are only identifying a fraction of those who may be reacting to gluten, it seems reasonable to suggest that everyone with an autoimmune disease, or antibodies suggesting that an autoimmune disease is imminent, should begin a strict gluten free diet and follow it for at least one year. If there is any reduction of auto-antibodies or symptoms of autoimmunity, the diet should be continued. Although difficult in the early stages, it is an entirely benign intervention/treatment. There are no unwanted side effects or hazards. There are more than 200 autoimmune and other medical conditions reported in association with gluten and are listed in Appendix D of Dangerous Grains (12). In each case, a lengthy trial of a gluten free diet would be well advised. Again, there are no negative side effects of the gluten free diet. It is an entirely benign intervention. A significant proportion of those who suffer from IBS, Crohn's or any of the various types of colitis have also been reported to benefit from a gluten free diet on various websites. Similarly, many people with MS and a host of other neurological diseases have been shown to benefit from a gluten free diet (13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23). Even many AIDS patients are helped by a gluten free diet. It reduces their diarrhea and improves nutrient absorption (24). This is an important discovery that can be harnessed in conjunction with the improved treatments now available for this very serious illness. Overweight, obesity, and weight loss are contentious issues with regard to the gluten free diet. Until quite recently, there were two reports of small studies of changes in body mass index in the USA and one report from Ireland, following institution of a gluten free diet. The two American studies showed weight loss among overweight subjects on a gluten free diet. The study from Ireland showed only weight gain among overweight subjects after following a gluten free diet. In November of 2011, another small study was published. Their conclusion states "The GFD (gluten free diet) has a beneficial effect upon the BMI (body mass index) of overweight children with celiac disease" (25), which is congruent with the earlier two American studies. I have previously suggested that the discrepancy between the findings may be due to the acceptance of wheat starch as part of the gluten free diet in the United Kingdom. However, regardless of the cause, the preponderance of evidence supports the notion that a gluten free diet can be used as an effective weight loss strategy in some cases of celiac disease. Other evidence suggests it may be a more broadly effective weight loss tool. Thus, my estimate of the prevalence of non-celiac gluten sensitivity includes the 6% who show signs of innate immune reactions to gluten, in addition to those who show IgG antibodies against gluten, at about 11% of the population (although there may be some overlap between these 6% and 11% groups). My estimate also includes many of those with schizophrenia who number about 1% of the general population, and a portion of those with autism who are quickly approaching 1% of the population. I am also including 80% of the approximately 10% of the population with some degree of dyslexia. Because of overlaps between groups, and because gluten's impact is often only demonstrable through a gluten free diet, I only assert that non-celiac gluten sensitivity is a factor in more than 20% of the general population. However, I remain open to findings that will show a much greater negative impact from eating foods derived from gluten grains. The portion of the human population that may be negatively impacted by gluten consumption can range as high as the 80% portion that produce haptaglobin 2, for which zonulin is the precursor. The take away point here is that the gluten free diet may aid overall health for up to as much as 80% of the general population. In that context, my estimate that 20+% of the population is showing signs that they are variously mounting immune reactions against gluten or are otherwise harmed by gluten appears modest. The overlapping symptoms make it extremely difficult to narrow my estimate further. Nonetheless, gluten is one of the most harmful substances in our diet. Yet it is the most ubiquitous factor in our diets. Sources: 1. www.doctorgluten.com 2. Sapone A, Lammers KM, Casolaro V, Cammarota M, Giuliano MT, De Rosa M, Stefanile R, Mazzarella G, Tolone C, Russo MI, Esposito P, Ferraraccio F, Cartenì M, Riegler G, de Magistris L, Fasano A. Divergence of gut permeability and mucosal immune gene expression in two gluten-associated conditions: celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. BMC Med. 2011 Mar 9;9:23. 3. personal communication 4. personal communication 5. Wheat Belly 6. Dohan FC, Grasberger JC. Relapsed schizophrenics: earlier discharge from the hospital after cereal-free, milk-free diet. Am J Psychiatry. 1973 Jun;130(6):685-8. 7. Singh & Kay 8. Samaroo D, Dickerson F, Kasarda DD, Green PH, Briani C, Yolken RH, Alaedini A. Novel immune response to gluten in individuals with schizophrenia. Schizophr Res. 2010 May;118(1-3):248-55. 9. Blair, Alexandra. Wheat-free diet gives food for thought. http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/article444290.ece 10. Sandler RH, Finegold SM, Bolte ER, Buchanan CP, Maxwell AP, Väisänen ML, Nelson MN, Wexler HM. Short-term benefit from oral vancomycin treatment of regressive-onset autism. J Child Neurol. 2000 Jul;15(7):429-35. 11. Ribaldone DG, Astegiano M, Fagoonee S, Rizzetto M, Pellicano R. Epilepsy and celiac disease: review of literature. Panminerva Med. 2011 Dec;53(4):213-6. 12. Braly J, Hoggan R, Dangerous Grains. Avery, New York, 2002. 13. Hadjivassiliou M, Sanders DS, Grünewald RA, Woodroofe N, Boscolo S, Aeschlimann D. Gluten sensitivity: from gut to brain. Lancet Neurol. 2010 Mar;9(3):318-30. 14. Turner MR, Chohan G, Quaghebeur G, Greenhall RC, Hadjivassiliou M, Talbot K. A case of celiac disease mimicking amyotrophic lateral scl Nat Clin Pract Neurol. 2007 Oct;3(10):581-4. 15. Hadjivassiliou M, Chattopadhyay AK, Grünewald RA, Jarratt JA, Kandler RH, Rao DG, Sanders DS, Wharton SB, Davies-Jones GA. Myopathy associated with gluten sensitivity. Muscle Nerve. 2007 Apr;35(4):443-50. 16. Hadjivassiliou M, Grünewald RA, Kandler RH, Chattopadhyay AK, Jarratt JA, Sanders DS, Sharrack B, Wharton SB, Davies-Jones GA. Neuropathy associated with gluten sensitivity. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2006 Nov;77(11):1262-6. Epub 2006 Jul 11. 17. Hadjivassiliou M, Sanders DS, Grünewald RA. Multiple sclerosis and occult gluten sensitivity. Neurology. 2005 Mar 8;64(5):933-4; author reply 933-4. 18. Hadjivassiliou M, Williamson CA, Woodroofe N. The immunology of gluten sensitivity: beyond the gut. Trends Immunol. 2004 Nov;25(11):578-82. Review. 19. Hadjivassiliou M, Sanders DS, Grünewald RA, Akil M. Gluten sensitivity masquerading as systemic lupus erythematosus. Ann Rheum Dis. 2004 Nov;63(11):1501-3. 20. Hadjivassiliou M, Grünewald RA, Davies-Jones GA. Gluten sensitivity as a neurological illness. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2002 May;72(5):560-3. 21. Hadjivassiliou M, Grünewald RA, Lawden M, Davies-Jones GA, Powell T, Smith CM. Headache and CNS white matter abnormalities associated with gluten sensitivity. Neurology. 2001 Feb 13;56(3):385-8. 22. Hadjivassiliou M, Grünewald RA, Davies-Jones GA. Gluten sensitivity: a many headed hydra. BMJ. 1999 Jun 26;318(7200):1710-1. 23. Hadjivassiliou M, Gibson A, Davies-Jones GA, Lobo AJ, Stephenson TJ, Milford-Ward A. Does cryptic gluten sensitivity play a part in neurological illness? Lancet. 1996 Feb 10;347(8998):369-71. 24. Quiñones-Galvan A, Lifshitz-Guinzberg A, Ruíz-Arguelles GJ. Gluten-free diet for AIDS-associated enteropathy. Ann Intern Med. 1990 Nov 15;113(10):806-7. 25. Reilly NR, Aguilar K, Hassid BG, Cheng J, Defelice AR, Kazlow P, Bhagat G, Green PH. Celiac disease in normal-weight and overweight children: clinical features and growth outcomes following a gluten-free diet. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2011 Nov;53(5):528-31. 26. Cheng J, Brar PS, Lee AR, Green PH. Body mass index in celiac disease: beneficial effect of a gluten-free diet. J Clin Gastroenterol. 2010 Apr;44(4):267-71. 27. Murray JA, Watson T, Clearman B, Mitros F. Effect of a gluten-free diet on gastrointestinal symptoms in celiac disease. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Apr;79(4):669-73.
