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Found 20 results

  1. Hi all, I was diagnosed with both Celiac and Microscopic Colitis (Callogenous) last year, and while I'm feeling largely better, I've never been able to find a succinct and ready-to-go guide for people with MC and Celiac, and am having an especially hard time finding one that is friendly for vegetarians. Any advice, links, or reads that anyone might have would be greatly appreciated!
  2. Celiac.com 06/07/2016 - The world of nutrition is currently obsessed with "super foods". Super foods are loosely defined as foods that are extremely high in nutrients – particularly antioxidants and vitamins – and which everyone is heartily advised to add to their diet. The problem with this approach is that, while focused firmly on nutrients, we are ignoring anti-nutrients! According to Wikipedia, an anti-nutrient is a compound in food that interferes with your absorption of other nutrients from a food. Most foods have varying amounts of anti-nutrients, toxins and other problematic compounds. A truly healthy diet will include weighing the good against the bad, while maintaining as much variety as possible. Once we have a clearer picture of how a food helps to support our nutrition, we can then decide how to include it in our diet and in what amount. Obviously, certain health conditions mean that certain foods are no longer healthful. For those with celiac disease, this means that grains with gluten in them are damaging to their health. It really doesn't matter how healthy wheat bran is for some – for celiacs, wheat bran is harmful. For those with allergies, you have a similar issue. Foods that may be healthy for some may not be for others. Another issue with food and health can be related to anti-nutrients. For instance, in the vegetarian world, we now hear more about phytate – often found in legumes – and how to reduce it in a plant-based diet. Salicylate is another anti-nutrient found in plant foods, and more people are finding that they need to consider this when choosing foods. Plants may also contain toxins, which are totally natural to the plant, but not good for you. Wikipedia indicates that a toxin is a substance that is directly poisonous, and capable of causing disease. For instance, some foods may contain naturally occurring cyanide compounds, or even arsenic in various forms. While we may not get enough to cause immediate problems, we certainly don't want to consume a lot of these toxins! Oxalate is another toxin present in many otherwise healthy foods. Oxalate poses many challenges for human health. It's a free radical. It promotes inflammation in your body. Because of its biochemistry, oxalate can be stored throughout your body, and can be particularly concentrated at the sites of previous injury, inflammation or surgery. Fundamentally, oxalate can be stored in tissues wherever the cells have taken it up. As a result, if you are someone who is absorbing too much oxalate from your diet, you can be contributing substantial stress to your body. Reducing the amount of oxalate in your diet cannot hurt you – you are reducing a totally non-nutritive substance for which the human body has no need and which contributes directly to health issues. However, reducing too many food types or nutrients in your diet can have negative impacts. The greater the variety in your diet, the better the chance that you are getting all your needed nutrients. The good news is that you can have a nutritious, high variety diet, and retain "super foods" in your diet which are high nutrition, gluten-free and low oxalate. Get Your Fiber The preponderance of processed foods in our diets can often leave us with hardly any fiber in our diet! Many gluten-free options are very low in fiber, and this can affect gut health. Fiber is not a direct nutrient for us per se – but it is a needed component that contributes to better gut flora and better health overall. Insoluble fiber adds bulk to the stool and promotes regularity. Most of us are not getting enough of this fiber, and as a result, can develop poor motility and constipation. Given that many whole grains are not good alternatives for those on a gluten-free diet, and the bran of many grains are actually high in oxalate, how can we get more healthy insoluble fiber? The good news is that one nutritional powerhouse is not only full of healthy insoluble fiber – it's also a plant source of Omega 3's. So a great solution to lack of insoluble fiber is flax seeds. Flax seeds can be eaten whole – but to really get the best benefits from this super food, it's best to grind your flax. Keep whole flax seeds in the freezer to preserve their freshness, and don't grind until just before using them. The recommended daily serving (which will also provide some soluble fiber) is two tablespoons. According to the Mayo Clinic, the right fiber goes much further than just regularity. If you increase soluble fiber, it can help reduce both blood sugar and cholesterol. Soluble fiber creates a gel-like material in the gut, and some research indicates that it may help to feed our gut bacteria. The benefits of soluble fiber are well known when it comes to cholesterol. The recommended food to get more soluble fiber is oats. However, whole