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Found 5 results

  1. Celiac.com 03/07/2019 - Researchers don’t have much good data on the distribution of the related alleles in the type 1 diabetes Iranian population. In an effort to generate better data, a team of researchers recently set out to assess the frequency of HLA DQ2 and DQ8 haplotypes in patients with type 1 diabetes, with and without celiac disease, and to compare them to the healthy population. The research team included Ali Moheb-Alian, Flora Forouzesh, Amir Sadeghia, Kamran Rostami, Elham Aghamohammadi, Mohammad Rostami-Nejad, Mostafa Rezaei-Tavirani, and Mohammad Reza Zali. The team looked at 70 type 1 diabetes patients who did not have celiac disease, 60 type 1 diabetes cases with celiac disease, and compared them with 150 healthy individuals. They collected ten milliliter Gheparinized blood samples, extracted genomic DNA, and genotyped alleles in Real-time PCR using SYBR Green as a low-resolution method. They found HLA-DQ2 genotypes in 51% of type 1 diabetes patients without celiac disease, and HLA-DQ8 in 23% of such patients. Just over twenty percent of those patients carried both alleles, while 5% carried neither allele. More than 70% of type 1 diabetes patients with celiac disease had DQ2, while nearly 12% carried DQ8. Compared to diabetes patients without celiac disease and the control group, 14% carry both alleles, and 3% carrying neither allele. The frequencies of DQ2 and DQ8 alleles in Iranian healthy population were 19 and 5% respectively. The similarities in genetic background for celiac disease and type 1 diabetes show that HLA-typing can be serve as a helpful tool for spotting celiac disease in people with type one diabetes. Read more in the Journal of Diabetes and its Complicationshttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2018.10.001 The researchers are variously affiliated with the Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases Research Center, Research Institute for Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; the Department of Genetics, Tehran Medical Sciences Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran; the Department of Gastroenterology MidCentral District Health Board, Palmerston North Hospital, New Zealand; the Basic and Molecular Epidemiology of Gastrointestinal Disorders Research Center, Research Institute for Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; and the Proteomics Research Center, Faculty of Paramedical Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  2. Celiac.com 10/18/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to investigate the prevalence of human leukocyte antigens (HLA) DQ2 and DQ8 haplotypes, two common polymorphisms associate with celiac disease, in women who have had previous stillbirth, but who do not have celiac disease. The research team included Mauro Cozzolino, Caterina Serena, Antonino Salvatore Calabró, Elena Savi Marianna, Pina Rambaldi, Serena Simeone, and Serena Ottanelli, Giorgio Mello, Giovanni Rombolá, Gianmarco Troiano, Nicola Nante, Silvia Vannuccini, Federico Mecacci, and Felice Petraglia. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and the Department of Experimental and Clinical Biomedical Sciences, Gastroenterology Unit, at Careggi University Hospital, University of Florence in Florence, Italy. For their study, the team enrolled 56 women with history of unexplained term stillbirth referred to our Center for High‐Risk Pregnancies for a preconception counseling. As a control group, they enrolled 379 women with previous uncomplicated pregnancies. They excluded women with celiac women from the study. The team then conducted genetic tests for HLA DQ2/DQ8 on both groups, and compared patients data against controls. They found that 50% of women with history of unexplained term stillbirth tested positive for HLA‐DQ2 or DQ8, compared with just 29.5% for controls. Women with HLA DQ8 genotype showed a substantially higher risk of stillbirth (OR: 2.84 CI: 1.1840‐6.817). For patients with the DQ2 genotype, the OR for stillbirth was even higher, at 4.46 with a CI of 2.408‐8.270. In the stillbirth group, the team found that SGA neonates in 85.7% those with HLA‐DQ2/DQ8 haplotypes, and in just 42.8% with negative genetic testing. The team found significantly higher rates of HLA DQ2/DQ8 haplotypes in women with history of unexplained term stillbirth than in women with previous uneventful pregnancies. Moreover, they found that HLA DQ2/DQ8 positivity was significantly associated with suboptimal fetal growth in intrauterine fetal death cases, as shown by an increased prevalence of SGA babies. This study will definitely be of interest to women with HLA DQ2/DQ8 haplotypes, and to those who have experienced unexplained stillbirths. Stay tuned for more information on this important topic as news becomes available. Read more at: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology
  3. I have struggled with 'bowel issues' for a long time, colonoscopies have only elicited a diagnosis of IBS. Several years ago I went to a funcitonal medicine doctor who noted that I had 'a reaction' to gluten w/ some elevated bloodwork and recommended I not eat gluten. After 18 months, these markers decreased. Fast forward a few years later (and a few bowls of pasta, pieces of bread, etc)....my autoimmune markers are elevated again. Question though: back when I was being seen the doctor checked the 'celiac gene' of DQ2 and DQ8....I was 'negative' for both. But my tissue transglutaminase (tTG), IgA was elevated at the time. It went down when I stopped eating gluten for an amt of time. Now I checked again and it's a 10 (when the normal is 2 or below). So....can tTG be slightly elevated in the absence of the DQ2 and DQ8 genetic component? Or is 10 not even slightly but just full blown? I really don't want to get a biopsy although I know its the 'gold standard' ....
  4. This site is amazing and so helpful. I'm always on it but this is my first post. In short, I have been completely gluten free (except for accidental gluttenings) for more than a year. I had a laundry list of symptom for more than ten years and all testing (no Celiac, gluten-intolerance testing was done) showed nothing. I was told for years that I had IBS and to take meds and that's all that could be done. This wasn't enough for me so I tried a gluten free diet on my own. I didn't know then that I shouldve had an antibody test first. ALL of my symptoms are gone and I no longer have a need for all the rx meds! If I am accidentally gluttened, I'm severely sick. I can't move for about a week and my body hurts all over. The brain fog is so bad that when I "snap out of it", I literally feel like the past few days are a complete blur. So, while I will never add gluten back to my diet, I still would like to know if I am celiac or non-celiac gluten intolerant. Also, my mom's side of the family has many signs of celiac throughout history. Colitis, colon cancer, diabetes, multiple miscarriages for one relative, etc...So, I requested my primary order a gene test. As most doctors I've worked with, she didnt know much about it or celiac. I did the research and told her what genes to request. Results came back negative for DQ8 and Half Positive for DQ2. That's the short of it. Of course, there are a lot of numbers and what may be chains (?) listed. I don't understand all of that. I dont understand tTA or rtg, etc..or other testing numbers I read about on these forums that others have results for or if I was even tested for any of that. My question is can I be celiac with half the DQ2 gene? If so, how can I go about getting a "diagnosis"? Is an actual diagnosis even important and why? Third, IF I am celiac and I maintain a strict gluten-free diet, are there other concerns with having celiac? Am I still at a risk for malnutrition or other diseases/ailments? Any other advice would be greatly appreciated as well! Thanks!
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