  17. Celiac.com 02/15/2018 - If you don't follow Premier League football, or soccer, as it's known in the States, then you can be excused for missing the recent news that Arsenal midfielder Jack Wilshere is touting a gluten-free diet that, he says, has put him in "the best shape of his career." After being plagued by injuries the last few years, Wilshire told the London Evening Standard that he has been "dairy and gluten-free now for six weeks." He says he looks and feels better, and is a bit leaner after dropping a bit of weight. Most importantly, Wilshire says he feels "sharper and quicker on the pitch…like [he] can last longer." For example, at the end of the Chelsea game when we scored the second goal, I felt, "Come on, we can go on again here." I was pressing them and felt good."I know my body well, I know the right foods to eat and the best way to recover. I'm also getting the right amount of sleep."I've learned that over the years and I think I'm in the best shape I have ever been." Wilshere starred in a thrilling 2-2 draw at home to Chelsea on Wednesday, opening the scoring with a thumping close-range finish. That draw saw Wilshere play his sixth consecutive full Premier League match. Of course, even bearing in mind Jack Wilshire's effusive claims, there is simply no good scientific evidence to support the idea that a gluten-free diet can improve physical fitness in people who do not have celiac disease, or some other medical intolerance to gluten. Still, this is likely not the last such story we will hear about the perceived benefits of a gluten-free diet. Source: IrishExaminer.com
  18. My daughter was diagnosed with Celiac via endoscopy/biopsy and had other indicators such as blood counts and vitamin/mineral deficiencies. At first, it seemed that she was incredibly sensitive to any cross contamination. Now, several years later and well into recovery, she has gotten accidentally glutened several times with seemingly no adverse effects. Is that even possible? Could the initial diagnosis have been incorrect? Or once the gut has healed, can a Celiac sometimes tolerate occasional exposures better? Thank you for your insights.
  19. Celiac.com 02/02/2018 - An opinion article by Dr. Di Sabatino and Dr. Corazza in the February 2012 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine (1) has unleashed a storm of opinion articles in the popular media that decry the gluten-free diet. The article by these two physicians is mostly reasonable and thoughtful but there are a couple of problems with it. The authors devalue patients' participation in their own health care and implicitly assert that gluten is a healthy food for most people. They do so through a protocol they have devised and by stating that they wish to prevent "a gluten preoccupation from evolving into the conviction that gluten is toxic for most of the population" (1). This statement, and the media claims that followed, reflect several deeply flawed assumptions and perspectives that are not only unscientific, they elevate the physician's observations over the individual's insights into her/his own health. The first assumption, of course, is that gluten is a healthy food for all those without celiac disease. Yet in the very same article, Di Sabatino and Corazza offer a list of afflictions that, in the absence of celiac disease, improve or completely disappear when gluten is withdrawn. Thus, while they acknowledge the existence of these illnesses, they simultaneously assert that a condition of gluten preoccupation exists and that gluten is not toxic for most of the population. They go on to bemoan the absence of clear diagnostic criteria for these non-celiac, gluten-induced illnesses, calling for an individualized approach to diagnosis that would involve patients following a single-blinded gluten challenge test for subjective symptoms and an open test for objective signs and symptoms. In a nutshell, they want patients to undergo a gluten challenge, without knowing (the patient is the one who is blinded) when they are or are not gluten-free, to confirm, for the physician, the patient's claim that her/his symptoms are legitimately linked to gluten ingestion. The gluten challenge is for the sole benefit of the physician. If she/he observes that the signs and/or symptoms worsen with gluten exposure and/or improve after excluding gluten then the physician will be reassured that the patient's self-report is accurate. Does that strike anyone else as a trifle offensive? Of course, this assumes that the physician's tests and observations are somehow more valid than the patient's complaints. I don't want to be too cranky about this. After all, I'm a pretty skeptical person and I think it is important to resist random claims, especially about dietary restrictions, without supporting evidence. But honestly, when an individual is seeking medical advice and reports on their signs and symptoms, there seems little cause to doubt that patient's word. After all, if they misrepresent the facts they are only hurting themselves. Patients can, of course, be mistaken. And those who are interested in a physician's diagnosis might want to subject themselves to such a paternalistic gluten challenge. I have no quarrel with patients making that informed choice. Perhaps some patients will have conditions imposed by their insurance company. Or maybe they will have some other reason to accept this protocol. However, it should not be overlooked that, at its root, this protocol is the antithesis of encouraging patients to take responsibility for their own health care. Further, despite their implied disdain for patients, Doctors Di Sabatino and Corazza don't seem to have considered some of the risks involved in their newly hatched diagnostic protocol which is aimed at pushing back against what they seem to believe is a growing idea that "gluten is toxic for most of the population". In brief, they advocate patients resuming gluten consumption, thus incurring several serious risks to the health and welfare of the patient so physicians may stem the growing tide of gluten-free patients who have undertaken the diet without the blessing of a gastroenterologist or physician. Please take a moment to consider this proposition. The gluten-free diet is restrictive, inconvenient, and expensive. Why would anyone choose to follow such a diet without being convinced that it was valuable to them? Di Sabatino and Corazzo freely acknowledge that there is a dearth of diagnostic tests and protocols for diagnosing or excluding non-celiac gluten sensitivity (although they do overlook some basic tests that I'll discuss shortly). The inconvenience of a gluten-free diet should disabuse critics and skeptics of much of their doubt. However, even if this huge factor is ignored, there are issues of opioid addiction, appetite manipulation, and the risks of triggering allergies, chronic inflammation, autoimmune disease, and psychiatric illness, any or all of which can accompany ingestion of gluten in some individuals. All of these costs and risks are ignored by these two innovators in their Brave New World of non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Addiction to Gluten-derived Opioids Most of the people I know who follow a gluten-free diet are well aware of how addictive gluten can be. Once a person has broken away from an addictive substance, it seems very questionable, to say the least, to persuade them, ostensibly in the interests of their health, to ingest that addictive substance again. Since 1979, we have had solid evidence of the morphine-like peptides of gluten grains (2). Many subsequent reports have replicated the findings first reported by Christine Zioudrou and her colleagues (3, 4, 5, 6) so there is little cause to question the addictive potential of gluten grains and the foods derived from them. How wise would it be to ask a former smoker to do a trial of smoking cigarettes for a few weeks? Or to ask an alcoholic to return to alcohol to reassure his physician of the correctness of the patient's choice to quit? Appetite Manipulation Relatedly, an opioid blocker, Naloxone, was given to a group of binge eaters who experienced reduced "duration and magnitude of binge eating episodes" (7). Another group, of healthy volunteers, showed 28% reductions in food intake on days when they were given the same opioid blocker (8). Although gluten opioids were not the intended target of the Naloxone, it may be that this was exactly what this drug was doing in both of these studies. As the obesity epidemic spreads, it is increasingly important to exercise care with respect to foods that cause abnormal and unwarranted increases in appetite. Other researchers have also reported reductions in food intake after administration of opioid blocking medications (9, 10). Autoimmunity Although obesity is an important health concern, autoimmune disease may be of at least equal concern. The loss of integrity of the mucosal barrier of the small intestine is now considered an important factor in the development of many cases of autoimmunity (11, 12). This group of ailments currently plagues the western world with their serious, sometimes lethal consequences. Especially among those who report symptoms in association with gluten consumption, it seems only prudent to proceed with an abundance of caution. When there may be an increased risk of developing one or more autoimmune diseases, a return to gluten consumption seems a very poor choice. In susceptible individuals, gluten consumption triggers zonulin production. Zonulin mediates the tight junctions between the epithelial cells that form the protective barrier between the digesting food in our intestines, and our bloodstreams (11). Thus, ingesting gluten , for those at risk, invites leakage of undigested and partly digested proteins into the bloodstream. The immune system sees these foreign substances as invaders and attacks them in the same manner it would attack a viral or bacterial invader. These same antibodies sometimes attack self tissues with similar protein structures. Because gluten is ingested each day, several times a day, this leaky gut and flood of antibodies can quickly become chronic. Why would a caring health-care professional advise someone who is reporting symptoms associated with gluten consumption to return to eating this substance when the patient may well be reporting early signs and symptoms of a developing autoimmune disease? Allergies and Inflammation Similarly, a compromised intestinal mucosa has been connected to allergies and chronic inflammation. It seems irresponsible to bring one's professional authority to bear on the patient, encouraging them to return to eating gluten so the physician may be persuaded that the patient is accurately reporting their responses to gluten. At the Department of Neurology at the Royal Hallamshire Hospital in Sheffield, U.K., a group of researchers have been reporting, since the mid 1990s, the identification of elevated serum IgG antibodies against one of the proteins in gluten among a majority of patients with a variety of neurological diseases of unknown origins (13). They also report that the prognosis is quite poor for these people. I attended a presentation by the lead researcher of this group, Dr. Marios Hadjivassiliou, in 2005. He repeatedly stated that these individuals require an exceedingly strict gluten-free diet to have any chance of improving their prognosis. Yet doctors Di Sabatino and Corazza's approach would further compromise these patients' chances of recovery to satisfy the doubts held by physicians. The research group at the Royal Hallamshire Hospital, and many other researchers, continue to use testing for IgG and IgA class antibodies against gliadin, a sub-group of gluten proteins, as an indicator of gluten sensitivity (13). It may be imperfect, but any time a particular food protein is triggering an abnormal immune response in our bodies, it seems reasonable to assert that this individual is sensitive to that food protein. When celiac disease has been ruled out, positive IgG and/or IgA anti-gliadin antibodies clearly indicate a condition of non-celiac gluten sensitivity. There are other forms of non-celiac gluten sensitivity that may be missed by these tests, but it is clear that IgG and IgA testing for anti-gliadin antibodies is identifying some, perhaps most, cases of non-celiac gluten sensitivity. About 12% of the general population shows elevated levels of IgG antibodies against gluten (13, 14). Notwithstanding Di Sabatino and Corazza's assertion that there are no tests for non-celiac gluten sensitivity, IgG and IgA anti-gliadin antibody tests are certainly one means of identifying gluten sensitivity, whether in the blood or in fecal matter. Additional markers may well arise from current and future research. Psychiatric Illnesses Some forty years ago, Dr. Curtis Dohan and his colleagues established a clear connection between gluten and dairy proteins and schizophrenia (15). Doctors Singh and Kay replicated those findings (16). The issue was hotly debated on the basis of several other studies of sloppy design that followed. For a long time, the connection with gluten was dismissed because of the contradictory reports in the medical literature. In the last fifteen years, another spate of research has emerged showing that Dr. Dohan, Dr. Singh, and both of their research groups had unearthed a compelling connection with serious implications for the effective treatment of a sub-group of patients with schizophrenia and other mental illnesses. Some of these findings were capricious, as in the case of a long-term schizophrenic who was placed on a ketogenic diet. After 53 years of battling her symptoms she experienced complete relief from her schizophrenia (17). Genetic studies and investigations of schizophrenic patients and bi-polar patients have also shown that gluten may be an important factor in these conditions (18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 ) which are both common and debilitating. A subset of autistic patients have also experienced symptom improvement on a gluten-free diet (25, 26, 27). Thus, there is compelling evidence across a number of specialty areas of human illness in which gluten plays a role as an important contributor to symptoms and/or it lies at the root of these conditions. I must therefore question how Dr. Di Sabatino and Dr. Corazza can assert that gluten is not toxic to most people? Their implicit claim to that effect is questionable given the wide range illnesses that it contributes to or causes. We now know that increased production of zonulin, the mediator of intestinal barrier integrity, discovered at the University of Maryland in 2000 (28), is triggered, in some people, by gluten ingestion (29). Subsequent research has revealed that zonulin is the precursor of haptoglobin 2 which is found in about 80% of the human population (11). In the absence of further research, there may well be cause to suspect that gluten grains are a healthy food for only about 20% of the population. So these two physicians would have us continue to consume gluten until such time as we develop full-blown illness or signs and symptoms acceptable to our physicians. Surely that has put the cart before the horse. Their patients do not visit them for the sole benefit of the physician. Nonetheless that is the central thrust of this protocol. This published