oats are high in oxalate, and the oat bran has confusing test data. The solution? Psyllium! Pysllium is the medicinal ingredient in the popular product, Metamucil. Psyllium contains both soluble and insoluble fiber – and research on it shows that it can help to reduce cholesterol as well as normalize blood sugar. You can add it to baked products (but adjust the liquids), or sprinkle on foods. It's virtually tasteless – although you might find it does add some thickness or texture to liquids or foods. Fruits and vegetables are also good sources of both soluble and insoluble fiber and many are lower oxalate. Cabbages, lettuces, onions, cucumbers (with the skin) red bell peppers, orange, mango and grapes are all good low oxalate sources of fiber in your diet. Fruits There is no shortage of healthy options in fresh fruits that are also low oxalate, but the blueberry holds a special place among even the healthiest fruits. Research shows that blueberries are one of the most antioxidant rich foods available, and are included in most lists of super foods. Blueberries are one of the highest rated foods on the ORAC scale. The ORAC scale was developed by researchers at Tufts University, and is the measure of Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (hence the abbreviation ORAC). What this really means for you is that the higher something ranks on the ORAC scale, the more antioxidants you are getting. Blueberries are stars on this scale, with an ORAC value of 4,669 per 100 grams, according to Superfoodly.com. Wild blueberries rank higher than cultivated ones – but you can't go wrong with any blueberry. Another fruit that ranks very high in ORAC is the lowly cranberry. While very tart (and difficult to eat raw), cranberries are second only to blueberries in antioxidant levels. To reduce the acidity of the fruit, and make them more palatable, cook with water and some honey. Cranberries are very easy to cook and make a lovely side dish for fattier meats like lamb. They aren't just for turkey anymore! Consuming these tangy fruits also help to contribute to bladder health. For nutrition on the go, turn to golden seedless raisins. While dark raisins are tasty treats, the golden seedless variety is both lower in oxalate and higher in antioxidants. In fact, golden seedless raisins actually have a higher ORAC score than fresh blueberries! Combine that with convenience and portability, and you have an easy way to get more antioxidants in your day. Raisins also make a great treat for kids, because of their sweetness. Is the apple a super food? Yes it is! Easy to purchase and pack for lunch, this popular fruit is full of quercetin, which protects cells from damage and is often recommended for those with allergies. Not only is it full of healthy antioxidants, it also has twice the fiber of other commonly eaten fruits, including peaches, grapes and grapefruit, according to the site EverydayHealth.com. Veggies When looking at veggies, many of the foods that are considered most healthy are also very high in oxalate. Everyone talks today about how healthy the sweet potato is for us: but did you know that a ½ cup of sweet potato can have over 90 mg of oxalate in it? For people trying to eat a low oxalate diet, a single serving would be more oxalate than they should consume in a whole day! However, while avoiding high oxalate foods, you do need to eat color and variety to get your needed nutrition. If you want a lower carbohydrate, orange veggie – consider the kabocha squash. Not only does this lower carb, low oxalate veggie work as a substitute for many recipes that require sweet potato, it also has a very good nutrient profile. Self Nutrition Data lists Vitamin A and Vitamin C as well as a good serving of Folate, in addition to good amounts of calcium, magnesium, phosphorus and potassium. Of course, you want other colors in your veggies as well – and green leafy veggies are particularly known for their nutrition. While spinach would be a bad choice because of extremely high oxalate, you have lots of other greens to choose from. Focus on lower oxalate varieties of kale, including purple kale. The website, The World's Healthiest Foods, lists kale as a food that can lower cholesterol (if steamed) as well as lower your risk of cancer. Of course, kale is part of the cruciferous vegetable family, and these foods have many anti-cancer benefits. Kale is an excellent source of Vitamin K (your blood clotting factor), as well as vitamin A, vitamin C, manganese, copper, B6 and others. Don't forget your other brassicas while you are focusing on kale! The cruciferous veggies also support our bodies natural detox processes, which is very valuable in today's world where we are exposed to many environmental toxins. Broccoli is another low oxalate brassica that is good for you, whether you are eating the mature broccoli heads, or feasting on broccoli sprouts. Note that broccoli sprouts do have an edge over their more mature cousins – they might just taste better, and given that they can be added to a sandwich for some satisfying crunch, might be easier to work into your daily diet. Research gives the sprouts a further edge in cancer risk reduction and some research indicates they may actually help to prevent stomach