Jump to content
Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease Read more... ×
  • Sign Up

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'drug'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Diagnosis & Recovery, Related Disorders & Research
    • Calendar of Events
    • Celiac Disease Pre-Diagnosis, Testing & Symptoms
    • Post Diagnosis, Recovery & Treatment of Celiac Disease
    • Related Disorders & Celiac Research
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis
    • Gluten Sensitivity and Behavior
  • Support & Help
    • Coping with Celiac Disease
    • Parents' Corner
    • Gab/Chat Room
    • Doctors Treating Celiac Disease
    • Teenagers & Young Adults Only
    • Pregnancy
    • Friends and Loved Ones of Celiacs
    • Meeting Room
    • Celiac Disease & Sleep
    • Celiac Support Groups
  • Gluten-Free Lifestyle
    • Gluten-Free Foods, Products, Shopping & Medications
    • Gluten-Free Recipes & Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Restaurants
    • Ingredients & Food Labeling Issues
    • Publications & Publicity
    • Traveling with Celiac Disease
    • Weight Issues & Celiac Disease
    • International Room (Outside USA)
    • Sports and Fitness
  • When A Gluten-Free Diet Just Isn't Enough
    • Food Intolerance & Leaky Gut
    • Super Sensitive People
    • Alternative Diets
  • Forum Technical Assistance
    • Board/Forum Technical Help
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Events
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Groups/Organizations in the DFW area

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Celiac.com Sponsors
  • Celiac Disease
  • Safe Gluten-Free Food List / Unsafe Foods & Ingredients
  • Gluten-Free Food & Product Reviews
  • Gluten-Free Recipes
    • American & International Foods
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Biscuits, Rolls & Buns
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Noodles & Dumplings
    • Gluten-Free Dessert Recipes: Pastries, Cakes, Cookies, etc.
    • Gluten-Free Bread Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Flour Mixes
    • Gluten-Free Kids Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Snacks & Appetizers
    • Gluten-Free Muffin Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pancake Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pizza Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Soups, Sauces, Dressings & Chowders
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Scone Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Waffle Recipes
  • Celiac Disease Diagnosis, Testing & Treatment
  • Miscellaneous Information on Celiac Disease
    • Additional Celiac Disease Concerns
    • Celiac Disease Research Projects, Fundraising, Epidemiology, Etc.
    • Conferences, Publicity, Pregnancy, Church, Bread Machines, Distillation & Beer
    • Gluten-Free Diet, Celiac Disease & Codex Alimentarius Wheat Starch
    • Gluten-Free Food Ingredient Labeling Regulations
    • Celiac.com Podcast Edition
  • Celiac Disease & Gluten Intolerance Research
  • Celiac Disease & Related Diseases and Disorders
    • Lists of Diseases and Disorders Associated with Celiac Disease
    • Addison's Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Anemia and Celiac Disease
    • Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia and Celiac Disease
    • Arthritis and Celiac Disease
    • Asthma and Celiac Disease
    • Ataxia, Nerve Disease, Neuropathy, Brain Damage and Celiac Disease
    • Attention Deficit Disorder and Celiac Disease
    • Autism and Celiac Disease
    • Bacterial Overgrowth and Celiac Disease
    • Cancer, Lymphoma and Celiac Disease
    • Candida Albicans and Celiac Disease
    • Canker Sores (Aphthous Stomatitis) & Celiac Disease
    • Casein / Cows Milk Intolerance and Celiac Disease
    • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Cognitive Impairment and Celiac Disease
    • Crohn's Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Depression and Celiac Disease
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis: Skin Condition Associated with Celiac Disease
    • Diabetes and Celiac Disease
    • Down Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Dyspepsia, Acid Reflux and Celiac Disease
    • Epilepsy and Celiac Disease
    • Eye Problems, Cataract and Celiac Disease
    • Fertility, Pregnancy, Miscarriage and Celiac Disease
    • Fibromyalgia and Celiac Disease
    • Flatulence (Gas) and Celiac Disease
    • Gall Bladder Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Celiac Disease
    • Geographic Tongue (Glossitis) and Celiac Disease
    • Growth Hormone Deficiency and Celiac Disease
    • Heart Failure and Celiac Disease
    • Infertility, Impotency and Celiac Disease
    • Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Intestinal Permeability and Celiac Disease
    • Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Kidney Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Liver Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Lupus and Celiac Disease
    • Malnutrition, Body Mass Index and Celiac Disease
    • Migraine Headaches and Celiac Disease
    • Multiple Sclerosis and Celiac Disease
    • Myasthenia Gravis Celiac Disease
    • Obesity, Overweight & Celiac Disease
    • Osteoporosis, Osteomalacia, Bone Density and Celiac Disease
    • Psoriasis and Celiac Disease
    • Refractory Celiac Disease & Collagenous Sprue
    • Sarcoidosis and Celiac Disease
    • Scleroderma and Celiac Disease
    • Schizophrenia / Mental Problems and Celiac Disease
    • Sepsis and Celiac Disease
    • Sjogrens Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Skin Problems and Celiac Disease
    • Sleep Disorders and Celiac Disease
    • Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Celiac Disease
    • Thyroid & Pancreatic Disorders and Celiac Disease
    • Tuberculosis and Celiac Disease
  • The Origins of Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Grains and Flours
  • Oats and Celiac Disease: Are They Gluten-Free?
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2018 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2018 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2018 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2018 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2017 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2017 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2017 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2017 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2016 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2016 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2016 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2016 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2015 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2015 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2015 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2015 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2014 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2014 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2014 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2014 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2013 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2013 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2013 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2013 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2012 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2012 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2012 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2012 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2011 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2011 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2006 Issue
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2005 Issue
  • Celiac Disease Support Groups
    • United States of America: Celiac Disease Support Groups and Organizations
    • Outside the USA: Celiac Disease Support Groups and Contacts
  • Celiac Disease Doctor Listing
  • Kids and Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Travel
  • Gluten-Free Cooking
  • Gluten-Free
  • Allergy vs. Intolerance
  • Tax Deductions for Gluten-Free Food
  • Gluten-Free Newsletters & Magazines
  • Gluten-Free & Celiac Disease Links
  • History of Celiac.com
    • History of Celiac.com Updates Through October 2007
    • Your E-mail in Support of Celiac.com 1996 to 2006

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Interests


Location

Found 6 results

  1. Celiac.com 01/14/2019 - There are a number of new drugs in development that are designed to treat celiac disease. In addition to a possible vaccine, those drugs include enzymes and other drugs that are designed to reduce or eliminate the body’s adverse reaction to gluten through various mechanisms. Here's a 2019 status update for every drug for treating celiac disease currently in development: ALV003—Created by Alvine Pharmaceuticals, is a combination of two enzymes that break down gluten before it can provoke an immune reaction. The drug is a powder to be dissolved in water and taken before meals. ALV003 passed a phase 2 clinical trial, and results were published in the June 2014 issue of Gastroenterology. Post-trial biopsies showed that ALV003 prevented intestinal damage in 34 volunteers with celiac disease, each of whom ate 2 grams of gluten per day for six weeks, in addition to taking ALV-003. Phase 2b, a 12-week trial, is now underway. AN-PEP (aspergillus niger prolyl endopeptidase)—Created by DSM Food Specialties, AN-PEP is another enzyme