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Found 5 results

  1. Celiac.com 09/20/2018 - Some people with celiac disease experience extreme symptoms when they eat gluten. These folks adopt various strategies for navigating the world. One of those strategies involves getting a gluten-sniffing service dog. We’ve done a few stories on gluten-sniffing dogs over the years. Dogs like Zeus and Hawkeye are famous for helping their owners sniff out gluten before they can eat it. Can Gluten-Sniffing Dogs Help People with Celiac Disease? The stories are always popular. People love the stories, and people love the dogs. After all, pretty much anyone with celiac disease who has ever read about gluten-sniffing dogs would love to have one. Who could say no to a warm, fuzzy dog that can take a sniff of your food and signal you when it contains gluten? The stories almost always generate plenty of feedback and more than a few questions. To answer some of those questions, we’ve decided to do an article that provides some facts about gluten-sniffing dogs. Here are a few factors to keep in mind about gluten-sniffing service dogs: Gluten-free Dog Status: One thing to remember is that proper gluten-sniffing dogs are professionally trained service animals, much like seeing-eye dogs or hearing-ear dogs. As professional service animals, the dogs must be trained and certified as service animals. The dogs may then accompany their master pretty much anywhere they go, and are available to assess all food and snacks. Gluten-free Dog Training: Proper training takes time, which equals money. Professional trainers might only train one or two dogs, and the training can take about a year. There are very few trainers for gluten-sniffing dogs, and there are also currently no official guidelines or certification. Gluten-free Dog Cost: In our recent story on the gluten-sniffing black Lab, Hawkeye, we noted that the dog cost $16,000, not including food, and vet bills. Gluten-free Dog Reliability: Nimasensor.com notes that “[g]luten-sniffing dogs may detect gluten in amounts as small as .0025 parts per million with 95 percent to 98 percent accuracy.” The Mercola.com website says that Willow, a gluten-sniffing German shorthaired pointer in Michigan, can detect gluten with 95 percent to 98 percent accuracy. Read more on gluten-sniffing dogs: Gluten-Sniffing Dogs Are Game Changers for People With Celiac Disease Gluten-sniffing dogs help people with celiac disease What to Know About Gluten-Sniffing Dogs Gluten-Sniffing Assistance Dog Helps Celiac Sufferer Lead Normal Life
  2. Celiac.com 09/17/2018 - Her name is Hawkeye, she’s a black lab, and her mission is to detect gluten for a young man named Toby, who gets terribly sick if he eats food that contains gluten. Hawkeye is up to 98% accurate at detecting gluten with just a few sniffs. Hawkeye was also expensive, costing a princely $16,000, not including food, and vet bills. That may sound expensive, but, says Toby’s mom, Amy "when you think about it trainers are often training only one to two dogs at a time and our trainer, she only trained one dog at a time and it took a year.” In Toby’s case, the community rallied to raise the money to buy Hawkeye, who is a registered service dog, and so can accompany Toby nearly everywhere. Everyone loves Hawkeye and her role in Toby’s life. Amy calls Hawkeye a “life-giver, and says that Amy continued “she's breathed life and confidence into Toby that we haven't seen in a really long time." She adds that the family has “really seen just growth and development in him because he's not getting sick as often and he's now able to learn more. So he can now say his alphabet, learn his numbers and colors, things that just a year ago he wasn't doing." Gluten-sniffing dogs are rare, but their numbers are growing. The Mercola.com website says that Willow, a gluten-sniffing German shorthaired pointer in Michigan, can detect gluten with 95 percent to 98 percent accuracy. The website Nimasensor.com notes that “[g]luten-sniffing dogs may detect gluten in amounts as small as .0025 parts per million with 95 percent to 98 percent accuracy.” Love the idea of a gluten sniffing dog, but maybe daunted by the price, logistics or commitment? There are portable gluten sensors currently on the market, with greater accuracy than Hawkeye, for a few hundred dollars. Disclosure: Nima Labs is a paid advertiser for Celiac.com
  3. Celiac.com 08/15/2018 - Grain-free food has been linked to heart disease in dogs. A canine cardiovascular disease that has historically been seen in just a few breeds is becoming more common in other breeds, and one possible culprit is grain-free dog food. The disease in question is called canine dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), and often results in congestive heart failure. DCM is historically common in large dogs such as Great Danes, Newfoundlands, Irish Wolfhounds, Saint Bernards and Doberman Pinschers, though it is also affects some Cocker Spaniels. Numerous cases of DCM have been reported in smaller dogs, whose primary source of nutrition was food containing peas, lentils, other legume seeds or potatoes as main ingredients. These reported atypical DCM cases included Golden and Labrador Retrievers, a Whippet, a Shih Tzu, a Bulldog and Miniature Schnauzers, as well as mixed breeds. As a result, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Center for Veterinary Medicine, along with a group of veterinary diagnostic laboratories, is investigating the possible link between DCM and pet foods containing seeds or potatoes as main ingredients. The good news is that in cases where the dog suffers no genetic component, and the disease is caught early, simple veterinary treatment and dietary change may improve heart function. According to Nutritional Outlook, an industry publication for makers of dietary supplements and healthy foods and beverages, there is a growing market for “free from” foods for dogs, especially gluten-free and grain-free formulations. In 2017, about one in five dog foods launched was gluten-free. So, do dogs really need to eat grain-free or gluten-free food? Probably not, according to PetMD, which notes that many pet owners are simply projecting their own food biases when choosing dog food. Genetically, dogs are well adapted to easily digest grains and other carbohydrates. Also, beef and dairy remain the most common allergens for dogs, so even dogs with allergies are unlikely to need to need grain-free food. So, the take away here seems to be that most dogs don’t need grain-free or gluten-free food, and that it might actually be bad for the dog, not good, as the owner might imagine. Stay tuned for more on the FDA’s investigation and any findings they make. Read more at Bizjournals.com
  4. hello Me and my family are brand new dog owners and we have had our dog Lucy for a week today, my mother and brother have celiac so we had to buy gluten free dog food to keep my brother and mother from getting sick, we've been using natural balance gluten free dog food for about a week now and yesturaday my mother informed me that on the back of the bag in the ingredients it said that it had oats in it, which is something that my mother and brother cant have because of the allergy. We are now on the look for a new food that truthfully doesn't contain and gluten or wheat inside, do you have any recommendations? thanks,Alexa
  5. Not sure where to put this , I have always cooked for my dog. I am great friends with the people I got him from , he has always been thinner , just healthier looking,Than his sisters and brothers , mom and dad. I am wondering if it isn't because of his diet? He eats very little dog food. He gets cooked chicken or what ever meat we eat and it gets poured over his dog food. Then he wants some cheese, usually American cheese slices, 2 slices , he sometimes eats a few kernels of dog food but really for a Shitz tzu he eats maby a 5 - 10 lb bag of dog food a year .. I have seen so many dog food companies go natural , or lets say put some "More" natural dog food on the market lately! It isn't just us!! It is animals also that is having problems with the stuff they put on the market!! I don't know I have always wondered why my dog looks so much better that all his "Family" I think now.. It is because he has natural food cooked for him!! He is not heavy and over weight and bloated like his brothers , sisters , mom and dad! It is all the natural cooking!! hmmm yep starting to see something here!
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