cancer. Another excellent leafy green is the lowly turnip green. Turnip greens are very high in calcium, and are even lower in oxalate than kale. A cup of cooked turnip greens will also get you more than 100% of the RDA for vitamin K. In addition, you'll get vitamin A, vitamin C, folate, copper, manganese, calcium, and vitamin E. Each serving will give you 15% of your daily requirement for B6. When thinking of deep red veggies, go for red cabbage. This versatile veggie is very low in oxalate, and that lovely red color means that it has even more protective phytonutrients, according to World's Healthiest Foods, than its green sibling! One serving of red cabbage delivers more than four times the polyphenols of green cabbage. Fats and Oils You can't read on super food nutrition anywhere and not run into the avocado. A great source of healthy monounsaturated fat, the avocado has also been linked to reduced risk of cancer, as well as lowered risk of heart disease and diabetes. While we think of avocados as a fatty food, they are actually a good source of fiber, with 11 to 17 grams of fiber per fruit! You'll also get a dose of lutein, an antioxidant recommended for eye health. Web MD says that lutein is a potent antioxidant, which is found in high concentrations in the eye. The combination of lutein and zeaxanthin (another antixodant) help to protect your eyes from damaging, high energy light. Some research indicates that a diet high in lutein and zeaxanthin may reduce the risk of cataracts by as much as 50%. Coconut oil is another excellent fat that can benefit our bodies in a host of ways. Doctor Oz lists a number of benefits, including supporting thyroid health and blood sugar control. This may be related to the form of saturated fat that is found in coconut oil, called lauric acid. Lauric acid is a medium-chain triglyceride. This kind of fat actually boosts immune system, and has antibiotic, antiviral and antifungal properties. It may also be a tool in your weight loss arsenal. A study in 2009 actually showed the eating 2 Tablespoons of coconut oil daily, allowed subjects to lose belly fat more effectively. Even better news for those who are following a low oxalate diet: both avocado and coconut oil have zero oxalate! Nuts, Seeds and Legumes Unfortunately, many foods in this category are high oxalate – and so won't qualify for our super food list. While you might be able to have a couple of walnut halves, or a similar amount of pecans, nuts are generally just to high to have in servings of more than 3-5 pieces. However, if you are looking for a superfood in this category, look no further than pumpkin seeds! Pumpkin seeds are an excellent source of vegetable-based protein, and are another portable food. A great snack for the health conscious can be made with raisins and pumpkin seeds – both are low oxalate, and the protein of the pumpkin seeds will help you to stay fuller longer. According to LiveStrong.com, a handful of pumpkin seeds will give you over 8 grams of protein. At the same time, pumpkin seeds are low in sugar, and provide you with fiber as part of the carbohydrate in them. You will also get vitamin A, vitamin B, vitamin K, thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, magnesium, calcium, iron, manganese, zinc, potassium, copper and phosphorus in that small and compact package! If pumpkin seeds don't qualify as a super food, it's hard to say what would! When it comes to legumes, many are stars for protein, but one of the best options is the red lentil. Lentils in general are easier to prepare than other types of legumes – they do not require the soaking and preparation time that many legumes do. At the same time, they are powerhouses of nutrition, with molybdenum, folate, fiber, copper, phosphorus and manganese all at more than 50% of your daily requirement. One cup of cooked lentils will also give you 36 % of your daily need for protein, according to World's Healthiest Foods. And all this nutrition is provided in a food that is virtually fat free and low in calories. You cannot go wrong! As an added benefit, some studies have found that eating high fiber foods like red lentils may reduce the risk of heart disease. The more fiber, the lower the risk of heart disease. Fish We are always hearing that we need to have more fish in our diets. It seems sometimes that not a week goes by when we are not hearing that we should be eating less meat, and getting less fat – with the suggestion that more fish would benefit us. When you think of the super food of fish, you have to think of salmon. Salmon is a fatty fish, and it's one of the best sources available for omega-3 fatty acids. In today's world of processed foods, omega-3's are one of the nutrients that we don't get enough of. Your best bet with salmon is to get wild-caught fish. Farmed salmon do not have the same nutrient profile, which may be related to the kind of food they are fed. Along with the decreased nutrient profile, studies have indicated that farmed salmon contains significantly higher concentrations of a number of contaminants (including PCBs, dieldrins, toxaphenes, dioxins and chlorinated pesticides) than wild caught salmon. World's Healthiest Foods states that a 4 ounce piece of Coho salmon will get you 55% of your