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Found 18 results

  1. Celiac.com 05/02/2017 - Do women who use dietary supplements during pregnancy face higher rates of celiac disease in their offspring? To answer this question a team examined the maternal use of vitamin D, n-3 fatty acids (FA) and Fe supplements during pregnancy and looked for any corresponding risk for celiac disease autoimmunity, or celiac disease, in their children. The study, known as The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young, or "TEDDY," prospectively followed from birth children with increased genetic risk. The team defines celiac disease autoimmunity as the presence of persistently positive tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (tTGA). The TEDDY research team includes Jimin Yang, Roy N. Tamura, Carin A. Aronsson, Ulla M. Uusitalo, Åke Lernmark, Marian Rewers, William A. Hagopian, Jin-Xiong She, Jorma Toppari, Anette G. Ziegler, Beena Akolkar, Jeffrey P. Krischer, Jill M. Norris, Suvi M. Virtanen, and Daniel Agardh. For their study, the team enrolled 6,627 children with confirmed celiac disease. They confirmed celiac diagnosis either with biopsy results, and also included those with likely celiac, if they had persistently elevated levels of tTGA>100 AU. Of the 6,627 children originally enrolled, 1,136 developed celiac disease autoimmunity at a median 3·1 years of age (range 0·9–10) and 409 developed celiac disease at a median 3·9 years of age (range 1·2–11). The data showed that 66% of mothers used supplements containing vitamin D, 17% containing n-3 FA, and 94% containing iron, at 3–4 months postpartum. Over the entire pregnancy, mothers consumed an average total intake of 2,014 μg vitamin D (sd 2045 μg), 111 g n-3 FA (sd 303 g) and 8,806 mg Fe (sd 7,017 mg). After adjusting for country of residence, child's human leucocyte antigen genotype, sex, family history of celiac disease, any breast-feeding duration and household crowding, Cox's proportional hazard ratios showed no statistically significant association between the intake of vitamin D, n-3 FA or Fe, and risk for celiac disease autoimmunity or celiac disease. The use of dietary supplements during pregnancy may improve nutrition, but it is not likely to have any effect upon the risk for celiac disease in the offspring. Source: Cambridge.org The researchers in this study are variously associated with the Health Informatics Institute, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, The Diabetes and Celiac Disease Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, 20502 Malmö, Sweden, Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, Pacific Northwest Diabetes Research Institute, Seattle, WA 98122, USA, the Center for Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine, Augusta University, Augusta, GA, the Department of Physiology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Turku, Finland, the Department of Pediatrics, Turku University Hospital, 20520 Turku, Finland, the Institute of Diabetes Research, Helmholtz Zentrum München and Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, and Forschergruppe Diabetes e.V., 80804 Neuherberg, Germany, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MA, the Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, the Unit of Nutrition, National Institute for Health and Welfare, 00300 Helsinki, Finland, the Health Sciences Center, Center for Child Health Research, University of Tampere, Tampere University Hospital, 33521 Tampere, Finland, and the The Science Center, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, 33521 Tampere, Finland.
  2. Celiac.com 01/26/2017 - The only currently effective therapy for celiac disease is for patients to follow a gluten-free diet. However, no serum marker for gluten intake has yet been found, so it's not always easy for doctors to tell if patients are following their diets properly. A team of researchers recently set out to evaluate the use of alkylresorcinol concentrations for detecting dietary gluten intake in humans and mice. The research team included R. S. Choung, J. A. Murray, E. V. Marietta, C. T. Van Dyke, and A. B. Ross. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA, and with the Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden. For their study, they compared alkylresorcinol concentrations among 34 treated patients with celiac disease, 36 untreated celiac disease patients and 33 control subjects. They also evaluated seven additional celiac disease patients whose serum samples were available at diagnosis and after gluten-free diet. In mice, they compared alkylresorcinol concentrations in the serum of five mice fed a regular chow, and 10 mice fed lifelong with a gluten-free chow. In addition, They also assessed the effect of added gluten on alkylresorcinol concentrations. Their study indicates that serum alkylresorcinol concentrations could be a useful marker for dietary gluten in celiac disease. Certainly, having an easy, reliable way for doctors to spot dietary gluten will be useful in helping people with celiac disease maintain their required gluten-free diets. Source: Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics. DOI: 10.1111/apt.13917