opinion has spawned a number of articles online and in the popular press, all of which (that I've seen) seem to ignore all of the concessions to non-celiac gluten sensitivity mentioned in the article by doctors Di Sabatino and Corazza . Some of these spin-off commentaries even use the original article to support their suggestions that a gluten-free diet is inappropriate even for those with symptoms that are relieved by the diet. This blatantly contravenes the opinions expressed by Di Sabatino and Corazza but these journalists don't let the facts get in the way of their over-simplified, august opinions. While I take exception to their implied distrust of patients, at least Di Sabatino and Corazza concede that the gluten-free diet is appropriate for those who experience symptom mitigation or remission when avoiding gluten. These reporters make no such concession. One article from the LA Times, states: "That hasn't stopped many people from declaring they are gluten sensitive, even though they may not be" (30). This journalist seems to imagine that he/she is in a better position to judge whether there is benefit in a gluten-free diet than the people who choose to follow it. Given Di Sabatino and Corazza's flagrant disrespect for patients, I suppose similar disparagement by the journalists who mindlessly follow should not surprise us. They, too, dispense medical advice that could prove very harmful. The quality of that advice is about what one might expect under the circumstances. Doctors Di Sabatino and Corazza not only acknowledge non-celiac gluten sensitivity as a cause for symptoms very similar to those of celiac disease, they call for further research to develop and codify diagnostic protocols that will help clinicians better recognize and treat this newly recognized ailment. They go on to acknowledge that conditions including "headache, lethargy, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, ataxia, or recurrent oral ulceration" in the absence of celiac disease often improve or resolve on a gluten-free diet. Their unfortunate denial of gluten as toxic seems to have invited much of the spin-off, journalistic conjecture under such titles as "Gluten-free diets not always necessary, study suggests" (31). Even the characterization of this opinion article as a study is misleading in the extreme. These journalists and medical opinion authors also seem oblivious to the strong connection between learning disabilities and gluten consumption (32, 33). My own professional experience echoes Blair's report in which 70% to 90% of children with dyslexia accelerated their reading and writing skills more rapidly than mainstream children not afflicted with dyslexia during a six month trial of the gluten-free diet (33). This is startling! In most cases, children with dyslexia work very hard to reduce the gap by which they are falling behind in their studies. In my work it is often difficult to persuade parents of a child who struggles with learning disabilities to undertake a six month trial of a gluten-free diet. Yet the positive results are often quite astounding. The medical opinion expressed by Di Sabatino and Corazza and the subsequent spin-off in the popular press have just made this task substantially more difficult. Who wants to be characterized as a radical nut case? Who wants to risk their child's learning and welfare on a fad diet? These are the accusations implicit in the Di Sabatino and Corazza characterization of "gluten preoccupation" and the journalistic frenzy that followed. One article in The Toronto Star claims that the gluten-free diet is dangerous. Anyone who has followed it knows that claim to be pure nonsense. The article is based on an interview with Dr. Corazza so it is difficult to tell whether the journalist got it wrong or Dr. Corazza actually made this silly claim. The dangers that Dr. Corazza is quoted about are that it will be more difficult to get a diagnosis of celiac disease and that the diet will cost more money (34). Yet the title says " Gluten-free diets could be dangerous, doctors say" (34). What these journalists and physicians missed is the rapidly growing body of evidence showing that increasing numbers of ailments among escalating numbers of people are driven by this ubiquitous food (2-35) . Gluten may or may not be toxic for most of the population. We don't know. We can't know that without more research. Neither can Di Sabatino and Corazza or any of the journalistic lemmings who leaped off that same cliff, asserting that those who take up a gluten-free lifestyle are the ones who are misguided. Regardless of whether gluten is toxic to most of us, a gluten-free diet certainly is not. Just how do Dr. Corazza and/or these journalists imagine that humans survived and thrived before gluten grains were first cultivated about 10,000 years ago? And most of the world's populations survived and thrived without gluten for many more millennia without gluten grains. The growing numbers of people who are willing to accept the inconvenience and expense of a gluten-free diet because of the benefits they experience should incite curiosity and discourse - not contempt and dismissal. Gluten may be toxic to many more people than are currently identifiable by limited available testing. Asserting one side or the other of this argument is at least premature. At most it could prove very harmful to those individuals who listen and obey the voices of experts and journalistic hucksters using devious methods to promote their own pet ideas. Sources: 1. Di Sabatino A, Corazza G. Nonceliac Gluten Sensitivity: Sense or Sensibility? Ann Intern Med. 2012;156:309-311. 2. Zioudrou C, Streaty RA, Klee WA. Opioid peptides derived from food proteins. The exorphins. J Biol Chem. 1979 Apr 10;254(7):2446-9. 3. Fukudome S, Jinsmaa Y, Matsukawa T, Sasaki R, Yoshikawa M. Release of opioid peptides, gluten exorphins by the action of pancreatic elastase. FEBS Lett. 1997 Aug 4;412(3):475-9. 4. Fukudome S, Yoshikawa M. Gluten exorphin C. A novel opioid peptide derived 5. from wheat gluten. FEBS Lett. 1993 Jan 18;316(1):17-9. Fukudome S, Yoshikawa M. Opioid peptides derived from wheat gluten: their isolation and characterization. FEBS Lett. 1992 Jan 13;296(1):107-11. 6. Huebner FR, Lieberman KW, Rubino RP, Wall JS. Demonstration of high opioid-like activity in isolated peptides from wheat gluten hydrolysates. Peptides. 1984 Nov-Dec;5(6):1139-47. 7. Drewnowski A, Krahn DD, Demitrack MA, Nairn K, Gosnell BA. Naloxone, an opiate blocker, reduces the consumption of sweet high-fat foods in obese and lean female binge eaters. Am J Clin Nutr. 1995 Jun;61(6):1206-12. 8. Cohen MR, Cohen RM, Pickar D, Murphy DL. Naloxone reduces food intake in humans. Psychosom Med. 1985 Mar-Apr;47(2):132-8. 9. Wolkowitz OM, Doran AR, Cohen MR, Cohen RM, Wise TN, Pickar D. Single-dose naloxone acutely reduces eating in obese humans: behavioral and biochemical effects. Biol Psychiatry. 1988 Aug;24(4):483-7. 10. Trenchard E, Silverstone T. Naloxone reduces the food intake of normal human volunteers. Appetite. 1983 Mar;4(1):43-50. 11. Tripathi A, Lammers KM, Goldblum S, Shea-Donohue T, Netzel-Arnett S, Buzza MS,Antalis TM, Vogel SN, Zhao A, Yang S, Arrietta MC, Meddings JB, Fasano A. Identification of human zonulin, a physiological modulator of tight junctions, as prehaptoglobin-2. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2009 Sep 29;106(39):16799-804. Epub 2009 Sep 15. 12. Fasano A. Leaky gut and autoimmune diseases. Clin Rev Allergy Immunol. 2012 Feb;42(1):71-8. 13. Hadjivassiliou M, Gibson A, Davies-Jones GA, Lobo AJ, Stephenson TJ, Milford-Ward A. Does cryptic gluten sensitivity play a part in neurological illness? Lancet. 