daily requirements for omega-3 fats. On top of that, you'll get more than 50% of your daily requirement for vitamin B12, vitamin D, selenium, vitamin B3, protein and phosphorus, as well as other B vitamins and minerals. Omega-3 fatty acids will provide you a host of benefits, from reduction of inflammation, to better brain function. Omega-3 fat is also heart healthy, and can contribute to a reduced risk of heart attack, stroke, high blood pressure and other cardiovascular disease. Research indicates that eating salmon at least 2 to 3 times a week will give you the best benefits. Spice it up Spices can be a bit tricky, if you want to keep your oxalate low. Many spices – while tasty – are very high in oxalate! A great example of this is turmeric. A staple in most curry recipes, turmeric is extremely high oxalate – so while it has a reputation as a super food, it would not be a good choice if you are trying to keep your oxalate low. So what is your option if you love to eat foods spiced with turmeric? Well, the easiest approach is to stock your spice rack with a health food store supplement; cook with curcumin extract! While it may seem a bit odd at first, if you buy a curcumin extract (which is the extract from turmeric), you can get the flavor and leave the oxalate behind. While not technically a "food" when you cook with a supplement, you certainly get all the benefits of the original super food – turmeric – without the downside of oxalate. Another highly beneficial spice is cinnamon. Research clearly shows how helpful cinnamon is for managing blood sugar. However, ground cinnamon is an extremely high oxalate spice. So how can you get the flavor you want, while avoiding the oxalate? One solution is to cook with a cinnamon extract that you buy at the health food store! One brand known to be low oxalate is Doctor's Best. It is a dry extract in capsules – simply break open the capsules and use the contents in your dish. This allows you to get all the therapeutic benefits of the extract as well as the taste. You can also cook with essential oils and culinary oils – but use them carefully. Essential oils can be very strong and can irritate the tissues of the mouth and digestive tract. One drop of good quality essential cinnamon oil will replace as much as 1 tablespoon of ground cinnamon. Culinary oils are made for flavoring – follow the directions on the product that you buy. Either way, you will get the taste – and you avoid the oxalate. Enjoying Your Food! As with anyone who wants to eat a healthy diet full of super foods, the trick is to focus on the best nutrition, and get lots of variety. While some foods may not be as "super" as others, if you are making colorful meals, with healthful selections from across the spectrum, you'll be doing your body a favor with flavor! Where Does Oxalate Go? Once you have eaten oxalate, you have to excrete it through urine, feces or sweat. But what happens if you don't? A study on rats was able to trace where in the body a dose of oxalate remained. The scientists used a special carbon molecule – carbon 14 – in the oxalate they gave to the rats, so that they could find the oxalate wherever it went in the body. What they found is that if the oxalate was not excreted from the body, it was stored everywhere: 68% in the bones 9% in the spleen 8% in the adrenal glands 3% in the kidneys 3% in the liver 8% in the rest of the body These results are in direct opposition to conventional medical thinking, that oxalate only affects the kidneys. It clearly shows us that the whole body – but particularly the bones, key glands and detoxification organs – are all affected. This is another good reason to reduce the amount of oxalate in your diet! Is Spinach Really That Bad For You? A relatively simple study in the late 1930's looked at rats fed a diet that was only adequate in calcium. To bring the levels of calcium up, the rats were given spinach, equaling about 8% of their diet. While most of us think of spinach in terms of iron, it is also relatively high in calcium. The results of the study were shocking: 47. A high percentage of rats died between the age of 21 days and 90 days 48. The bones of the rats were extremely low in calcium (despite adding it to the diet through the spinach) 49. Tooth structure was poor and dentine of the teeth poorly calcified 50. For these animals, reproduction was impossible. Researchers concluded that not only did spinach not supply the needed calcium (because of the oxalate), but the spinach also rendered the calcium from other foods unavailable. What we know now is that oxalate is a mineral chelator – and rather than delivering minerals, it was robbing them from the rats. Getting Your Vitamin K Vitamin K is a very important nutrient. Life Extension indicates that new research from 2014 links vitamin K to longevity. In fact, the highest intakes of vitamin K reduced the likelihood of dying from any cause by 36%! So, you definitely want to get vitamin K in your diet. However, most of us think that we need to eat high oxalate greens – like spinach – in order to get good amounts of vitamin K. Nothing could be further from the truth! Kale, collards and turnip greens are all higher in vitamin K than spinach, and they have a fraction of the oxalate.
