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Found 16 results

  1. Lindsay Cochrane

    Living with Celiac Disease in South Korea

    Celiac.com 09/21/2018 - The English as a Second Language (ESL) pie is so large in countries such as South Korea that there seem to be enough helpings for anyone interested. However, these generous slices may be off limits to individuals with severe food allergies or intolerances, including those with celiac disease. If you have diet restrictions and are thinking of heading to South Korea or another Asian country, the following information will help you decide whether or not this move is a good idea. One might think that Asia, the land of rice-based meals, would be a celiac’s paradise. As one naïve dietician told me before I moved to Seoul, “You couldn’t be going to a better place.” This assumption could not be further from the truth. If cooked with traditional ingredients, many local dishes are gluten-free. However, in Korea, wheat flour is now cheaper than other kinds of flour, despite the fact that it has to be imported. Wheat flour and barley are currently the two most common ingredients in Korean food products. In Korea, eleven major food allergens must be included on product labels: poultry eggs, milk, buckwheat, peanuts, soybean, wheat, mackerel, crab, pork, peaches, and tomatoes. As for anything else, the Korean Food and Drug Administration states that only the five major ingredients in a product have to be labeled. Furthermore, a label need only include intentional ingredients, not things accidentally mixed into a product through cross-contamination. So you can say goodbye to warnings like: “this product may contain traces of peanuts.” Stricter labeling regulations will be put into effect in September 2006. However, these laws will remain less stringent than those in North America and Europe. According to a source at the KFDA, labeling restrictions are similar in Japan and more lax in China and South East Asia. One can easily learn Korean for “I’m allergic to ____” in any phrasebook or from a Korean coworker, friend, or even the guy in the next seat on your Korean Air flight. Yet it is the cultural barrier, not the language barrier, which poses the most difficulties for a celiac. Korean culture revolves around the sharing of food due to food shortages during the Japanese occupation; Koreans do not ask, “How are you?” but, “Have you had your meal?” Co-workers, friends, and even the occasional stranger will offer to share food. The politest way to refuse is by saying, “Thank you, but I can’t. I’m allergic.” Also, rather than saying you are allergic to something in Korean—allerugi—it is much more effective to say you cannot have it. (see the list of useful phrases). Unfortunately, even these statements are unlikely to be fully effective when eating Korean food. Many Koreans are completely unaware that frequently-used ingredients such as tashida soup flavouring and soybean powder contain wheat. Most Koreans I spoke with were shocked to hear that, as a celiac, I could not eat food which had so much as touched gluten. Generally, they assume that people with food allergies are still able to consume a product with a 1-2% trace of the allergen. Food allergies, celiac disease, vegetarianism, and other kinds of diet restrictions are rare in this country and are not taken very seriously. Furthermore, according to gastroenterologist Dr. Kim of Severance Hospital in Seoul, only two people were ever diagnosed with celiac disease in Korea. The world of North American restaurants, where servers cater to those with food allergies, food sensitivities, and plain old picky eaters, is very far away. Koreans generally order what is on the menu without making any special requests. Even Westerners who learn enough of the Korean language to explain their diets often end up being served something they asked specifically not to have. Furthermore, Korean food is not served on personal plates: everyone at the table reaches his or her chopsticks into the various communal dishes, causing cross-contamination. I was at a restaurant with some Korean friends and was trying to explain my gluten-intolerance to them, when one young man told me he was so sensitive to peaches that he could not so much as touch a peach without breaking out into a rash. Five minutes later I saw him eat a dish containing peach slices. This is the attitude of Koreans to food allergies—both theirs and yours. The gluten-free meal which is safest and easiest to find in Korea is samgyupsal. This dish features fatty, thick slices of pork cooked over a clean grill right at your table. Just make sure that all sauces are kept off the grill. Bibimbop is a rice, vegetable, and egg dish usually served with kochujang, a red pepper paste which unfortunately contains wheat. Bibimbop can be ordered, however, with the kochujang on the side. Most foreigners are in Korea to work rather than visit, and having an apartment provides the extra advantage of having one’s own cooking space. There are a few of us who have managed the gluten-free diet in Korea. However, it has not been easy. If you have celiac disease or food allergies and are thinking of moving to this part of the world, I can guarantee you that it will be a monumental challenge. Useful Korean phrases: Thank you, but I can’t. I’m allergic: kamsa hamnida man, allerugi issoyo. I cannot have barley, rye, or wheat: chonun pori hago homil hago mil motmuhgeyo. Barley: pori Wheat: mil Rye: homil Bibimbop with the red pepper paste on the side: bibimbop kochujang garu Grilled Pork: samgyupsal
  2. gardengirl77

    Chick-fil-A Chips!!!