1996 Feb 10;347(8998):369-71. 14. Fine K. Enterolabs. Private communication. 15. Dohan FC, Grasberger JC, Lowell FM, Johnston HT Jr, Arbegast AW. Relapsed schizophrenics: more rapid improvement on a milk- and cereal-free diet. Br J Psychiatry. 1969 May;115(522):595-6. 16. Singh MM, Kay SR. Wheat gluten as a pathogenic factor in schizophrenia. Science. 1976 Jan 30;191(4225):401-2. 17. Kraft BD, Westman EC. Schizophrenia, gluten, and low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diets: a case report and review of the literature. Nutr Metab (Lond). 2009 Feb 26;6:10. 18. Dickerson F, Stallings C, Origoni A, Vaughan C, Khushalani S, Leister F, Yang S, Krivogorsky B, Alaedini A, Yolken R. Markers of gluten sensitivity and celiac disease in recent-onset psychosis and multi-episode schizophrenia. Biol Psychiatry. 2010 Jul 1;68(1):100-4. Epub 2010 May 14. 19. Samaroo D, Dickerson F, Kasarda DD, Green PH, Briani C, Yolken RH, Alaedini A. Novel immune response to gluten in individuals with schizophrenia. Schizophr Res. 2010 May;118(1-3):248-55. Epub 2009 Sep 11. 20. Cascella NG, Kryszak D, Bhatti B, Gregory P, Kelly DL, Mc Evoy JP, Fasano A, Eaton WW. Prevalence of celiac disease and gluten sensitivity in the United States clinical antipsychotic trials of intervention effectiveness study population. Schizophr Bull. 2011 Jan;37(1):94-100. 21. Kalaydjian AE, Eaton W, Cascella N, Fasano A. The gluten connection: the association between schizophrenia and celiac disease. Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2006 Feb;113(2):82-90. 22. Wei J, Hemmings GP. Gene, gut and schizophrenia: the meeting point for the gene-environment interaction in developing schizophrenia. Med Hypotheses. 2005;64(3):547-52. 23. De Santis A, Addolorato G, Romito A, Caputo S, Giordano A, Gambassi G, Taranto C, Manna R, Gasbarrini G. Schizophrenic symptoms and SPECT abnormalities in a coeliac patient: regression after a gluten-free diet. J Intern Med. 1997 Nov;242(5):421-3. 24. Dickerson F, Stallings C, Origoni A, Vaughan C, Khushalani S, Yolken R. Markers of gluten sensitivity in acute mania: A longitudinal study. Psychiatry Res. 2012 Mar 2. 25. Millward C, Ferriter M, Calver S, Connell-Jones G. Gluten- and casein-free diets for autistic spectrum disorder. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2004;(2):CD003498. 26. Shattock P, Whiteley P. Biochemical aspects in autism spectrum disorders: updating the opioid-excess theory and presenting new opportunities for biomedical intervention. Expert Opin Ther Targets. 2002 Apr;6(2):175-83. 27. Knivsberg AM, Reichelt KL, Høien T, Nødland M. A randomised, controlled study of dietary intervention in autistic syndromes. Nutr Neurosci. 2002 Sep;5(4):251-61. 28. Fasano A, Not T, Wang W, Uzzau S, Berti I, Tommasini A, Goldblum SE. Zonulin, a newly discovered modulator of intestinal permeability, and its expression in coeliac disease. Lancet. 2000 Apr 29;355(9214):1518-9. 29. Clemente MG, De Virgiliis S, Kang JS, Macatagney R, Musu MP, Di Pierro MR, Drago S, Congia M, Fasano A. Early effects of gliadin on enterocyte intracellular signalling involved in intestinal barrier function. Gut. 2003 Feb;52(2):218-23. 30. http://www.latimes.com/health/boostershots/la-heb-gluten-sensitivity-20120221,0,4517592.story 31. http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-504763_162-57381966-10391704/gluten-free-diets-not-always-necessary-study-suggests/ 32. Knivsberg AM. Urine patterns, peptide levels and IgA/IgG antibodies to food proteins in children with dyslexia. Pediatr Rehabil. 1997 Jan-Mar;1(1):25-33. 33. http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/article444290.ece 34. http://www.thestar.com/living/article/1146787--gluten-free-diets-could-be-dangerous-doctors-say#article 35. Hoggan R. Considering wheat, rye, and barley proteins as aids to carcinogens. Med Hypotheses. 1997 Sep;49(3):285-8.
  20. Last November I was diagnosed with Celiac disease. Ever since I haven't been able to remain gluten-free for more than two weeks. I always make excuses and tell myself that I will start "tomorrow." Before being diagnosed, I thought I was gluten intolerant for over a year. I never visited a doctor or anything, I just had a horrible skin rash every time I ate gluten plus stomach pains and other symptoms so I made assumptions. The thing is, when I thought I was gluten intolerant I had no trouble being gluten-free because I thought it was only a temporary or superficial thing. Like it was ok to get sick every once in a while if the consequence was only a skin rash and symptoms for some hours or a day. I ate almost fully gluten-free for the past year, except for special occasions when I made the decision to indulge. As many of you all know, it is mentally very difficult to accept that you have to restrict yourself from foods you love forever. I am Mexican and food is a central part of our life and family traditions, making it even more difficult. To make matters worse, my family owns a bakery that is next to my house so the kitchen is constantly filled with gluten treats, cakes, cookies, everything. But when I thought I was gluten intolerant, I had absolutely no trouble restricting myself from all the foods that were around my house. I also developed other food sensitivities recently: corn, legumes, most nuts, soy, etc. I also feel discomfort when eating gluten-free processed foods, perhaps because I haven't complied with the gluten-free diet for a long time. I most definitely understand how destructive gluten can be for a celiac. I know that by eating gluten I am damaging my body and health. It is not physically difficult to abstain from gluten, I am having trouble adjusting mentally and socially. I have read all the scary posts about what can happen if I don't follow a gluten-free diet, so I am not posting this so I can be motivated by scare tactics. I am posting this because I am honestly desperate. I feel physically terrible after eating gluten, but it is not enough to make me stop. In my mind, I justify myself by thinking that I should eat X food one last time before actually starting my diet. It is mindblowing to me that even if I know what can happen to my body, I just keep binging on gluten. I believe that a huge reason for this is that I feel misunderstood. I have never met another celiac in my life, so I don't really have anyone that actually understands how difficult it can be to change your lifestyle permanently. The advice I constantly get from my friends is "just stop because it makes you sick," which is not very helpful. I really think that I need to talk with actual people that are also going through this or that have successfully transitioned to a gluten-free lifestyle postdiagnosis. I figured this forum was a good place to start, but I am new here and don't really know the "social etiquette" around here. I would love to connect with other celiacs and hear about how you managed to go gluten-free. What resources where helpful? Do you have any helpful tips? Thanks for reading!
  21. Hello, i have just joined the forum and i have decided to start a gluten free diet. I have both psoriasis and type 2 diabetes, both diseases that fare well gluten free. I will see my doctor on the 27th and ask for his assistance. In the meantime i just google away hoping to find good information i can apply to my life. If you have any information you would recommend a "newbie" look at online or in book form i would appreciate any help that you could give. With everything else that i am dealing with, starting a gluten free diet does not look too easy for me. That said, i am tired of "not feeling well" so much, especially right after i eat, so making a good diet change does seem to be in order.