  3. Celiac.com 12/11/2017 - With blazing progress in 3D printing technology, the future of numerous fields from house building to cake-making and, yes, cooking, is literally being written, or printed, before our very eyes. Food is definitely one of those arenas that will see major influence for 3d printing. In the future, more and more kitchens will come with one of more 3d printers that deliver highly customized food choices for chefs, on demand. Currently, platform for 3D printing personalized food are being developed for numerous applications, including gluten-free, vegetarian, vegan, and other specialized diet markets. In a talk presented at the 3D Printing and Beyond: Current and Future Trends conference at Hebrew university on October 25, Prof. Ido Braslavsky presented breakthrough 3D-printing innovations by Israeli and international experts from academia and industry. The conference was organized by the 3D & Functional Printing Center at the Hebrew University and Yissum, with the support of the Jerusalem Development Authority, the Ministry of Jerusalem Affairs and the Jerusalem Municipality. One breakthrough touted by Baslavsky was the ability to use 3D food printing to serve "numerous populations including the gluten-free, vegetarian and vegan markets, as well as the specialized diet market, for anyone from athletes to people with diabetes or celiac disease." In the very near future, chefs will be able to use a single machine to automatically prepare, mix, form and cook personalized food. Yaron Daniely, head of the university’s Yissum Research & Development technology-transfer company, called the technology nothing short of revolutionary. The self-assembly properties of nano-cellulose fibers enable the addition and binding of proteins, carbohydrates and fats as well as controlling the food’s texture. The food products could then be cooked, baked, fried or grilled while being printed out in the three dimensional space. "The idea is to enable full control of the substances used, for the purpose of creating healthy and tasty meals that can be eaten immediately. This has the potential to address a variety of challenges facing the field of nutrition, from the demand for personalized food … to addressing the problem of lack of food in developing countries," said Daniely. Will printed food be the future of eating, gluten-free and otherwise? Stay tuned for more news on that front. Read more at: Israel21c.org
  4. I miss Chinese Food, and pizza, I miss just getting something to go and going out eating hamburgers and what not. The gluten free bread never taste the same not to me anyway. I miss eating the hot and sour soup that was my favorite comfort food. I get a bit jealous here at work when they have food parties with all kinds of hotdogs and hamburgers, cookies and cakes, I don't think most people even know what celiac is. When you think of a cook out or going out to a food festival you think of a lot of breaded products, some people say "oh just a bit won't hurt you." Or it's just a crumb." They don't get it, my father still hasn't gotten it either, he offers me gluten products all the time saying "I'm sure this won't hurt." A bit silly I know, but never realize how much I would miss gluten, it's mainly the Chinese food I miss. I love Asian food but most of it if not all has gluten.
