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Found 7 results

  1. Celiac.com 01/26/2019 - Introduction: Gluten is a protein found in wheat and other grains such as rye and barley and is composed of glutenin and gliadin. The gliadin portion of this complex protein is the leading cause of gluten sensitivity and immunological response of the body. Millions of Americans are affected by the presence of gluten in their diet. Foods containing gluten are numerous: bread, pasta, muffins, beer, and many more. FDA regulation stipulates that the food must contain less than 20 ppm to be labeled Gluten-free. ZyGluten is a blend of potent digestive enzymes including Protease, Amylase, Lipase and others along with Lactococci . Two capsules (750mg) of ZyGluten was added to a bread and pasta emulsion. Time points were taken within a 60 minute time frame. Our objective was to study a dietary supplement, Zygluten, in a stomach simulator and assess hydrolysis of gluten concentration to below 20 ppm within 60 minutes. The development work was done in vitro in a Gastric simulator at 37◦C at a pH of 2 and 4. Method Foods tested: Whole Wheat Bread and Pasta Gluten concentration in food and drink can be analyzed through the preferred AOAC method: RIDASCREEN Gliadin competitive by R-BioPharm. This is an enzyme immunoassay that measures peptide fragments of prolamins and recognizes the potentially toxic QQPFP sequence found in wheat, rye and barley. Foods or beverages containing more than 20 ppm (parts per million) gluten will elicit an immunological reaction in a person sensitive to gluten. Therefore, according to FDA and EC regulations, “gluten free” foods must not contain more than 20ppm gluten. RIDASCREEN Gliadin competitive kit detects gliadin of gluten to below 5ppm. Extraction of Gliadin from Bread Used four slices of whole wheat bread per 1 L MilliQ water and blended the mixture in a Vitamix until completely homogenized. The pH was adjusted to 4.0 with concentrated HCL Aliquoted 500ml of emulsion mixture into flasks. Added 1 capsule of Zygluten to experimental flasks. No Zygluten was added into control flasks. 250 µ L samples were taken at time zero (T0) from each flask and placed into 2.5mL of cocktail solution in a 15mL confocal tube. Placed flasks in 37◦C incubator for 60 minutes with slight shaking. 250 µ L samples were taken at 30 minutes and 60 minutes, which were then added to 2.5ml of cocktail solution. Samples in cocktail solution were incubated for 45 minutes in 50◦C water bath. Tubes were removed from water bath and cooled to room temperature. 7.5 ml of freshly made 80% Ethanol was added to tubes and vigorously shaken for one hour. Then the tubes were centrifuged for 10 minutes to remove all particulates from solution. Supernatant was then used in the RIDASCREEN Gliadin test Analysis of Gliadin (Method followed per RIDASCREEEN Gliadin protocol) Analysis was done following RIDASCREEN Gliadin Kit protocol Control samples were diluted by mixing 80µL sample with 920µL sample diluents twice to bring into linear range needed for testing. Experimental samples were diluted by mixing 80µL sample with 920µL sample diluent to bring into linear range needed for testing. Remainder of protocol was followed per RIDASCREEN Gliadin Kit (R8001) sections titled Test Implementation and Results. Pasta was cooked as instructed on labels. Amount of pasta tested in the experiment was the portion size stated on the label. The whole wheat bread was tested at four slices of bread per one liter of water. The foods were mixed with water using a blender and its pH was adjusted to 4 before transferring it to flasks for testing. Two capsules equaling a total of 750mg of ZyGluten were added to all experimental samples. No enzyme or additional material was added to control. Both, experimental flasks and controls were incubated at 37◦C at 100 RPM shaking for 60 minutes. Time points were taken at 0 minutes, 2 minutes, 30 minutes and 60 minutes when appropriate. Gluten was then extracted from samples and analyzed by an AOAC certified test with Immunoessay . Results 96% of gluten in wheat bread was hydrolyzed within the first few seconds of the addition of Zygluten. The amount of wheat bread tested was double the recommended serving size. At 30 minutes the amount of gluten was below 20 ppm and at 60 minutes the concentration of gluten was 4 ppm. The hydrolysis of gluten in pasta was more rapid. In that more than 98% of gluten was broken down with the addition of ZyGluten. At time point 0 the gluten concentration was 14 ppm and then decreased to about 2-4 ppm by 60 minutes. Study co-authors: Nora Lopez-Chiaffarelli, Isabel Gray-Horna PhD, Ramesh Chandran PhD, Rakesh Saini PhD.
  2. Celiac.com 01/18/2019 - I recently had the opportunity to try a high-protein dietary supplement made by Life's Abundance. It's called Life's Abundance Plant Protein Dietary Supplement, and it comes in vanilla or chocolate flavors. The supplement makes it very easy to add extra protein and fiber to your diet. There are several ways to use this plan protein supplement, and besides just mixing one scoop of it into 8 ounces of cold water to make a shake, it can also be added to smoothies, pancakes, baked goods and oatmeal. I tested it out by making shakes. As advertised, this supplement is packed with protein, at 14 grams per serving, and each serving also contains 3 grams of fiber. The main ingredients are pea protein, hemp protein, pumpkin protein, quinoa, chia seeds, coconut oil, and oat fiber. It was especially nice to see such a small, wholesome ingredient list, as many similar products contain far too many ingredients, and both are also soy-free and non-GMO. Making a protein shake couldn't be easier—I added one scoop of plant protein powder to 8 ounces of cold water and stirred thoroughly, and it was ready to drink. The texture and taste of both shakes were very good, and the vanilla flavor reminded me of vanilla ice cream. The chocolate flavor was similar to a not-too-sweet hot cocoa, and it had a slight dark chocolate taste. Clearly this product is perfect for a hearty snack, as I felt full after a single shake, but I also felt full of energy! Each serving contains only 100 calories. The shakes were also easy to digest, unlike others I've tried. Overall I think that anyone who wants to increase their dietary protein and fiber intake, and stick to a healthy regimen in the process, would really like Life's Abundance Plant Protein Dietary Supplements. Visit their site for more info.
  3. Celiac.com Sponsor: Banner