  22. Celiac.com 11/23/2017 - Many theories have been fielded about autism. Some research careers have been made by investigating autism, while other careers have been seriously damaged when that research threatened some sacred cows of allopathic medicine. Yet despite all of this active research exploring the world of autism, we continue to experience exponential increases in rates at which autism is diagnosed. And debate continues unabated regarding the causes and appropriate treatments. Part of this increasing trend is, doubtless, because we have gotten better at recognizing the various manifestations of this debilitating condition. However, the evidence indicates that there is a dramatic increase in the absolute incidence of autism. Although frightening, this trend may offer some insight into several of the factors that contribute to this condition. That is the crux of my argument here. Since most prior theories have been tested in isolation, as is the norm in medical investigations, measurement of changes induced by individual contributing factors may either be so mild as to escape notice, or may not have been sufficient to induce symptom mitigation. Similarly, if preconceived notions shape resistance to some of these hypotheses, we may miss the most salient characteristics of autism. I have therefore chosen to combine several findings to form a testable hypothesis. I'll let posterity and the reader be the judges of whether this speculation is worthy of further investigation. We begin with Dr. Kalle Reichelt, who sought to understand autism and other psychiatric illnesses through the prism suggested by Dr. Curtis Dohan's work investigating schizophrenic patients. While Dohan et al reported positive results among schizophrenics from a gluten free, dairy free diet, Reichelt and his colleagues identified unique peptides in the urinary excretions from patients on the autistic spectrum and explored their possible connections with gluten and dairy proteins(1). A leaky gut appeared to be a precondition for autism. In 1996, D'Eufemia and others reported increased intestinal permeability in almost half of their autistic patients, using synthetic sugars that can be measured in the urine (2). Gardner has reported disturbed gastrointestinal function in autism. Reichelt and Knivsberg have also published reports of improved social interaction and communication among some children with autism following institution of a gluten-free, casein-free diet (4). However, their investigations reveal that the diet must be consistent, strict, and long-lasting to allow the gradual dissipation of the psychoactive peptides from these foods. Others have reported that this dissipation process can take up to 12 months (5). It is important to note that, while the work indicating that the symptoms of autism can often be mitigated by the strict, long-term avoidance of gluten and dairy, none of these investigators claimed that this diet can cure autism or even eliminates all of its symptoms. The diet simply helped children improve to the point where they could function better in school and society by mitigating their most severe and limiting symptoms (4). Many of these researchers postulate that improved integrity of the intestinal barrier and reduced ingestion of psychoactive peptides in the diet are a likely root of these improvements. Against this backdrop of widespread recognition of gastrointestinal dysfunction, excessive intestinal permeability, and symptom mitigation through dietary restriction in many autistic children, Dr. Andrew Wakefield, along with 12 other researchers, published their discovery of a pattern of intestinal inflammation and compromised barrier function in 11 of 12 subjects with pervasive developmental disorders, including 9 children with autism. Based on histories provided by parents, health visitors, and general practitioners, a pattern of behavioral/autistic symptom onset was seen within 14 days of combined vaccination for measles, mumps, and rubella. The average time to symptom onset was about 6 days. In the same report, Wakefield et al state "We did not prove an association between measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine and the syndrome described." Later on the same page, they state "If there is a causal link between measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine and this syndrome, a rising incidence might be anticipated after the introduction of this vaccine in the UK, in 1988." [my emphasis] Wakefield et al identify several reports connecting vaccine-strain measles virus with Crohn's disease and autoimmune hepatitis. They also hearken to earlier work that implicates inflamed or dysfunctional intestines in the behavior changes seen in some children. They point to other factors that suggest a genetic predisposition may also be a precondition of developing autism, along with markers of vitamin B12 deficiency (which many readers will recognize as a common finding in celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity). Clearly this group was not attacking the MMR vaccine or its importance to public health. Nonetheless, in the same issue of The Lancet, no less than six letters, written by a combined total of 21 authors, attacked Wakefield et al because of the impact that their findings might have on public health. Over the ensuing months and years, Wakefield's methods were criticized and denigrated. One of the more emotional attacks alleged academic fraud on Wakefield's part (7). He has been vilified in the public and professional media as a brigand. Yet he and his research group were careful to avoid making any claims beyond having found a form of bowel disease (lymphoid hyperplasia) in 9 of their subjects, and non-specific colitis in 11 of their subjects, along with reporting the close temporal association of onset of behavioral symptoms and MMR vaccines as reported by parents, health visitors, and general practitioners. They would have been remiss had they failed to report this association. Further, there were 12 other researchers who put their names to this research. Surely we cannot suspect that all 13 of these professionals would risk their careers to perpetrate a fraud! Meanwhile, as these attacks were ginning up, a research group at the University of Maryland reported that, in genetically susceptible individuals, a protein they dubbed "zonulin" can, when gluten is ingested, induce changes to intestinal permeability (8, 9). Does the gluten free, dairy free diet reduce excessive intestinal permeability? We know it does in people with celiac disease (8), but what impact would or could it have on children with the lymphoid hyperplasia and/or non-specific colitis identified by Wakefield et al? And does reduced zonulin production due to restriction of these foods explain the benefit experienced by many children with autism? Perhaps these questions are also relevant to another area of autism research reflected by identification of specific strains of clostridium infection in autism, first postulated by Bolte (10). Dr. S. Finegold and his colleagues demonstrated that 8 of 10 children with late onset autism showed transient reductions of symptoms of autism in response to oral vancomycin which returned when vancomycin was withdrawn (11). This is an antibiotic that is usually used in cases of antibiotic-resistant infections. Because this group identified an unusually large number and variety of strains of clostridium in their autistic subjects, as compared with controls, and because many clostridium variants excrete neurotoxic substances, their use of vancomycin was given to target clostridium. However, elements of Finegold's work and Wakefield's work may be taken to suggest some overlap. For instance, could the added clostridium load in autistic children contribute to the intestinal inflammation and permeability seen in Wakefield's report? Or could the MMR vaccinations produce conditions that are more hospitable to antibiotic resistant, neurotoxic strains of clostridia? Or could symptoms induced by MMR lead to administration of antibiotics that provide favorable conditions in the gut for proliferation of clostridium? To further complicate this issue, Dr. Stephanie Seneff has identified vitamin D deficiency, and popular use of statin drugs, in combination with reduced dietary consumption of cholesterol and fats as possible factors in autism. She implicates these deficiencies as arising either in utero or in infancy and she specifically cites work demonstrating that cholesterol, fats, and vitamin D are important components of healthy immune function (14). Putting it all together The hypothesis embodied herein asserts that at some stage the autistic child has: some predisposition to autism; a multi-dimensionally compromised immune system; been exposed to multiple and uncommon strains of clostridium which lead to the colonization of the gut by these antibiotic-resistant bacteria; are suffering from some degree of vitamin D deficiency and are eating a diet that is deficient in fats and cholesterol. Further, as the child develops one or more of the symptoms or sequelae of clostridium colonization or other infection, antibiotics are administered to provide relief from these or other symptoms of infection, sometimes including chronic ear infections. Thus, the competing gut bacteria that might otherwise keep these strains of clostridia in check are wiped out, permitting broader proliferation of multiple strains of clostridia. Similarly, the MMR vaccine, which, by design, engages and taxes the immune system. In the immune system's weakened state resulting from vaccination and dietary opioids (13), increased numbers of unusual strains of clostridium, abnormal gut biome, cholesterol deficiency, vitamin D deficiency, and perhaps, other nutrient deficiencies, also reduces systemic