  5. Celiac.com 05/16/2008 - Knowing the Kitchen on Your Travels As you travel there is no way around it—you need to eat at a restaurant. If you are like me, you probably don’t look forward towards eating out. I have been trained by some of the finest chefs in the world and there wasn’t enough training to prepare me for eating out gluten-free. Don’t get me wrong, if I was not celiac I could take the menus apart and know everything necessary to impress my wife and order the right food and wine. Yes I even was involved in wine tasting in Palm Beach Florida. That was then and this is now. Walking into the restaurant, sadly, the first thing I do is ask for the manager and whether or not they have a gluten free menu. I have been told over and over about restaurants that have a gluten-free menu, and yes, this is great, but in these cases I have found that most of the time: The staff in the back is not trained in proper food handling techniques, and cross contamination often occurs. The wait staff (who know I just ordered gluten-free) still put bread rolls on my plate for me to eat, or even croutons on my salad (again, lack of proper training). The gluten-free menu is limited to 3 or 4 items when the full menu has over 40 items to choose from. Why can’t I have an appetizer, soup, salad, entrée and a dessert? It is already there in the menu so why do I have to be limited? Like I said, it is nice that they offer a gluten-free menu, but when I go out to eat—especially on vacation—I want to be treated special just like my wife and kids. So when I look at the menu I look for the food I like and then I use my Chef Daniel's restaurant paper to write down exactly what I want and how I want it prepared.I have had comments that some of you think the chef is going to get mad and that you are insulting them by writing down what you want to eat…my reply—this is hogwash! For those of you who still believe that they will be upset let’s look at what happens from the chef’s viewpoint during the day at a restaurant. He waits for the wait staff to bring in the order. It is usually on a ticket stating whether the food should be rare, medium or even broiled or sautéed. On the same ticket the wait staff tells them what vegetables or whether they will have French fries or baked potato. Hopefully you see where I am going with this. As you must have learned by now, if you have traveled to a restaurant, even one with a gluten-free menu, sometimes the staff doesn’t even know what gluten-free means, and if this is the case how could the chef possibly know? Who is training them? They come to work and are told they have to make a steak gluten-free. So they make a steak and put the garnish on it and when the customer gets it they say “wow, this is great, I am about to eat a steak from the gluten-free menu.” HOLD ON! “Oh no, the garnish on the plate is a fancy fruit relish that is made with malt vinegar.” CROSS CONTAIMNATION. What I have been saying from the start. Yes this really happen to me—the liquid from the relish ran down the plate and on my steak—this was a few years ago before I started to use my restaurant/chef skills to order my food. I have talked with some of my chef friends and not one of them said they would get offended, and it would be just like if someone came in to the restaurant and asked me to make a kosher meal. I am expected to do it right because if I didn’t they would be offended and then they would never return to the restaurant. If I pleased them, however, they would tell their friends about their positive experience. This would mean more money for the restaurant, and that makes my boss happy. Some of you will still doubt me but that is okay because when I walk into a restaurant I expect to be pampered just like everyone else does. Be sure to always have a plan B, and be prepared to leave or not eat your meal if there are problems with it. There are way too many restaurants in a town for me to get sick over a crumb. Once you start talking with the manager or the waiter you will quickly learn if what they are telling you is real or just hogwash. Another Real Experience I was given a gluten-free menu at a restaurant and I asked the waiter if he knew what gluten-free meant. He said “yes,” so I asked him whether croutons come on the salad that I had ordered. He said “sure, croutons come on all the salads and they are already made, but I can take them off”. I am not making this up folks, this was at a well known Italian restaurant that is a chain all over the USA. I switched to plan B and didn’t eat there. My wife who loves this place did eat and I went to a party store got some snacks. It might be harsh to some but if the waiter is not properly trained how do I know whether the cook or anyone else there is properly trained? Just because a restaurant has a gluten-free menu means nothing (unless I can verify that the staff was properly trained by speaking to them). Fast Food Restaurants If you have followed my articles you will know that I like some of the fast food restaurants. Many of these large chains adhere to strict cooking methods. This is good for us because they stay the same and there is less of a chance for cross contamination. In many cases these restaurants use dedicated fryers for certain foods, for example French fries. So you can usually have French fries and not worry about the batter from the chicken nuggets. Cross contamination to me is the way the “Gluten Monster” attacks us—when we least