that degrades gluten. AN-PEP is believed to work best when taken while gluten is still in the stomach. A 2013 study showed AN-PEP to be safe, but failed to show that the enzyme had any effect, so further study is under way. That study appeared in the World Journal of Gastroenterology. In a 2018 study, AN-PEP extensively degraded gluten concentrations of up to 80,000 mg/kg in rye flour, rye sourdough, and sourdough starter under specific temperatures and pH values, while leaving the microorganisms in the sourdough starter fully intact. ActoBiotics—Created by ActoGenX uses Lactococcus lactis as an expression system to locally secrete bio-therapeutics such as cytokines, antibodies, hormones, etc. Early pre-clinical work with a genetically altered L. lactis secreting a peptide derived from gliadin demonstrated an in vivo suppression of gluten sensitization. Specifically, Huigbregtse et al. engineered L. lactis to secrete a deamidated DQ8 gliadin epitope (LL-eDQ8d) and studied the induction of Ag-specific tolerance in NOD ABo DQ8 transgenic mice [34]. Although apparently not part of the ActoGenX development program, recent work by Galipeau et al. also deserves mention in this context. The group treated gluten-sensitive mice with elafin, a serine protease inhibitor, delivered by the L. lactis vector, and found normalization of inflammation, improved permeability, and maintained ZO-1 expression. There is speculation that this is due to reduced deamidation of gliadin peptide. AVX176—Created by Avaxia Biologics, is an investigational oral antibody drug patented to provide "Antibody Therapy for Treatment of Diseases Associated with Gluten Intolerance." The patent, which expires on May 27 2029. AVX176 provides broad coverage for treating celiac disease using orally administered antibodies produced by Avaxia's proprietary platform technology. BL-7010—by BioLineRx, is a novel co-polymer for the treatment of celiac disease, which significantly reduces the immune response triggered by gluten. This drug has been shown in mice to reduce the immune system response that leads to intestinal damage and villous atrophy in celiac disease. BL-7010 actually binds to the gluten protein, reducing the protein's toxicity.The drug, with the gluten molecule attached, then passes harmlessly through the digestive system to be expelled as stool. BL-7010 has undergone safety testing in humans and was found to be well tolerated. According to BioLineRx, testing will begin in mid-2015 to see if the drug works as expected to diminish gluten's effects on the body. However, BL-7010 is designed to protect only against gluten cross-contamination; it won't allow people with celiac disease to eat large amounts of gluten. CCR9—by Chemocentryx, is a drug called vercirnon, which is also known as Traficet-EN, or CCX282B), and was originally intended for patients with moderate-to-severe Crohn's disease. CCR9 has completed one Phase 2 trial in 67 patients with celiac disease. However, despite the completion of the trial several years ago, no results relating to celiac disease have been made public or published. Egg Yolk Enzyme—Little is known about efforts to develop a celiac treatment that uses egg yolk to coat gluten and allow it to pass through the body undetected, thus preventing an adverse gluten reaction in sensitive individuals. Like most other drugs being developed, this treatment would work to prevent reactions to small amounts of gluten, rather than as a cure for celiac disease. Recent news shows that the egg yolk enzyme is safe for humans. GliadinX (Aspergillus niger)—GliadinX is a dietary supplement with the highest concentration of AN-PEP, Prolyl Endopeptidase (Aspergillus Niger), the most effective enzyme proven to break down gluten in the stomach. This high potency enzyme formulation is specifically designed to break down gliadin. GliadinX does not prevent or cure celiac disease. However, clinical research has shown that it effectively breaks down gliadin into small, harmless fragments before it can reach the small intestine. INN-202 (Larazotide Acetate)—Created by Alba Therapeutics and later acquired by Innovate Pharmaceutical, and renamed INN-202, larazotide acetate works by blocking a protein that carries pieces of gluten across the gut. Results of a phase 2 trial of larazotide acetate appear in the February 2015 edition of Gastroenterology. While INN-202 may greatly reduce the symptoms of gluten exposure in celiacs, it is unlikely that a permit consumption of unlimited amounts of gluten. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has fast-tracked the drug. Phase III clinical trials are currently underway. Results of the trial should be available soon. Nexvax2—Created by ImmusanT, Nexvax2 is touted as a vaccine, but works much like an allergy shot. Nexvax2 combines three proprietary peptides that elicit an immune response in celiac disease patients who carry the immune recognition gene HLA-DQ2. Similar to allergy shots, the vaccine is designed to reprogram gluten-specific T cells triggered by the patient's immune response to the protein. Nexvax2 exposes the immune system to gluten in a controlled way so that immune cells that are usually activated get turned off or eliminated. So far, Nexvax2 has completed a phase 1 trial showing it to be safe, and the company has begun Phase II trials on humans in Australia and New Zealand. Saliva Rothia—Researchers at the Henry M. Golden School of Dental Medicine were looking at how proteins in general break down in saliva when they discovered an enzyme in a bacterium called Rothia that pulverized gluten as if it were Pac Man. That happy accident has led to a new stream of study that has moved beyond petri dishes to study the effect of the so-called ‘subtilisin,’ or protein-ingesting enzyme on the tiny digestive systems of mice. In so doing, they have found another bacterium, B. subtilis, which produces an enzyme similar to the Rothia one and is already safely consumed in Japan in a fermented soybean dish called ‘natto.’ A 2018 Boston University report concludes that “oral Rothia bacteria to gliadin digestion and pharmaceutical modification can protect Sub-A from auto-digestion as well as from acidic insults, thus rendering the usefulness of coated subtilisins as a digestive aid for gluten degradation.” ZED1227—Created by Dr. Falk Pharma and Zedira recently announced the start of phase II clinical trials for the drug candidate ZED1227, a direct acting inhibitor of tissue transglutaminase. ZED1227 molecules work by targeting the dysregulated transglutaminase within the small intestine in order to suppress the immune response to gluten which drives the disease process. Sources: An Update on Every Celiac Disease Drug Currently in Development Inside The Race for a Celiac Disease Treatment Promising Celiac Disease Drugs in the Pipeline Development of drugs for celiac disease: review of endpoints for Phase 2 and 3 trials
  2. Celiac.com 12/31/2018 - Rates of celiac disease are about triple for patients who also suffer from cystic fibrosis, compared to those without cystic fibrosis. A team of researchers recently investigated the molecular similarities between celiac disease and cystic fibrosis. Specifically, they set out to examine the role of mutations of the gene coding for cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an anion channel pivotal for epithelial adaptation to cell‐autonomous or environmental stress. The study was led by Luigi Maiuri, Valeria Raia, and Guido Kroemer. They are variously affiliated with the San Raffaele Scientific Institute in Milan, Italy, the University of Naples Federico II in Italy, and the Paris Descartes University in France. Their research shows a connection between celiac disease and cystic fibrosis, and suggests that a compound developed for cystic fibrosis may also treat celiac disease. The results might bring us closer to a treatment for celiac disease. Failure of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in cystic fibrosis patients triggers the accumulation of mucus in the patients’ lungs and intestine. By activating the immune system, the mechanism underlying CFTR malfunction causes several reactions in the lungs and other organs. These reactions are very similar to immune responses to gluten in celiac patients. Intrigued, Maiuri, Kroemer, and their colleagues took a closer look at the molecular underpinnings of these similarities. For people with celiac disease, eating gluten triggers the immune system to attack the mucus inside the small intestine. This immune attack presents as classic celiac symptoms, such as bloating, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and upset stomach. The team's findings appear in The EMBO Journal, and point to possible new therapies and treatments for celiac disease. The most promising part of the team's data indicate that CFTR potentiators, used to treat cystic fibrosis, may also be effective in treating celiac disease. With researchers revealing new connections between celiac and numerous other diseases, it's a very exciting time for celiac research. As researchers learn more about the connection between celiac disease and cystic fibrosis, look for new treatments for celiac disease in the not too distant future. Read more at: Medicalnewstoday.com