  3. Celiac.com 07/05/2016 - Principal Investigator: Amrit P.S. Narula M.D, F.A.C.P, F.A.C.G, F.A.C.N., A.G.A.F Study Coordinator: Alicia Mercuri, PA-C Background Research estimates that approximately 18 million Americans have gluten sensitivity. That is six times more than patients confirmed with celiac disease. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity is defined as those individuals who cannot tolerate gluten in the diet and experience the same symptoms attributed to celiac disease, but lack antibodies and intestinal damage as seen in celiac disease. A dietary supplement called ZyGluten was developed from in vitro studies, not in vivo. The primary aim in its development was a supplement which, if taken at the beginning of a meal, would hydrolyze gluten concentration in ingested food. Foods tested included McDonald's hamburger, white sliced bread, a plain bagel, macaroni and cheese, spaghetti, a muffin, and frozen pizza. The amount of gluten was measured at 0, 30 and 60 minutes after the introduction of ZyGluten. In all samples, gluten measured at the end of 60 minutes was less than 20 ppm. ZyGluten is a compound of amylases, proteases, and lipase enzymes with probiotics, specifically Lactococcus lactis and Lactococcus cremoris. It is derived from plant and microbial sources. Inclusion Criteria Ages 18-80 years Physician diagnosed gluten sensitivity by history and experienced symptoms of gluten sensitivity for at least 1 month prior to involvement Willing to take supplement twice daily for 2 weeks Sign informed consent Exclusion criteria Active Inflammatory Disease Celiac disease confirmed by antibodies and duodenal biopsy Peptic ulcer disease Lactose intolerance Pregnant or lactating women Received any experimental drug within 30 days of enrollment Methods 27 patients, all of whom met the inclusion criteria, were selected to take 2 capsules of ZyGlutens before 2 major meals of the day for 2 weeks. 23 patients were female and 4 were male, with ages ranging from 25-77. The following symptoms were assessed at baseline, week 1, and week 2 which was the conclusion of the study: Abdominal pain Diarrhea Constipation Headaches Joint pain Fatigue The severity of symptoms was measured as mild, moderate, or severe, and none if symptoms were absent. All patients were contacted by phone within 48 hours of start of the trial to assess for any adverse effects. Following parameters were checked at baseline, week 1, and week 2: Weight Height Blood pressure Pulse rate Respiration rate Patients were not charged or reimbursed for their participation in the study. Results The following number of patients (27) had these symptoms at baseline: None Mild Moderate Severe Abdominal Pain/Cramping 1 1 16 9 Bloating/Distention 0 3 9 15 Diarrhea 10 4 2 11 Constipation 16 2 3 6 Headaches 11 5 7 4 Joint Pains 12 2 9 4 Fatigue 3 4 5 15 The following number of patients (23) had these symptoms at week 1: None Mild Moderate Severe Abdominal pain/Cramping 10 7 4 2 Bloating/Distention 9 10 1 3 Diarrhea 16 5 2 0 Constipation 20 1 1 1 Headaches 17 2 3 1 Joint Pains 14 2 4 3 Fatigue 7 8 3 5 The following number of patients (23) had these symptoms at week 2: None Mild Moderate Severe Abdominal Pain/Cramping 15 4 2 2 Bloating/Distention 14 6 1 2 Diarrhea 21 1 1 0 Constipation 21 1 0 1 Headaches 16 5 1 1 Joint Pains 17 3 2 1 Fatigue 10 7 1 5 The following number of patients rated their symptom improvement as: No improvement: 0 Improved: 4 Markedly improved: 19 Adverse Effects No patients reported any adverse effects. Participants Twenty-seven participants were enrolled in the study. Two patients withdrew from the study; one of which had a scheduling conflict with follow-up visits and one stopped taking the medication due to increased sleepiness after two pills. Two patients were lost to follow-up. These four patients were excluded from analysis. Conclusion In conclusion, ZyGluten study is a 2 week open labeled trial. Our outcome so far has shown to be extremely efficacious with no significant side effects. There was no significant difference found in patients who complained of headaches or joint pain. The majority of the patients found significant improvement in their symptoms of abdominal pain, bloating, changes in bowel habits, and fatigue. In fact, 83% of patients rated that their symptoms markedly improved, and 17% rated an improvement in their symptoms. Patient Testimonials *The medication was known by patients as ‘Gluten Buster' during the clinical trial. "Medication has given me more freedom. I am no longer afraid to eat, especially away from home. I am very pleased with the medication".-MF "My symptoms have improved. I would like to keep taking this if I can, especially since it's natural, to see how long I can go without an endoscopy".-MH "I feel that this pill has made a tremendous improvement in my condition". –BW "Bloating is gone. Stools seem to be more formed. Feeling good". –PS "It's wonderful to not be limited in what I can eat. It's great not to have the symptoms of pain, etc. when eating gluten foods". –JH "Great for bloating".-JF "Very little of passing gas. I feel good". -PW "Bloating is a lot better". -LW "I have not had any cramping or urgency to have a BM after a meal. My bowel movements are now normal. I have had no GI distress since on the meds". –KY "Gluten Buster has been a miracle pill. After so many years of having bowel problems, I never knew what it was like to have a regular bowel movement. I have had no problems with digestive system since I starting taking these pills". -JM "Medication was very helpful". –KO "My experience with the Gluten Buster that Dr. Narula has given me to take has been simply amazing. It has made my quality of life so much better. He is an amazing doctor to help those that otherwise thought there was no hope! I feel great"!-CM "Seems a little bit better. Still have IBS. Still have a lot of gas and bloating."-AM "It has been helping to go to the bathroom. The weight is going up and the stomach is going down a little bit".-SH "Before taking the medicine, mornings were hard because of bloating and diarrhea. Now I feel great in the morning".