surveillance for, and antibody combat with, the clostridia and/or remnants of MMR vaccine. The neurotoxic excreta from clostridia and MMR are released into the intestinal lumen and by zonulin's action to widen the junctions between epithelial cells, these toxins are thus given access to the bloodstream. By the same pathway, opioids, other psychoactive peptides from gluten and dairy, along with other undigested and partly digested proteins, which may be harmful, also reach the bloodstream. From there, they travel to the BBB where zonulin again opens gaps in this barrier and allows the clostridium-derived toxins, opioids, and other impurities access to the brain where they alter blood-flow patterns, damage neurological tissues, and perhaps do other damage that has not yet been recognized. Ultimately, this damage and dynamics lead to impeded social performance, intellectual performance, and sometimes, induce startlingly abnormal behaviors. Although this picture appears bleak, and much of it simply reflects the several dietary miscues of the last and our current century, there are corrective steps that can sometimes improve these children's lives. Vitamin D, vitamin B12, and other supplements can be administered to address deficiencies. Because of the associated gut problems, sub-lingual vitamins, and exposure to sunlight without sun screen may both be good starting points. A strict, long-term gluten free, dairy free diet should also be on the menu, even if the whole family has to follow it to ensure that the autistic child does not rebel due to feeling deprived. High levels of cholesterol, saturated and mono-unsaturated fats should also comprise a large part of the diet. One or more courses of vancomycin may also be worth trying. In isolation, the benefits of antibiotics alone will likely be short-lived, as reported by Finegold, but in combination with these other strategies, may extend the benefits of this drug. New developments in antibiotics research may lead to isolation of protective substances from hens' egg shells that may provide more appropriate antibiotic relief and therefore benefit these children even more (15). Most of the research, to date, has focused on one of these factors in isolation. However, if an immune system is compromised by any or all of cholesterol deficiency, vitamin D deficiency, vitamin B12 deficiency, dietary shortages of cholesterol and fats, lingering, chronic sequelae of MMR vaccination, opioids from gluten and/or dairy, and an unusual and wide variety of clostridia, then it seems unreasonable to expect to reverse this condition through implementing only one of the interventions suggested by the above. Each and all of these other components should be addressed when attempting to remediate autism. In the context of these dietary and lifestyle changes, appropriate antibiotics may lead to more permanent improvements for the autistic child. This would be the greatest gift that a physician, parent, or caretaker could give to these children. One may hope. References: Reichelt KL, Hole K, Hamberger A, Saelid G, Edminson PD, Braestrup CB, Lingjaerde O, Ledaal P, Orbeck H. Biologically active peptide-containing fractions in schizophrenia and childhood autism. Adv Biochem Psychopharmacol. 1981;28:627-43. D'Eufemia P, Celli M, Finocchiaro R, Pacifico L, Viozzi L, Zaccagnini M, Cardi E, Giardini O. Abnormal intestinal permeability in children with autism. Acta Paediatr. 1996 Sep;85(9):1076-9. Gardner MLG (1994) in Physiology of the gastrointestinal tract (Johnson LR : edit) Rave Press, NY pp 1795-1820 Knivsberg AM, Reichelt KL, Høien T, Nødland M. A randomised, controlled study of dietary intervention in autistic syndromes. Nutr Neurosci. 2002 Sep;5(4):251-61. Paul, K., Henker, J., Todt, A., Eysold, R. (1985) Zoeliaki- Kranken Kindern in Abhaengigkeit von der Ernaehrung Seitschrift der Klinische Medizin 40; 707-709. as reported in Reichelt K (1990). The Effect of Gluten-Free Diet on Urinary Peptide Excretion and Clinical State in Schizophrenia. Journal of Orthomolecular Medicine. 5(4): 223-239. Wakefield AJ, Murch SH, Anthony A, Linnell J, Casson DM, Malik M, Berelowitz M, Dhillon AP, Thomson MA, Harvey P, Valentine A, Davies SE, Walker-Smith JA. Ileal-lymphoid-nodular hyperplasia, non-specific colitis, and pervasive developmental disorder in children. Lancet. 2004 Mar 6;363(9411):750. Flaherty DK. The vaccine-autism connection: a public health crisis caused by unethical medical practices and fraudulent science. Ann Pharmacother. 2011 Oct;45(10):1302-4. Epub 2011 Sep 13. Fasano A, Not T, Wang W, Uzzau S, Berti I, Tommasini A, Goldblum SE. Zonulin, a newly discovered modulator of intestinal permeability, and its expression in coeliac disease. Lancet. 2000 Apr 29;355(9214):1518-9. Clemente MG, De Virgiliis S, Kang JS, Macatagney R, Musu MP, Di Pierro MR, Drago S, Congia M, Fasano A. Early effects of gliadin on enterocyte intracellular signalling involved in intestinal barrier function. Gut. 2003 Feb;52(2):218-23. Bolte ER. Autism and Clostridium tetani. Med Hypotheses. 1998 Aug;51(2):133-44. Finegold SM, Molitoris D, Song Y, Liu C, Vaisanen ML, Bolte E, McTeague M, Sandler R, Wexler H, Marlowe EM, Collins MD, Lawson PA, Summanen P, Baysallar M, Tomzynski TJ, Read E, Johnson E, Rolfe R, Nasir P, Shah H, Haake DA, Manning P, Kaul A. Gastrointestinal microflora studies in late-onset autism. Clin Infect Dis. 2002 Sep 1;35(Suppl 1):S6-S16. http://stephanie-on-health.blogspot.ca/2008/11/sunscreen-and-low-fat-diet-recipe-for.html Hoggan R. Considering wheat, rye, and barley proteins as aids to carcinogens. Med Hypotheses. 1997 Sep;49(3):285-8 Seneff S, Davidson R, Mascitelli L. Might cholesterol sulfate deficiency contribute to the development of autistic spectrum disorder? Med Hypotheses. 2012 Feb;78(2):213-7. Epub 2011 Nov 17. Wellman-Labadie O, Lakshminarayanan R, Hinckeemail MT Antimicrobial properties of avian eggshell-specific C-type lectin-like proteins. FEBS Letters Volume 582, Issue 5 , Pages 699-704, 5 March 2008
  23. Celiac.com 11/18/2017 - Just looking at its name, one might wonder if buckwheat is safe for people on a gluten-free diet. However, unlike its name, buckwheat does not naturally contain any wheat or gluten. As a result, buckwheat is considered safe for people with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet. Turns out that buckwheat and wheat are from different, unrelated botanical families. As with quinoa, buckwheat is the seed of a flowering plant, as such it is not considered a grain or a cereal. Buckwheat is actually closely related to rhubarb. It is an excellent source of fiber and nutrients. A serving of cooked buckwheat groats, the small triangular seeds, offers 17 grams of dietary fiber and 22 grams of protein. Buckwheat is not only nutritious, but it contains rutin, a compound shown to strengthen capillary walls and improve circulation. As such, buckwheat, is also regarded as beneficial for people with type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure. As with grains, buckwheat can become contaminated with wheat during processing, transportation or if it is grown in fields also used to grow wheat. To make sure your buckwheat is gluten-free, it is important to find certified gluten-free buckwheat. Also, remember that some products labled as buckwheat may include wheat flour, so double check to make sure your product is labled gluten-free. Otherwise, buckwheat is a healthy, nutritious gluten-free alternative for people with celiac disease.
  24. Celiac.com 10/23/2017 - What's the relationship between celiac disease and liver histology, serology and treatment response? Celiac disease is diagnosed on the basis of ESPGHAN criteria, and clinical response to gluten-free diet. Researchers have noted histological abnormalities on liver biopsies in patients with celiac disease, but have rarely described the abnormalities in detail. A team of researchers recently set out to assess the histological spectrum of 'celiac hepatitis' and to see if a gluten-free diet can reduce such features. The research team included K Majumdar, P Sakhuja, AS Puri, K Gaur, A Haider, and R Gondal. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Pathology, and the Department of Gastroenterology at the G B Pant Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, New Delhi, India. Their team analyzed twenty-five patients with concomitant celiac disease and hepatic derangement for clinical profile, laboratory investigations and duodenal and liver biopsy. They then made a histological comparison of pre- and post-GFD duodenal and liver biopsies, where possible. They found that fifteen patients with celiac disease later developed abnormal liver function tests. They also found that 7 out of 10 patients with liver disease showed tissue positive transglutaminase, while 6 of the 10 had antigliadin antibodies. Eight patients showed serological markers for autoimmune liver disease (AILD). Liver histology ranged from mild reactive hepatitis, chronic hepatitis, and steatosis to cirrhosis. They found six patients with liver biopsies made after a gluten-free diet. Five of these patients showed a decrease in steatosis, portal and lobular inflammation and fibrosis score. From these results, they concluded that celiac hepatitis could be a distinct condition, and that patients may present with either celiac disease, or with secondary hepatic derangement. They recommend celiac evaluations for patients with AILD, unexplained transaminasaemia or anemia. This is one of the few studies to show the range of histological changes to the liver in patients with 'celiac hepatitis'. They note that the adoption of a gluten-free diet in such patients may help to improve symptoms of 'celiac hepatitis'. Source: J Clin Pathol. 2017 Sep 29. pii: jclinpath-2017-204647. doi: 10.1136/jclinpath-2017-204647.