  3. Celiac.com 06/23/2017 - Dr. Alessio Fasano from the University of Maryland's Celiac Research Center published a paper in Clinical and Developmental Immunology last month. It focused on a new drug developed by Dr. Fasano that has shown promising results in both animal and human trials. But is this the 'magic pill' that will cure celiac disease and gluten sensitivity? Let's take a look. The new drug, formerly called AT1001 but now renamed Larazotide Acetate, is a zonulin inhibitor. For those who have never heard the word 'zonulin', you might think it's a term from a science fiction movie. But zonulin is the protein that causes the 'gates' or openings between the cells making up the lining of the small intestine to open and close. These openings are called tight junctions and when zonulin gets excessive, a leaky gut ensues. Dr. Fasano has made great inroads to prove that a leaky gut is a problem that must be handled with gluten intolerance. The leaky gut perpetuates gluten's negative impact on other parts of the body. It can also initiate autoimmune disease. One key point to keep in mind is that 'leaky gut' occurs because molecules can pass between cells when they shouldn't. In addition, molecules can pass through cells which they also shouldn't. Unfortunately this new drug only impacts the former, not the latter. So, the drug Larazotide Acetate is a zonulin inhibitor. Now that we've reviewed what zonulin does as regards opening the gates, the purpose of inhibiting its action should make sense. How well does it work? In the recent human trials that were double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled (the best type of study, but I would expect no less from the stellar Dr. Fasano), a gluten exposure created a 70% increase in intestinal permeability (leaky gut) in 57% of the placebo group but only 28.6% of the patients receiving the drug (4 out of 14 patients) experienced such increased permeability. Further, gastrointestinal symptoms were significantly more frequent among patients of the placebo group as compared to the group that received the Larazotide. A pro-inflammatory substance known as interferon gamma was also evaluated. This is manufactured by the body when a specific foreign/toxic agent is recognized by the body's immune system. As expected, levels of interferon gamma increased in 4 out of 7 of the placebo patients (57%) but only 4 out of 14 larazotide patients (28.6%) saw any increase. The good news is that this drug seems well tolerated and it does reduce the leaky gut response that gluten ingestion normally creates. Further, it also reduces the percentage, by about half, of the production of interferon gamma. These are all excellent results. But, and it's unfortunately a very big 'but', we have a very long way to go before such a drug would be useful for your typical celiac or gluten sensitive patient. Will Dr. Fasano and his team be able to tweak this drug such that it functions at a higher level of efficacy? I certainly hope so, but let's analyze exactly what this drug does in its present state: The drug still resulted in almost 30% of the patients experiencing a 70% increase in permeability (leaky gut) – Not good. A highly pro-inflammatory (this means that it creates degenerative disease) substance known as interferon gamma was also produced in nearly 30% of the drug-consuming patients tested – Not good. Leakiness, or the passage of negative substances through cells is not affected by this drug – Not good. Of course on the plus side, over 70% of those tested DID have a very good result with apparently no untoward side effects – Very good. At what point is the efficacy high enough that you'd be willing to subject yourself to a possible reaction? Do realize that any gluten ingested increases your chance of disease, chief amongst them cancer and autoimmune disease. Is there a level of function of the drug that you would chance taking it? Is it 90%, 99%? Does any drug ever get that good? Well, as a big fan of Dr. Fasano's, I would say that if anyone can do it, he and his team can. But at the same time, I cannot help but think of all the other drugs I have encountered. As 'wonderful' as they sometimes seem initially, they almost always fall from grace when some horrible side effect is realized. Would I guinea pig my own health that I've fought so hard to regain? Would I recommend taking such a chance to my children just so that they could consume some white flour product? I don't think so. How about you? What do you think? If the drug were available right now at its efficacy of 71%, would you take it and hope you weren't in the 29% for whom it didn't work? I'd love to hear your thoughts. If you are wondering if you're gluten intolerant or know that you are but still aren't enjoying good health, consider calling us for a free health analysis: 408-733-0400. We are here to help! Our destination clinic sees patients from across the country and internationally so you do not need to live locally to receive assistance. To your good health! Reference: Alessio Fasano, Clinical and Developmental Immunology, Published online 2012 October 10. "Novel Therapeutic/Integrative Approaches for Celiac Disease and Dermatitis Herpetiformis."