-GK "Gluten Buster is a life changer. Will definitely go on it when available in market." -MC "It is helping with bloating and gas. Has improved all of my GI symptoms. Overall, I can eat anything, including French fries and food I could not eat before (Super Pill)". -MK "I feel it has improved. Still have bloating, but eating regular food. Diarrhea has improved, no pain in stomach or abdomen". -BS "I feel 10x better than I did before starting the medication. No stomach cramps of bloating, I only have a BM twice/day. Feel great!" -JB "I am doing 100% better now since I have been taking the Gluten Buster meds". - JZ "Passing more gas, feeling better". -ML "I'm feeling better. I'm eating anything I want, not sticking with gluten free food. If it's due to taking the Gluten Buster, then I would still take it". -BS "It has made a big difference in bloating and abdominal pain. I would like to continue taking it". -JP "My stomach feels fantastic when I take the product. This should be available for all people with gluten sensitivity. This would be a great idea for Shark Tank. It needs to be available to the masses! I don't know how my stomach will survive without it, especially at the holidays". -LT References Am J Gastroenterol. 2011 Mar;106(3):508-14; quiz 515. doi: 10.1038/ajg.2010.487. Epub 2011 Jan 11. Gluten causes gastrointestinal symptoms in subjects without celiac disease: a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial. Biesiekierski JR1, Newnham ED, Irving PM, Barrett JS, Haines M, Doecke JD, Shepherd SJ, Muir JG, Gibson PR. The Oslo definitions for celiac disease and related terms. Jonas F Ludvigsson,1,2 Daniel A Leffler,3 Julio C Bai,4 Federico Biagi,5 Alessio Fasano,6 Peter H R Green,7 Marios Hadjivassiliou,8 Katri Kaukinen,9 Ciaran P Kelly,3 Jonathan N Leonard,10 Knut Erik Aslaksen Lundin,11 Joseph A Murray,12 David S Sanders,13,14 Marjorie M Walker,14 Fabiana Zingone,15 Carolina Ciacci16 Food Allergy - An Overview (PDF|1 MB). DHHS. NIH. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2014 Jun-Jul;37(6):362-71. doi: 10.1016/j.gastrohep.2014.01.005. Epub 2014 Mar 22. [Non-celiac gluten sensitivity: a critical review of current evidence]. [Article in Spanish] Molina-Infante J1, Santolaria S2, Montoro M2, Esteve M3, Fernández-Bañares F3. Gluten Causes Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Subjects Without Celiac Disease: A Double-Blind Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial. Jessica R Biesiekierski, Evan D Newnham, Peter M Irving, Jacqueline S Barrett, Melissa Haines, James D Doecke, Susan J Shepherd, Jane G Muir and Peter R Gibson. Nutrients. 2013 Sep 26;5(10):3839-53. doi: 10.3390/nu5103839. Non-Celiac Gluten sensitivity: the new frontier of gluten related disorders. Catassi C1, Bai JC, Bonaz B, Bouma G, Calabrò A, Carroccio A, Castillejo G, Ciacci C, Cristofori F, Dolinsek J, Francavilla R, Elli L, Green P, Holtmeier W, Koehler P, Koletzko S, Meinhold C, Sanders D, Schumann M, Schuppan D, Ullrich R, Vécsei A, Volta U, Zevallos V, Sapone A, Fasano A. BMC Med. 2014 May 23;12:86. doi: 10.1186/1741-7015-12-86. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity - why worry? Lundin KE. BMC Med. 2014 May 23;12:85. doi: 10.1186/1741-7015-12-85. An Italian prospective multicenter survey on patients suspected of having non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Volta U1, Bardella MT, Calabrò Neurogastroenterol Motil. 2013 Nov;25(11):864-71. doi: 10.1111/nmo.12216. Epub 2013 Aug 12. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity: clinical relevance and recommendations for future research. Mooney PD1, Aziz I, Sanders DS. World J Gastroenterol. 2014 Jul 21;20(27):8837-45. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v20.i27.8837. Irritable bowel syndrome and food interaction. Cuomo R, Andreozzi P, Zito FP, Passananti V, De Carlo G, Sarnelli G. Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2012;6(1):43-55. Problems of an Emerging Condition Separate From Celiac Disease. Amy C Brown Dig Dis Sci. 1999 Jul;44(7):1317-21. Pancreatic supplements reduce symptomatic response of healthy subjects to a high fat meal. Suarez F1, Levitt MD, Adshead J, Barkin JS.
  4. Celiac.com 09/23/2013 - Patients with non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) do not have celiac disease, but see an improvement in symptoms when they adopt gluten-free diets. A team of researchers recently investigated the specific effects of gluten after dietary reduction of fermentable, poorly absorbed, short-chain carbohydrates (fermentable, oligo-, di-, monosaccharides, and polyols [FODMAPs]) in patients with suspected NCGS. The research team included Jessica R. Biesiekierski, Simone L. Peters, Evan D. Newnham, Ourania Rosella, Jane G. Muir, and Peter R. Gibson. The team performed a double-blind cross-over trial of 37 subjects (aged 24−61 y, 6 men) with NCGS and irritable bowel syndrome (based on Rome III criteria), but not celiac disease. They assigned study participants randomly to groups given a 2-week diet of reduced FODMAPs, and were then placed on high-gluten (16 g gluten/d), low-gluten (2 g gluten/d and 14 g whey protein/d), or control (16 g whey protein/d) diets for 1 week, followed by a washout period of at least 2 weeks. The researchers then evaluated serum and fecal markers of intestinal inflammation/injury and immune activation, and indices of fatigue. The team then crossed twenty-two participants over to groups receiving gluten (16 g/d), whey (16 g/d), or control (no additional protein) diets for 3 days, using visual analogue scales to evaluate symptoms. They found that gastrointestinal symptoms consistently and significantly improved for all patients during reduced FODMAP intake, but significantly worsened to a similar degree when their diets included gluten or whey protein. The team saw gluten-specific effects in just 8% of study subjects. They saw no diet-specific changes in any biomarker. During the 3-day re-challenge, participants’ symptoms increased by similar levels among groups. Gluten-specific gastrointestinal effects were not reproduced. An order effect was observed. A placebo-controlled, cross-over re-challenge study showed no evidence of specific or dose-dependent effects of gluten in patients with NCGS placed diets low in FODMAPs. Source: Gastroenterology, Volume 145, Issue 2, Pages 320-328.e3, August 2013. More info on the FODMAP diet from Stanford Univerisity.