    Chick-fil-A now has Waffle potato chips!! I saw them when I went in there a few minutes ago and wanted to share this news with y’all. The best part is they are gluten free and come in individual bags. I can’t wait to try them.
  3. Charmin has released an important new tool for celiac sufferers, the SitorSquat bathroom finder. No more running in circles or trying every door in the building in a desperate rush. Now you can know right where to go. Get it today for Android phones. https://www.charmin.com/en-us/about-us/sitorsquat?gclid=CjwKCAjw-qbLBRB7EiwAftBCI6Zc52q7S3svyfGqqz1jn9zx1cToCh1ZqQunMt6x29WlD10w2j9ALxoCEDsQAvD_BwE A clean nearby public bathroom can be hard to find. But not all restrooms are created equal. With SitOrSquat we put clean public toilets on the map. Literally. Clean locations have a green “Sit” rating. Less desirable ones have a red “Squat." You can even rate and review a bathroom, and share your experiences to help others. So, the next time nature calls and you need to find a nearby restroom, SitORSquat will help you know where to go.
  4. Hello guys this is my first post forgive the long post but my situation is complicated. I just got out of bed as I had to cause of Night Sweats, I hate them, I did go with my wife and kids to the centre of town (London) to see a chinese TCM doc and so we went to China town to a restaurant, its been cold also and the stress of the kids having tantrums I think sent me overboard. I must say though for 3 nights have had terrible night sweats BUT the previous 3 days I ate wheat and dairy which I usually avoid, I had ricotta cheese and Italian wheat bread, gluten free lasagna but has cheese/ and my wife made chinese food with soy sauce, chinese restaurant food. My symptoms are sneezing, roof of the mouth hurts and when I sneeze its as if Ive just torn a layer of skin or something from the roof of the mouth, night sweats, mucus in the mornings. I suppose the stress I have in my life doesnt help, Im lowering my medication (Paxil) and hope to reduce and stop Prilosec also as I believe it maybe the reason I have a damaged intestine or leaky gut seeing as chronic low stomach acid could allow bad bacteria to migrate from the stomach to the duodenum etc, low stomach acid food arriving in the duodenum doesnt have the acid trigger that you need to send a message to the pancreas to digest the food and so partially digested food feeds the bad bacteria, right? I also did coffee enemas for 9yrs daily an this may have damaged my duodenum/small intestine cause bile is released each time and bile is slightly corrosive? I stopped doing them now but not sure which diet to follow, Ive heard of FODMAPs diet, SCD (Specific Carbohydrate Diet), Mcdoughall high starch low fat/oil diet, Keto, low carb, Mediterranean. Im confused which diet to follow cause I have a few issues, fatty liver, gallbladder polyps, GERD/Hiatal Hernia, depression/Anxiety all diagnosed but the leaky gut, or Gluten intolerance hasn't been diagnosed, maybe I should get an allaergy test, I think I'll test positive even for water at least it seems this way, that my body is becoming intolerant to many foods and the list seems like its growing. I wasn't gluten intolerant from birth, this is what the Chinese doc said to me yesterday, she said I doubt if your Gluten problem started 4 yrs ago, usually people have it from birth, i thought what is she talking about, I', Italian and I ate mamas lasagna, spaghetti, bolognese, minestrone etc as Italians we ate a paste based meal everyday and this was for decades I ate wheat, I ate bread as well and processed foods, surely I would have known sooner and reacted sooner? I started reacting 4 yrs ago and intially was going nuts cause I thought I had dust allergy and thought |I was allergic to my home, to mold, insects, the air, I just didnt make the food connection, until I read about Gluten, then i started to avoid Gluten and started to eat Gluten free bread (took some getting used to), finally after 3 to 4 yrs some relief, now I cannot eat Gluten and even Dairy, sometimes I find sugar/stress and potato skins gives me auto immune problem symptoms like red hot ear (Relapsing polychondritis?) This is just my intro I have written a longer letter to give to a doc, but not sure which doc could help me, I will send it in a few minutes once Ive finished it, the chinese doc I saw says we cannot shrink the polyp and is too expensive with her herbs but will try for a few weeks to see if I feel better, the reason why I like the chinese approach is that they treat you whole-istically cause I have too many things going on for a one size fits all approach, one remedy or diet may harm or worsen another problem that I have. Thankyou guys for reading any help or advice will be much appreciated, thanks. Gerald
  5. Hey guys! I’m a graphic design junior, and we are in the first semester of our capstone. My mom was diagnosed with celiac, so I’m really passionate about helping make the post diagnosis life a little easier. I’m not sure what specific problem within celiac disease to tackle. I have found it helpful to talk to those with celiac about what they find most frustrating or challenging. If anyone has any suggestions on what is most frustrating or what you wished you had to help, it would be much much appreciated!
  6. Hello, I used to love risotto in restaurants before my diagnosis. Do you know if it is definite that any risotto is gluten free? I am afraid they might have cream that is not gluten-free.
  7. gardengirl77