  4. Celiac.com 08/25/2017 - Japanese drug maker Daiichi Sankyo will pay $300 million to settle thousands of federal and state court lawsuits over its top-selling blood pressure drugs, Benicar, Benicar HCT, Azor and Tribenzor, according to the lead Plaintiffs' lawyers. The settlement was reached in the federal multi-district litigation (MDL) case titled In re: Benicar (Olmesartan) Products Liability Litigation, MDL 2606, pending in the U.S. District Court for the District of New Jersey, Camden Division. Overseeing the federal MDL litigation are the Honorable Judge Robert Kugler and the Honorable Magistrate Judge Joel Schneider, who handled the settlement negotiations. The agreement covers about 2,500 claims by individuals who claim severe and sometimes life-threatening gastrointestinal injuries after using medications containing the active ingredient olmesartan medoxomil (Benicar, Benicar HCT, Azor and Tribenzor). Numerous reports have tied Olmesartan to sprue-like enteropathy and changes in the intestinal tract that mimic those seen in celiac disease, and inhibit a person's ability to absorb nutrients. The parties reached the resolution as they maneuvered ahead of pre-trial hearings, and an expected trial in federal court. Christopher L. Coffin and Adam M. Slater, Co-Lead Counsel for the Plaintiffs, praised the settlement as an excellent outcome for the Plaintiffs. In a statement, Coffin said that they were "very pleased with the outcome of this hard-fought litigation. This is a gratifying resolution for thousands of patients who suffered severe gastrointestinal injuries while using these blood pressure medications." Under the settlement, former olmesartan users who have claims, and who meet certain criteria will be eligible for compensation. For more information go to OlmesartanProductLitigationSettlement.com.
  5. Celiac.com 04/27/2017 - Celiac disease is associated with numerous chronic conditions, such as anemia and malabsorption of some critical vitamins. Changes in the gastrointestinal tract, rates of gastric emptying, and gastric pH are responsible for impaired vitamin and mineral absorption. Intestinal CYP3A4 levels may also be disrupted, which may have implications in first-pass metabolism for some drugs that are substrates for this drug metabolizing enzyme. This has led some researcher to investigate the potential impact of celiac disease on drug absorption. This would be of interest to pharmacists, since altered drug absorption can have pharmacokinetic consequences, along with the potential to impact overall drug therapy. A comprehensive review on this topic was published in 2013 by Tran et al. Another review was published in 2014. The review by Tran, et al., considered absorption studies in subjects with celiac disease, and the authors focused on a handful of drugs, including acetaminophen, aspirin, propranolol, levothyroxine, methyldopa, and some antibiotics. They reported that some reports show an altered gastrointestinal environment and sharp differences between drug absorption in patients with celiac disease, while other reports showed no absorption differences between those with and without the disease. The authors concluded that the drugs could potentially alter absorption in celiac patients, and that healthcare professionals should bear that in mind when starting drug therapy. The 2014 review of the potential impact of celiac disease on cardiovascular drug absorption considered many of the same medications previously explored by Tran et al, with a focus on cardiovascular agents. The authors warned that numerous cardiovascular drugs may alter absorption in celiac disease, but noted few published studies with strong, comprehensive data. The authors also stressed the need for more studies on celiac patients, as well as caution when initiating cardiovascular drug treatments. Available research indicates that patients with celiac disease can have altered absorption of many different drugs. Unfortunately, there still isn't much good data on altered drug absorption and disposition in celiac patients. More study will likely help illuminate the influence of celiac disease on drug disposition. The early evidence suggests that celiac disease may alter drug absorption, but studies don't yet tell us how much, or how often. The team is recommending that doctors and pharmacists consider possible absorption issues when prescribing drug treatments for people with celiac disease, and that they review the available literature on specific drugs, when possible. They also recommend increased monitoring for efficacy and adverse effects when beginning a new drug treatment regimen for celiac patients. Source: Pharmacy Times
×