  5. Celiac.com 09/12/2013 - Good news for consumers of gluten-free foods and other products: The FDA's new standards for the labeling of gluten-free food and other products apply to all foods and products labeled gluten-free, including dietary supplements and vitamins. The FDA rules state that any product declaring the contents to be "gluten-free," "no gluten," "free of gluten" or "without gluten," must meet all parts of FDA's gluten-free definition, including the requirement that the food contains less than 20 parts per million of gluten. People with celiac disease who consume gluten from wheat, rye, or barley risk gradual damage to the intestines, leading to poor absorption of vitamins and minerals and leading to a host of other health problems, including nutritional deficiencies, osteoporosis, miscarriages, and cancer," according to Virginia Cox, Associate Commissioner of FDA's Office of External Affairs. Creating uniform rules and conditions for the use of the term 'gluten-free' in the labeling of foods and other products is "necessary to ensure that individuals with celiac disease are not misled and are provided with truthful and accurate information with respect to foods so labeled, " according to the text of the final rule, which was published last week in the Federal Register. FDA projects the new requirements will yield annual health benefits of roughly $110 million, compared to estimated annual costs (related to testing and relabeling) of $7 million. Manufacturers of gluten-free foods and products will have one year to comply with the FDA's labeling requirements. Source: http://www.naturalproductsinsider.com/news/2013/08/fda-gluten-free-definition-applies-to-dietary-sup.aspx
  6. Celiac.com 02/13/2013 - A team of researchers wanted to determine whether levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG) were associated with a later diagnosis of a non-affective psychotic disorder. The researchers included H. Karlsson, Å. Blomström, S. Wicks, S. Yang, R.H. Yolken, and C. Dalman. They are affiliated with the Department of Neuroscience at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden. To accomplish their goal, the team analyzed archival dried blood spots taken from newborns in Sweden between 1975 and 1985 with verified register-based diagnoses of non-affective psychoses made between 1987 and 2003 and comparison subjects matched on sex, date of birth, birth hospital, and municipality. The team reviewed samples from a total of 211 case subjects and 553 comparison subjects who agreed to take part in the study. They pulled data for factors associated with maternal status, pregnancy, and delivery from the Swedish Medical Birth Register. They used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to analyze the results for levels of IgG directed at gliadin (a component of gluten) and casein (a milk protein) in eluates from dried blood spots. They then calculated odds ratios for levels of IgG directed at gliadin or casein for non-affective psychosis. Comparison subjects associated with non-affective psychosis showed levels of anti-gliadin IgG (but not anti-casein IgG) above the 90th percentile of levels observed (odds ratio=1.7, 95% CI=1.1-2.8). This connections was not affected by differences in maternal age, immigrant status, or mode of delivery. They also found that gestational age at birth, ponderal index, and birth weight were not associated with maternal levels of anti-gliadin IgG. From their study, they concluded that high levels of anti-gliadin IgG in the maternal circulation are associated with an elevated risk for the development of a non-affective psychosis in offspring. They point out that more research is needed to identify the mechanisms underlying this association in order to develop preventive strategies. Source: Am J Psychiatry. 2012 Jun;169(6):625-32. doi: 10.1176/appi.ajp.2012.11081197.
  7. Wellesse’s Digestive 3-In-1 Health liquid dietary supplement provides prebiotics and soluble fiber, (which are both key to maintaining healthy gut microbiotia) as well as aloe vera to balance stomach acidity. These are all important supplements for maintaining a healthy digestive system and Wellesse brings them all together in a form that the body can easily absorb. Taken with juice, the supplement is very easy to fit into your morning routine (perhaps easier than pills, for those who have trouble swallowing them). After a week or two, I was noticing more digestive regularity, I was feeling full from meals quicker and I had dramatically reduced acid reflux. Overall, my digestive system feels… well, healthier. Wellesse’s Digestive 3-in-1 Health Liquid Dietary Supplement makes a great digestive health ‘cocktail’. Just be sure to take some kind of probiotic supplement as well. Visit their site for more info: www.wellesse.com. Note: Articles that appear in the "Gluten-Free Food Reviews" section of this site are paid advertisements. For more information about this see our Advertising Page.