    Birmingham, Al

    I am traveling to the Birmingham area soon. Anyone have suggestions for some good restaurants? I am more interested in local (not chains), but will consider anything. Thanks.
  8. I'm so frustrated and just need to vent! Sigh...sigh... I just want to be a normal person again...be able to go out to eat without feeling scared or getting sick. I've eaten out 3 times since my diagnosis. The first time was Red Robin were I got glutened and I was sick for a week. Ugh! Then looked into restaurants that are good for celiacs and decided to try Chipotle. It was great. The person washed their hands, changed gloves and spoons and one person took my meal through the whole thing. I went super simple. Rice, beans, chicken and pico. Didn't get sick...so happy. I did worry the whole time...but it was all good. Last night I decided to try Outback...also on the list of good restaurants. They had a gluten free menu, the waiter was great, the chef's wife has celiac....should be good, right? I went simple again. I ordered a steak, grilled asparagus and a baked sweet potato. Started feeling bad last night. The first thing that happened is my rib pain on the left side came back, then nausea, GI issues, pain, fuzzy head, headache. I'm so frustrated and sad! Sad because the meal wasn't great and was absolutely not worth being glutened for. Frustrated because I want to be able to enjoy this kind of stuff in my life. So now, I'm sitting here, not feeling good, sipping ginger tea and hoping I will be able to get through the day including my son's first soccer game of the season this evening. Anyone else feel the same? Thanks for letting me vent...
  9. I understand that there are quite a few restaurants that have gluten free menus. My question is, do most of these restaurants prepare the gluten free items to where they will not be cross contaminated? Applebees, Chilis, Red Robin: these are just a few of the places that I know have gluten free menus. Any ideas?
  10. So it begins, learning how to eat out. So the other day I went to this local Mexican restaurant that I LOVE. So I, before becoming a Celiac, always got a platter of a shredded Beef Burrito, Mexican rice, re-fried beans, and, of course, chips and salsa. I went their last night and had a talk with the server asking her to talk to the cook to see if their was any flour in the re-fried bean, rice, or the shredded beef in the burrito (I was planning on just getting the innards and not the tortilla). She became really hostile to me, like I was trying to find out their recipes or something and trying to change they way they cooked o.o . I explained to her that I could not have Wheat etc... that, for my safety, I was inquiring about a specific ingredient not all of them. Basically got to where I did not trust that she would make a point of asking so I requested to be served by someone else. The new server was very understanding (she told me how her child has a peanut allergy). So I found out that I just had to skip the Mexican rice, but got some creative rice w/other spices in it that the cook dished up . My main point is how do people deal with this? People who know someone with an allergy tend to be more understanding( I have concluded this because I also have 10 other food allergies, though easier to avoid), but why can't other people get it? I just don't want to have a waiter/server not check or etc...when its very important. I guess the run in just kinda shocked me. Has anyone else had similar experiences, or was my server a rarity ? Thanks!
  11. I was diagnosed with Celiac two weeks ago and have been following the diet without a problem. Last night I went out with a small group for a friend's birthday and ordered what I thought was a perfectly gluten-free meal, but after eating it was like I had the flu and was sicker than I had ever been before going gluten-free... Here's what I ate: Salad (romaine lettuce and dressing*) Steak (no seasoning, in a tomato sauce* with provolone cheese) Vegetables (steamed and served in butter with no seasoning) * = the chef said these were gluten-free items Before ordering I spoke with the waiter/manager about my condition and they seemed very knowledgeable about celiac and my needs. The restaurant was empty (I hear that's the best time for a celiac to eat out). My food was prepared separately and in a clean area with new utensils (I do not know this for sure, but that's what I was told).... Am I missing something?
  12. Hi everyone! This is my first new post so I'll give a little history - I have been gluten free for about 3 months now. It has completely changed my life! I had really bad panic attacks & stomach pains before and now I don't have them at all! (Well, unless I get accidentally glutened.) I'm relatively new to this so I haven't gone out to eat very much. I'm going on a cruise to Bermuda in August and I'm really nervous! I know that the cruise line knows of my diet but I'm scared about being accidentally glutened. Also I'm going with my extended family (ALL of which don't understand ANYTHING about gluten intolerance at all) and I know they all want to eat out at least once in Bermuda. I have done some research and have emailed different restaurants but I usually get one word answers which doesn't help me much. Does anyone have any tips for me about being gluten free and traveling? Or even eating out while I'm in Bermuda.
  13. GlutenStinks15