    GliadinX Breaks Down Gluten in the Gut

    GliadinX is a dietary supplement with the highest concentration of AN-PEP, Prolyl Endopeptidase (Aspergillus Niger), the most effective enzyme proven to break down gluten in the stomach. This high potency enzyme formulation is specifically designed to break down gliadin, and unlike other enzyme formulas that claim to do the same, there is a growing body of research that backs up the effectiveness of GliadinX (see Sources below). GliadinX does not prevent and is not a cure for celiac disease, however, extensive scientific research has been conducted at multiple medical centers which has shown that it effectively breaks down gliadin into small, harmless fragments before it can reach the small intestine. GliadinX is perfect for celiacs who still want to eat outside of their home, and not have to worry about cross-contamination, and for those who are gluten sensitive and wish to continue eating gluten. For more info visit their site. Sources: Extra-Intestinal Manifestation of Celiac Disease in Children. Nutrients 2018, 10(6), 755; doi:10.3390/nu10060755 Efficient degradation of gluten by a prolyl endoprotease in a gastrointestinal model Enzymatic gluten detoxification: the proof of the pudding is in the eating! Highly efficient gluten degradation with a newly identified prolyl endoprotease: implications for celiac disease Degradation of gluten in wheat bran and bread drink by means of a proline-specific peptidase
  4. GliadinX is a dietary supplement with the highest concentration of AN-PEP, Prolyl Endopeptidase (Aspergillus Niger), the most effective enzyme proven to break down gluten in the stomach. This high potency enzyme formulation is specifically designed to break down gliadin, and unlike other enzyme formulas that claim to do the same, there is a growing body of research that backs up the effectiveness of GliadinX (see Sources below). GliadinX does not prevent and is not a cure for celiac disease, however, extensive scientific research has been conducted at multiple medical centers which has shown that it effectively breaks down gliadin into small, harmless fragments before it can reach the small intestine. GliadinX is perfect for celiacs who still want to eat outside of their home, and not have to worry about cross-contamination, and for those who are gluten sensitive and wish to continue eating gluten. The quote below was made by Dr. Stefano Guandalini, Department of Pediatrics, Section of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center-Comer Children’s Hospital, Chicago, IL, and was published in Nutrients 2018, 10(6), 755: "12. Treatment of the Extra-Intestinal Manifestations of CD the only one that is currently on the market is the gluten-specific enzyme, GliadinX (AN-PEP). Unfortunately, it is only capable of detoxifying 0.2 g of gluten or roughly that of 1/8 of a slice of gluten-containing bread. For this reason, it should only be used as an adjunct to the GFD when there are concerns for accidental gluten contamination and in an effort to ameliorate symptoms, not as a replacement for the GFD." Many people have asked Celiac.com how they can order this product, so we've included a "Buy Now" link below to order them directly from the manufacturer: Sources: Scientific publications on AN-PEP enzymes: Extra-Intestinal Manifestation of Celiac Disease in Children. Nutrients 2018, 10(6), 755; doi:10.3390/nu10060755 Efficient degradation of gluten by a prolyl endoprotease in a gastrointestinal model Enzymatic gluten detoxification: the proof of the pudding is in the eating! Highly efficient gluten degradation with a newly identified prolyl endoprotease: implications for celiac disease Degradation of gluten in wheat bran and bread drink by means of a proline-specific peptidase
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