  8. I have always been a little unsure what to think of probiotics. My mother raised me to take acidophilus supplements religiously, but I could never find any evidence to suggest that the pills actually improved my health. After two weeks taking Vidazorb Super C Chewable Probiotics, I think I have my first substantial evidence that probiotics actually do something. At first, I didn't notice much change, but about a week after I started taking the chewable tablets, I realized that it had been a while since I had suffered indigestion. Prior to this, at least a meal or two a week just wouldn't sit right in my stomach. I have no known allergies or sensitivities, and it didn't seem like I was responding to any particular ingredients, just every now and then, my stomach would seem to not like something I ate. I don't know what was going on, but in the two weeks (and counting) I've been taking Vidazorb Super C Chewable Probiotics, I haven't had indigestion problems once. Additionally, I seem to be getting acid reflux less as well (I usually get that at least a few times a week). I am very happy with the results I've gotten from Vidazorb Super C Chewable Probiotics. The fact that they're chewable (and actually taste pretty decent), calorie-free and non-refrigerated makes them fit easily into my daily routine. I highly recommend them to anyone hoping to improve their digestive health. For more information, visit their website. Use coupon code "CELIAC" for 20% off through 9/30/12! Note: Articles that appear in the "Gluten-Free Food Reviews" section of this site are paid advertisements. For more information about this see our Advertising Page.
  9. Celiac.com 02/24/2012 - Currently, testing for anti tissue-transglutaminase antibodies is the standard of celiac disease blood testing. The test has a high sensitivity in patients who are eating a diet that contains gluten, but poor sensitivity for people on a gluten-free diet. So, it's not much use for measuring gluten-free diet success in people with celiac disease. A research team set out to determine if a new test might be more useful than current standard in assessing long-term gluten exposure in celiac disease patients attempting to follow a gluten-free diet. The new test measures Immunoglobulin-A antibodies to catalytically active open conformation tissue-transglutaminase. The study team included K. Pallav, D. A. Leffler, M. Bennett, S. Tariq, H. Xu, T. Kabbani, A. C. Moss, M. Dennis, C. P. Kelly, D. Schuppan. They are affiliated with the Celiac Center of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center at Harvard Medical School in Boston. The team made a preliminary dietary assessment of 147 patients with celiac disease, and grouped them according to good or poor compliance to a gluten-free diet. The team used 50 patients with inflammatory bowel disease as a control group. The team then measured both open (new test) and closed (conventional) tissue-transglutaminase levels using standard enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The team's initial dietary review indicated that 128 of the celiac patients had followed a gluten free diet for more than six months. They found 19 to have poor compliance to a gluten-free diet. Of the 19 who had poor adherence to a gluten-free diet, the team found 13 patients (68.4%) who tested positive using open conformation assay (p=0.51), while ten of the 19 patients (52.6%) tested positive using conventional assay (p=0.51). In the control group, just two patients tested positive using closed assay, while one tested positive using open assay. The team concluded that, compared to conventional testing, open conformation tissue-transglutaminase may offer greater sensitivity in the poor gluten-free diet adherence group and higher specificity in the control population. The team suggests studies on larger populations to determine whether open conformation tissue-transglutaminase assay may be superior to the conventional assay in measuring compliance with a gluten-free diet. Source: Dig Liver Dis. 2012 Jan 17.
  10. Celiac.com 11/23/2011 - Osteopenia and osteoporosis, both conditions in which bone density is less than optimal, are often seen in people with celiac disease at the time of their diagnosis. There have been conflicting data as to whether a gluten free diet can improve bone density. Researchers in Argentina set out to determine if celiac patients suffer more peripheral fractures than a control population, and to assess the effects of a gluten free diet on fracture risk. Their results are reported in the July 7, 2011 issue of the World Journal of Gastroenterology. They recruited 256 people who had been diagnosed with celiac at least five years before the study began in March, 2007, asked them if they had ever broken any bones and, if so, which. They then compared their answers to answers obtained from 530 age- and sex- matched controls with functional gastrointestinal disorders. People with other disorders that could reduce bone health – like thyroid dysfunction, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and diabetes – as well as those taking vitamin D, steroids, calcium supplements or other medications that could affect bone metabolism were excluded. They found that celiacs had a higher rate and risk of first peripheral fracture before diagnosis – but this effect only achieved statistical significance for men. This increased risk was also associated with a classical clinical presentation; those with atypical or silent forms of celiac did not exhibit the same risk. Although the finding that being male increases a celiac’s risk of peripheral fractures is intriguing, it must be borne out by larger studies – only 42 of the 256 celiacs included in this study were male. After maintaining a gluten free diet for five years, the elevated risk of fractures was gone. The authors speculate that eliminating gluten may reduce the risk of fractures in celiac patients not necessarily by increasing bone mass and mineral density, but by improving body mass and fat/ muscle composition, nutritional status, and bone architecture. Despite its limited scope, the take home message of this study is clear; if you have celiac disease, strictly adhering to a gluten free diet is good not just for your intestines, immune system, and skin; it is also good for your bones. Source: Sanchez et al. Risk of fracture in celiac disease: Gender, dietary compliance, or both? World J. Gastroenterol 2011 July 7; 17(25).