    Texas De Brazil

    I don't know if any of you have a Texas de Brazil near you. It's a Brazilian steakhouse that opened recently near me. I called them to find out if I could safely eat there. The girl on the phone didn't bat an eye and said, yes, I'll put a note on your reservation that says Celiac, and the chef will come out and explain everything to you and tell you what you can and can't have. I almost fell on the floor LOL. I am going Saturday so I will let you know how it was. I read some reviews on UrbanSpoon.com about them that said they are great. So, fingers crossed...
  14. grodeylocks

    Discrimination

    Has anyone here ever been discriminated against for being gluten free. I feel as though everywhere I go whenever I mention my problem I sometimes get the rolling eyes in the back of the head treatment. I was even recently denied being able to bring in my own food to an event at an A's baseball game. Is this even legal? I am just disgusted and to the point where if someone says the wrong thing to me again and associates my disease with being a wimp it's going to take a lot not to deck them out.
  15. I was diagnosed in september and took until february to feel 100% again. I was never so strict about a diet during this time, at almost all my meals at home and only at at restaurnts with a dedicated gluten-free menu, made it difficult sometimes going out with freinds and while my fiance has been supportive a main point of contention between us is that I am too high strung over this whole thing. For example he thinks if you read a label and all the ingreidents are gluten-free but the label doesn't say it, still ok to eat. At restaurants just let them you have it and just trust whatever comes at me. Recently we went away and we stayed at all inclusive hotel and i just ate at the buffett: salads, rice and whatever looked ok to me. I was fine while I was there but when I got home, my stomach was such a mess. The other thing that I did for the first time there was have vodka after reading a lot of articles saying it should technically be ok since its distilled. Like i said I dont seem to react to gluten immediately it seems like it is days later that i get sick so it feels impossible to back track and figure out exactly what went wrong. I know I got a little too adventurous with a few different things at the same time (just wanted to be normal for 1 week out of my life!) but I was hoping for some help: 1) Do I always have to be so neurotic with labels, and only have it if they label it gluten-free? 2) whats the rule with natural flavors? i dont know what that means! is it ok or not? Same with food coloring. 3) I am really not that big of a drinker I actually just prefer a glass of wining if anything at all but if i do go out with my friends or at a wedding or just want a drink, what am i allowed to have? Was it a huge mistake to have vodka? 4) How strict do i need to be at restaurants? Can I have fish if I just ask for it with lemon on the grill? Or should I just not eat at the restaurants that have waiters that stare at me like I have two heads when I say I have gluten allergy? Sorry I know this is a lot. I am just feeling overwhelmed right now. Trying so hard to find a balance. Thanks for any advice! really appreciated! -michelle
  16. pianoland

    Nyc Dining

    NYC is a great place to visit without worrying about eating safely. My latest successes: -Heartland Brewery (Midtown West location only) Waiter assured me they prep in a separate location with separate mixing bowls, utensils, etc. http://www.heartlandbrewery.com/ -5 Napkin Burger Gluten free buns and separate frier. I've been there 3 or 4 times, no reaction any of the times. http://5napkinburger.com/ In the past I've also had good luck at -Bistango -Nizza's I walked past Risotteria but I'm dying to go there next time I'm in the city! Feel free to add to this list.
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