expect it. No matter how much you say or ask, if they put your food on the table that just had gluten on it you’re going to get sick. I always ask for the manager to help me. Here is an example of how I order: Could you please give me the double cheese burger with only lettuce, tomato and onion? I have a special diet request and it is very important that you do not touch any bread or crumbs from any other product. Could you please put fresh gloves on or could you use a plastic fork to get my burgers out? It is important that the cook back there doesn’t’ get my meal because he has handled other bread with those gloves. I would like catsup, mustard and mayo packages (to read the ingredients myself). I would like French fries if they are cooked in a dedicated fryer. I would like a plain salad and could you please open a fresh bag of the salad mix for me because, again, I am afraid that maybe a crumb got into the salad. If you can’t open a fresh bag of salad I would go without the salad. I would like to look at a couple of your salad dressings to see what salad dressing I can eat if that is ok with you. Beverage usually isn’t a problem. Gluten in ice cream is a possibility. Always watch the staff the whole time they are making your food to see if any mistakes are made. Never be afraid to say you don’t want something if you fear it. There are also other options, for example you might be able to do the chicken or other products if you know that they are gluten-free. Not all French fries are gluten-free. Some that have a spice on them might have wheat on them. Be sure to know your fast food place by searching online for information on what you can and can’t eat, and never be afraid to ask.Mexican Cuisine Going to Mexican restaurants is one of my favorite options. Much of the food is made with corn. After you sit down, review the menu and decide what you want. The chips are usually corn, but be sure to ask, and if so you can have them with some shredded cheese as an appetizer. Most of the salsas are made with only fresh vegetables. The main items that you ask for is to make sure they use only fresh foods for you. This is why you should ask for the manager when you walk in. The manager should be able to help you order. If you like hot sauce I would bring it myself. Those specialty items are small and handy to have if you like them. You never know what type they will have and it is nice to eat it with your Mexican meal. If you ask for refried beans and they are gluten-free, I would ask for them to open a fresh can and have them microwave it. Any of the food that is processed I would ask for fresh can and for them to microwave it. If they don’t have a microwave they can heat it up in a steamer, broiler or a sauté pan. You should always be able to eat well at a Mexican restaurant. How I Order Gluten-Free Mexican Food: I would like some corn chips and cheese melted over the top of them. You could use the above broiler or just use the microwave to do it. I would like a small tomato, whole not sliced for my salad and for my chips. I would like a mixed green salad from a fresh unopened bag with a small cucumber that I will cut myself. I would like one half of a fresh avocado for my salad and chips. I would like two tablespoons of olive oil and some red wine vinegar for my salad (maybe even a half of a lemon too). Cook 1 cup of meat (no seasoning) add to 2 corn shells and top with fresh cheese from a bag or cut fresh. Add fresh lettuce and tomato and microwave it until it is hot and melted, then add 4 ounces of corn on top. I add some hot sauce when the food comes to the table.How I Order Gluten-Free Italian Food: We can’t eat the pasta but some of the mixes that go on the pasta are great. If it is strips of chicken or shrimp, there are many items that can be looked at. With sun dried tomatoes or avocado, those could be added to your entrée or salad. They will have mussels and good meats, you just need to read what they have and make a great meal. When you look at the menu you have to ask or determine, what is sitting on the table by the chef and can I use that for my meal. Every entrée has mizzen pla. (Products in place) meaning that the chef needs everything right next to him to make his meal. If the entree you are looking at is seafood fettuccini with a cream sauce. The chef will need fresh seafood, cooked noodles, sauce, vegetables and seasoning. If this was made up already for the night, the noodles and seafood would be garbage. As a celiac you can take the seafood as long as it is not marinated in something. That goes for most of the items if you read what is in the entrée. Know what is fresh and what is frozen and you will be able to pick apart a menu. Always ask and you will learn for the next time. Sample Orders: Strips of chicken breast with no skin broiled (please metal brush the grill first before you lay my food down) cook till done, then lay sundried tomatoes on the chicken strips and top with fresh sliced mozzarella cheese and broil in top-type broiler, or microwave until melted. If there is no way to melt please slice thin and it will be good enough.