  11. Celiac.com 07/20/2010 - Anyone who's tried to maintain a gluten-free diet for celiac disease or other reasons can likely tell stories about the difficulties and challenges they face on a regular basis. Still, very little research has been done regarding the psychological and social challenges faced by people with celiac disease who are attempting to follow a gluten-free diet. Scientists in India recently conducted just such a study. A research team set out to assess psychological and social challenges faced by Indian children with celiac disease who are attempting to follow a gluten-free diet. The research team included Srikanta Basu, J. C. Chauhan, A. K. Dutta, Praveen Kumar, and Arun Kumar from the Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Pediatrics at Lady Hardinge Medical College and Associated Kalawati Saran Children Hospital in New Delhi, India. Their goal was to assess dietary compliance to gluten-free diet, to identify barriers to compliance, and to study the impact of diet on the psychosocial behavior of children with celiac disease. For the study, the team looked at children with clinically proven celiac disease, who had been observed for at least 6 months. They then evaluated the children for gluten-free diet compliance. Researchers who were blinded to initial results then interviewed patients using a self-administered questionnaire. The team measured psychosocial parameters using the standard 35-item Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC). To determine what factors might affect dietary compliance, the team compared the results of children who were compliant with their gluten-free diets to those who were not-compliant. They then compared the psychosocial parameters of both groups to those of healthy control subjects. The team measured a total of 70 patients for dietary compliance. They found 53 children to be compliant with a gluten-free diet (75%). They found 13 were non-compliant with a gluten-free diet (18%), while 4 children were likely non-compliant. A total of 64 children completed the full assessment. Final analysis showed that 4 of those children were likely non-compliant. Data for 2 patients with incomplete assessments was dropped. Younger kids showed higher compliance with a gluten-free diet than did teens. 80% of younger kids showed compliance with a gluten-free diet, compared with just 44% of teens. Gluten-free diet compliance was also higher in children with higher maternal education, and in parents with better knowledge and understanding of celiac disease, and in nuclear families. Higher family income raised compliance levels. Children with 2 or fewer siblings did better, with compliance rates of 68.3% and just 23% non-compliance. 72% of kids who were compliant with a gluten-free diet had presented classic symptoms of celiac disease, while only 15% of this group was non-compliant. Adjustment-related challenges, such as difficulty in maintaining diet at school, restaurants, trips, etc. are among the most common problems faced by celiac children. Nearly half (45%) of the children complained that teachers did not adequately understand the challenges of their condition. Researchers established a PSC cutoff point of 4 for children in the dietary non-compliant group. Generally, kids with celiac disease did not show higher levels of symptoms, such as complaints of aches and pains; being irritable/angry; not listening to rules, blaming other for mistakes; teasing others; refusing to share. The study findings show that about 1 in 5 (18%) people with celiac disease fail to comply with their gluten free diet, and that kids who comply with a gluten-free diet have better psychosocial parameters, as measured by PSC score. Also, adolescents, kids in joint families, and kids in larger families tend to have greater non-compliance levels. Successful treatment of celiac disease requires full compliance with a gluten-free diet. Non-compliance increases risk factors for numerous celiac-associated conditions. Knowing which factors are most likely to present challenges for maintaining compliance can provide celiac suffers and clinicians with useful tools for reducing those challenges and increasing compliance. Source: Indian Journal of Pediatrics 2010 Jun;77(6):649-54. DOI 10.1007/s12098-010-0092-3
  12. Celiac.com 04/28/2008 - A life-long gluten-free diet is currently the only treatment for celiac disease. However, many foods thought to be gluten-free actually contain small amounts of gluten, making it difficult to maintain a truly gluten-free diet. Gluten is made up of glutenin and gliadin proteins. Gliadin is only partially digested in the small intestine and the resulting peptides are responsible for the inflammation and intestinal tissue damage in people with celiac disease. Because probiotic bacteria have been shown to digest gluten proteins to harmless peptides, supplementation with probiotics may be beneficial for people with celiac disease. To begin testing this hypothesis, researchers in Finland added probiotic bacteria to cultures of intestinal epithelial cells (cells that line the intestine) to determine their effect on gliadin-induced cellular damage. Gliadin-induced damage to intestinal epithelial cells includes increased permeability of the epithelial layer, alteration of tight junctions between cells (which controls the passage of materials across the intestinal wall), and structural changes such as “ruffling” of the cell edges. Two probiotic bacterial species were evaluated: Lactobacillus fermentum and Bifidobacterium lactis. In this study, B. lactis was able to inhibit permeability caused by gliadin. Additionally, both B. lactis and L. fermentum were able to protect against cell ruffling and alterations in tight junctions. The bacteria alone (without gliadin) did not cause any significant changes to the intestinal epithelial cells. Researchers concluded that Bifidobacterium lactis may be a useful addition to a gluten-free diet. Supplementation with this probiotic appears to be able to reduce the damage caused by eating gluten-contaminated foods and may even accelerate healing after initiating a gluten-free diet. It is important to note the researchers do not suggest that supplementation with probiotics could take the place of a gluten-free diet in the treatment of celiac disease. Lindfors et al. Live probiotic Bifidobacterium lactis bacteria inhibit the toxic effects induced by wheat gliadin in epithelial cell culture - Clin Exp Immunol. 2008 Apr 16.