  25. Digestive Upset Causes Beyond Gluten When you have Celiac disease, you have a damaged digestive system. This requires that extra care should be taken to avoid foods and additives that are known to cause digestive side effects. Many of the people who successfully recover their health after going gluten free will speak about having to make other dietary changes. These additional changes generally involve removing other foods not thought of to have gluten. Some of these other foods do in fact contain gluten. Some of it will be in the various ingredients in packaged foods, or cross contamination during some point in the production line. But others will actually not contain gluten, but do contain other substances that further irritate the damaged digestive systems that those with Celiac Disease have. Some terms that are heard these days are: Leaky Gut Intestinal Permeability Microbiome Probiotics and Prebiotics These all relate to managing the digestive system. It can get a bit overwhelming when you start digging into these subjects, since there appears to be an endless amount of info to learn. Many of them don't directly speak about Celiac and gluten. Others will disregard gluten problems, and be disrespectful of Celiac sufferers. However, the core theories, and core research backed information coming out of these topics carry an extremely important message: Put good stuff into your diet, and take damaging stuff out. Groundbreaking Advances in Digestive Health Importance Research in the last few years is really starting to get the core understanding of how this works, and realizing it's much more important than anyone dreamed of. This research is really just the beginning. The research will continue, and much more will be learned over the coming years. Some core concepts that have come out so far are: The main part of the immune system resides in the stomach. The microbiome is the core of the immune system. The microbiome is the bacteria in our systems, with "ground zero" being the stomach and digestive tract. Modern life as lived for the last 100 to 150 years has seriously changed the composition of the microbiome, and not for the better. The microbiome can be "changed" via diet. (The details of this are still in their infancy, so much more will be learned in the coming years.) Every person has a unique microbiome, thus meaning solutions will be unique to every single person. (This is why some treatments, diets, etc. have such dramatically different results from person to person.) As people with Celiac disease, who still struggle with not feeling well, we can use this to tailor a truly unique diet plan for our life, and for our wellness. We all must start with removing gluten, ALL gluten, from our diets. Unfortunately, that does mean some dramatic lifestyle changes. If we all lived in Utopia, we could just snap our fingers and have a proper gluten free product available for everything we're used to eating. But we don't live in Utopia. We live in a culture that is obsessed with gluten. It's everywhere. As many of you are aware, first hand, eating gluten free is being treated like a fad. That means that your need for 100% gluten free foods are being disregarded, and not truly taken seriously. By restaurants, food manufacturers, your friends, your family, etc. Far too many people think "just a little is okay." If you REALLY want to get well, then you need to control your food 100%. That can be inconvenient. It involves a big learning curve. However, it's vital to understand that with practice, this truly will become second nature. But only if you take the initiative to educate yourself fully. If you rely on someone else to make some or all of these decisions, you will not get better. You will continue to be sick, and you will continue to suffer. As you learn about taking control of eating gluten free, you'll run across a lot of conflicting info. You'll just have to work through the conflicting info, to find what's actually true. A Core Step in Recovery A big first step in getting control is to eat only food. That may sound silly, but there's a ton of stuff in the products that we buy that isn't really food, and the vast majority of them can irritate various parts of our bodies. Manufacturers use a lot of additives to mimic the taste, texture and actions of more expensive food ingredients, and to allow them to sell items that if made with real foods would not be able to be packaged and sold long after they were made. If you're still struggling with feeling well, and feeling frustrated that you can't eat "normal" then it may be time to get back to basics for a while, until you can learn more. It really is better to feel well and have what you may think of as a restricted diet. When you feel well, you can make better decisions, plan more, get a bit more creative in your meal planning, etc. Change Our Attitudes, Change Our Destiny A change in our attitude about food will also go a long way to help us deal with the needed changes. For example, we may think we're being deprived by not being able to eat "normal." However, if you think the "Standard American Diet" (the SAD diet) is "normal," then it may be time to rethink the wisdom of that. The SAD diet has come to be known as one of the worst ways to eat that the world has seen. It causes severe chronic illness, and is massively contributing to decades of illness for many Americans. Earlier I said that our culture is obsessed with gluten. This is clearly seen when you look at the last several Food Guides that the USDA has put out. The current version recommends 5 to 8 servings per day of grain products (for adult women and men). That's a LOT of grain. That's a LOT of bread. We're being told that we must eat grains to provide the following (per current USDA MyPlate site): fiber some B vitamins - folate / folic acid; thiamin, roboflavin, niacin iron magnesium selenium When we cut out gluten containing grains, we pretty much cut out getting these above nutrients from grains. It's almost impossible to get these nutrients in the same quantities from non gluten grains. However, all is not lost. It's very easy to get these nutrients in other common foods in our diet (if we don't follow the USDA MyPlate recommendations). You can get a ton of fiber from adding leafy greens, vegetables, some fruits, nuts, and seeds. All of the B vitamins in the processed grains, those mostly used in the US and other developed countries, are added. The fact is that the processing of foods strips out most of the natural B vitamins. It's super easy to get these vitamins from meat, dairy, nuts, seeds, beans and vegetables. Be sure to eat all of those foods. If you have some other reason to exclude some of those foods, then get some proper advice from someone who properly understands eating gluten free AND your other limitations. Remember that part of the reason we think we must have these very high levels of grains is that's what the marketers have told us. Even the USDA is really just a group of growers in the US that grow mostly grains (along with a large portion raising livestock). The USDA's food guides have been shown repeatedly to NOT be based on truthful, valid research. Take a Step Back, Keep it Simple to Start So, when you're planning your gluten free diet, remember that you don't have to fill your plate with as many grains as you may be used to. Get back to the basics. Plan out some home cooked meals, made with pure, fresh foods. This may be something you haven't done much of, since our culture is so used to buying mostly prepared foods, but with some practice, and some basic planning, you'll be well on your way to making significant progress in getting well. Here's a super simple dinner plan, to get you started, when you have no idea how to start: Choose your favorite PROTEIN - meat, beans. Pick your favorite single herbs to prepare them with. Add some diced onions or garlic. Cook. Choose 2 different colored VEGGIES, steam them, or cut up and eat raw - have one be green, the other one be a nice vibrant color. Choose a STARCH - brown rice, potatoes, yams, etc. Boil and serve with butter. Make a SALAD, with a base of leaf lettuce, and at least 4 other veggies, all different colors. Make a salad dressing from scratch: 1 crushed garlic clove, 1/4 c apple cider vinegar, 1/2 c olive oil, 1 tsp raw honey, 1/4 tsp salt, 1/8 tsp pepper. Place in a container and shake. You can take this basic plan, and adjust one thing at a time by finding a recipe you like that fits the gluten free, processed food free criteria. Over time, you'll start to build a wonderful collection of recipes that suit you and your family. Be sure to let us all know in the comments below when you try this, how it went, and be sure to tell us what you ate! Bon Appetit! Thora Toft - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - References and further research: Time to Run - Recommended dietary allowance (RDA) USDA - Choose MyPlate website Excerpt from “Sugar Crush: How to Reduce Inflammation, Reverse Nerve Damage and Reclaim Good Health” by Richard Jacoby and Raquel Baldelomar
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