  13. Celiac.com 07/01/2006 - Scientists have discovered what may be a successful non-dietary therapy for celiac sprue, an inherited inflammatory disorder of the small intestine that impacts an estimated 1 in 200 people around the world. Two research studies, published in the June issue of Chemistry and Biology, pave the way for clinical testing with an oral enzyme therapy that may prevent the many symptoms and complications of this widespread disease. People with celiac sprue, also called celiac disease, cannot tolerate the protein gluten in their diet. Gluten is present in grains like wheat, barley, and rye. When gluten is ingested by a celiac patient, it sets off an inflammatory reaction that damages the small intestine, leading to malabsorption, an autoimmune-like response, and many other complications. The only effective therapy for celiac disease is complete dietary exclusion of gluten. However, the ubiquitous nature of gluten poses a constant threat to celiacs, and a majority of celiac patients who adopt a restrictive diet still exhibit structural and functional gut abnormalities. "Non-dietary therapies that allow celiac patients to safely incorporate low-to-moderate levels of gluten into their daily diet would be of considerable benefit," explains study leader Dr. Chaitan Khosla, from Stanford University and Celiac Sprue Research Foundation. "Having demonstrated earlier that certain types of enzymes can detoxify gluten, our laboratory set out to devise an optimal oral enzyme therapy for celiac sprue by borrowing from nature. In germinating barley seed, gluten serves as a nutritious storage protein that is efficiently digested by enzymes. One enzyme, EP-B2, plays a crucial role in this process by breaking gluten proteins after glutamine residues, which comprise one-third of all amino acid residues in gluten." Dr. Khoslas group used recombinant bacteria to produce a form of EP-B2 that only activates under acidic conditions similar to the conditions found in the human stomach. The researchers demonstrated that EP-B2 efficiently digested gluten protein under gastric conditions and, importantly, EP-B2 was most specific for those parts of gluten that are known to trigger celiac pathogenesis. In a second study, the researchers went on to devise an even more potent double enzyme therapy for detoxifying gluten. EP-B2 was tested in combination with another well-characterized enzyme called PEP that breaks gluten protein after proline residues. Like glutamine, proline is also abundant in inflammatory gluten peptides. At very high gluten loads, where neither PEP nor EP-B2 alone could detoxify gluten quickly enough to prevent inflammation, a PEP and EP-B2 combination completely abolished gluten immunotoxicity within ten minutes under simulated gastric and duodenal conditions. In this tag-team therapy, EP-B2 first cleaved gluten into small pieces under gastric conditions that were then easier for PEP to fully detoxify under duodenal conditions. "Our results suggest that recombinant EP-B2 should be effective as supportive therapy to help celiacs cope with the hidden gluten in everyday life, and that a two-enzyme cocktail containing PEP and EP-B2 may even allow celiacs to resume a more normal diet in the future," offers Dr. Khosla. References: Seigel et al. The researchers include Matthew Siegel, Michael T. Bethune, Jiang Xia, Alexandre Johannsen, Tor B. Stuge, and Peter P. Lee of Stanford University in Stanford, CA; Jonathan Gass, Jennifer Ehren, Gary M. Gray, and Chaitan Khosla of Stanford University in Stanford, CA and Celiac Sprue Research Foundation in Palo Alto, CA. This research was supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (R01 DK63158 to C.K. and Mary Hewitt Loveless, MD Pilot-Project Grant to P.P.L.). Siegel et al.: "Rational Design of Combination Enzyme Therapy for Celiac Sprue." Publishing in Chemistry & Biology 13, 649–658, June 2006 DOI 10.1016/j.chembiol.2006.04.009 www.chembiol.com Bethune et al. The researchers include Michael T. Bethune, Yinyan Tang, and Chaitan Khosla of Stanford University in Stanford, CA; Pavel Strop of Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Stanford University in Stanford, CA; Ludvig M. Sollid of University of Oslo and Rikshospitalet University Hospital in Oslo, Norway. This research was supported by R01 DK063158 to C.K. M.T.B. is a recipient of a National Institutes of Health Cellular and Molecular Biology Training Grant through Stanford University. Bethune et al.: "Heterologous Expression, Purification, Refolding, and Structural-Functional Characterization of EP-B2, a Self-Activating Barley Cysteine Endoprotease." Publishing in Chemistry & Biology 13, 637–647, June 2006 DOI 10.1016/j.chembiol.2006.04.008 www.chembiol.com. Contact: Heidi Hardman Tel: (617) 397-2879
  14. Paul V, Henkerr J, Todt H, Eysold R. Z.Klin.Med., 1985; 40: 707-709. In this study 90 EEGs were performed on 58 celiac children. Researchers concluded that abnormal brain waves resulted from the ingestion of gluten by celiac children. They also concluded that a gluten challenge should not be given before a child reaches the age of 6 years old, and the challenge should not last longer than 5 months. The researchers main concern seems to be the risk of permanent brain damage that they believe could be caused in a celiac child who eats gluten for a prolonged period of time.
  15. Celiac.com 08/10/2001 - The Celiac Sprue Association, under the new leadership of Mary Schluckebier, has recently taken an important step towards eliminating the lingering confusion surrounding its position on gluten-free foods. According to Janet Rinehart, the CSAs "Basics for a Celiac Diet" guidelines have recently been revised to include the following key changes: Canola oil is not mentioned (except where you might assume the connection for "general recommendations for those with a depressed immune system)." Rather than stating that quinoa, amaranth and teff are not safe for the celiac diet, the document now says: "Some celiacs have demonstrated toxicity or sensitivities to the following cereals: quinoa, amaranth and teff." Distilled vinegar, however, is still on the CSAs "Low Gluten Items to Avoid List." The CSA still maintains that distilled vinegar and alcohol are "questionable," even if there is no detectable gluten/gliadin in them, and even though the Gluten Intolerance Group (GIG), Celiac Disease Foundation (CDF) and the new guidelines from the American Dietetic Association (ADA) all include them on their safe lists . The CSA urges celiacs to ascertain the source of any questionable ingredients from their manufacturers. The CSAs new version of their "Celiac Disease Self-Management Chart for the Clinical Diet" advocates: A "self-management" approach to the diet, where the first stage is to eliminate anything questionable -conservative approach. Zero gluten is the goal. The second stage is to develop good methods for questioning products and controversial items/information. Then introduce new items, one at a time, at least two weeks apart. The third stage is to maintain a stable diet, using as many tools as possible. There is also a sample Food Diary Chart to use when beginning the zero gluten diet to track your meal planning (be sure to include brand names for reference). According to Janet Rinehart the CSAs new guidelines "are not incompatible with the new ADA recommendations in the later stages." Further: "We can use the CSA diet to start with, and then use the ADA recommendations and those published by GIG/CDF, depending on individual food sensitivities." She urges celiacs and support groups to quite blaming the CSA and instead work together to contribute positively to the success of all celiacs in all groups.
  16. This approach has great promise for improving the quality of future gluten-free products--here is a related article. Celiac.com 10/11/2005 - Arcadia Biosciences, an agricultural biotechnology company focused on products that benefit the environment and human health, today announced that it has received a Small Business Technology Transfer Program (STTR) grant from the National Institutes of Health in partnership with Washington State University (WSU) to research novel lines of wheat with reduced celiac disease-causing proteins. The grant will be split equally between Arcadia and its academic collaborator at WSU, Dr. Diter von Wettstein, the R.A. Nilan Distinguished Professor in the Department of Crop and Soil Science. Nearly 1 percent of American people and 4 percent of European people are estimated to suffer from celiac disease, or gluten intolerance. This genetic disorder can create symptoms that range from chronic diarrhea to malnutrition. Studies also indicate that celiac disease sufferers who continue to eat gluten are between 40 and 100 times more likely to develop gastrointestinal cancer than non-celiac disease sufferers. The only known treatment for celiac disease is adherence to a gluten-free diet, which includes complete abstinence from wheat, rye, barley, and their derivatives. "New diagnostic tests continue to identify people who suffer from celiac disease and who need to make extreme dietary adjustments," said Eric Rey, president of Arcadia Biosciences. "This grant is the first step in our effort to identify and develop wheat varieties that can significantly expand the dietary options for people on gluten-free diets. Our goal is to help enable people who suffer from celiac disease to enjoy wheat-based products, like bread and cookies, and not experience an adverse reaction." Working with Dr. von Wettstein and his colleagues at WSU, Arcadia will use its proprietary TILLING® technology to identify wheat plants in which harmful gluten proteins are minimized. Arcadias current product pipeline includes six technologies that either protect the environment or improve human health. The company expects to launch its first product, GLA-enriched safflower oil, to the nutritional supplement market in 2008. Other technologies include higher-yielding plants that use less nitrogen fertilizer, salt-tolerant plants, and fresh produce with high levels of antioxidants such as lycopene. These products are being developed using both genetic engineering and advanced breeding technologies.
  17. Dig Dis Sci 2000;45:403-406. (Celiac.com 04/10/2000) Italian researcher Dr. Tarcisio Not, of Clinica Pediatrica, I.R.C.C.S., Trieste, and colleagues, have concluded that a relatively high percentage of patients with autoimmune thyroiditis also have celiac disease. They studied 172 patients who had autoimmune thyroid disorders, and two control groups. Their control groups were comprised of 498 patients with other diseases, and 4,000 healthy patients. The method used by the researchers was a blood test that looks for IgA-class endomysium antibodies using immunofluorescence. Their results, which were published in the February issue of Digestive Diseases and Sciences, show that the prevalence of celiac disease is 3.4% in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis, compared with 0.6% and 0.25% among the two control groups. They also found a connection between untreated celiac disease, gluten consumption, and autoimmune disorders. The researchers believe that undiagnosed celiac disease can cause other disorders by switching on some as yet unknown immunological mechanism. Untreated celiac patients produce organ-specific autoantibodies. Further, By following these subjects longitudinally, it has been seen that not only do the anti-gliadin antibodies and anti-endomysium antibodies disappear after 3 to 6 months of a gluten-free diet, but so do the organ-specific autoantibodies. In conclusion the Italian researchers suggest that patients with autoimmune thyroiditis could benefit from a screening for celiac disease, which could eliminate the symptoms and limit the risk of developing other autoimmune disorders.
  18. Proteins ingested by mother can appear in the breast milk. There is well known disease in breast fed babies called eosinophilic colitis, which causes eosinophilic infiltration in the large intestine of the babies and clinically presents as rectal bleeding. The therapy is very simple: the mother stops ingesting cow milk and cow milk products and the babies do not have bleeding and they are completely well. Based on this clinical syndrome, the same possibility exists for the presence of gluten peptides in Human milk. Studies on this have been done by Dr. Reichelt.
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