• Fresh spinach with 1-2 lemon and red wine vinegar, two tablespoons olive oil extra virgin, one small tomato and 4 ounces of mozzarella cheese (I will cut the tomato and mozzarella cheese myself). • Mixed melody of seafood sauté with olive oil then reduce with wine. Place on the side when ¾ of the way done. Add ¼ cut mushrooms, shallots, fresh garlic, sun dried tomatoes and sauté until down add heavy whipping cream reduce then add the seafood (add nothing if you don’t have heavy whipping cream). Add fresh herbs chopped up or tear apart (no dried herbs).In this article I offered examples for a few types of restaurants. I could go on and on. You need to understand how restaurants work to be able to order your food to be made gluten-free. Please don’t limit yourself to the gluten-free menu only (if they have one). You should not be discriminated against because you have a health concern. That is a big word, I know, but we should be able to eat just like the next person can. Our money is just as GREEN as another person’s. I would rather pay a little more if I add something to an item then to be told that they can’t do it. That is why I say that together we can tame the Gluten Monster. When you are traveling there are a lot of restaurants to choose from. Be prepared to wait and not be rushed, try to pick a restaurant that is not busy so the chef is not rushed by 20 other orders. If you follow my approach you will have success eating out gluten-free in restaurants, and your dining experience will be pleasant—like it is suppose to be! Gluten-Free Travel Hints: You should always try to getthe manager to help you. In any restaurant they have the most time tohelp you and they will help you because they typically care more thanthe regular workers (today’s restaurants have employees that come inone day and are gone the next.help. It is sad but that is the way itis so at least try to get the manager. Don’t be ashamed to askfor anything. If you want a hot dog or the chips they put on the sideof the plate ask for a bag with the product inside. Take out your safeand forbidden lists if needed and look at them to see if you can eat aproduct. Always have your Chef Daniel's restaurant paper with you in your walletor purse. Always have a copy of your safe and forbidden lists with youin case you need it to read ingredients. Always have a gluten-free restaurant card in the language you need. Crosscontamination is the greatest risk for a celiac when traveling. Crosscontamination can happen and you would never know it, such as when thechef uses a knife to cut a piece of bread, and then they use the sameknife on your vegetables, or when the chef uses a pair of tongs to flipa breaded chicken and then uses them to flip your sauté chicken.Thereare too many other ways to mention, but the main thing is that glutencould be on the tool before it is used on your meal, and it doesn’tmatter how safe the chef thought he was because you got one crumb andyou are sick for days and that ruins your vacation. Chef Daniel P.
  6. Celiac.com 05/27/2014 - Here are seven common myths people have about celiac disease and gluten-free eating. Myth #1: Rice contains gluten, and people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance shouldn’t eat it. Status: FALSE. People with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance have adverse immune reactions to gluten proteins in wheat, rye and barley. Rice does contain gluten, just not the kind that causes adverse reactions in people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance. Plain rice is fine for people with celiac disease. Myth #2: A little gluten is okay for people with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance to eat. Status: MOSTLY FALSE. Gluten levels above 20 parts per million can cause adverse immune reactions and chronic damage in people with celiac disease. Current medical research defines gluten-levels below 20 parts per million as safe for people with celiac disease, and the FDA and other official organizations use that standard in labeling, those levels are so close to zero as to be “gluten-free.” The tiniest crumbs of bread far exceed 20ppm, so eating “a little” gluten is only possible by eating “gluten-free” food. In fact, the only properly recognized treatment for celiac disease is a gluten-free diet. Myth #3: Food made with gluten-free ingredients is safe for people with celiac disease. Status: FALSE Just because food is made with gluten-free ingredients, it is not necessarily safe for people with celiac disease. Case in point, Domino’s Pizza recently introduced gluten-free pizza crusts. However, these pizzas are prepared in the same areas and ovens as Domino’s regular pizzas, and are likely contaminated with gluten from wheat flour. These pizzas are not safe for people with celiac disease. There are many similar cases in the restaurant world. Contamination is a serious issue for some celiacs, so buyers be aware and be wary. Myth #4: Celiac disease is a food allergy. Status: FALSE Celiac disease is not a food allergy or an intolerance, it is an autoimmune disease. People with celiac disease suffer damage to the lining of the small intestine when they eat wheat, rye or barley. They also face higher risks for many other auto-immune conditions. Myth #5: Celiac disease only affects people of European ancestry Status: FALSE Celiac disease is more common in people of northern European ancestry, but it affects all ethnic groups and is found in southern Asia, the Middle East, North Africa and South America. Myth #6: Celiac disease is a children’s condition Status: FALSE Celiac disease can develop at any age. In fact, celiac disease is most commonly diagnosed in people aged 40-60 years old. Myth #7: Celiac disease can be painful, but isn't life-threatening. It’s true that classic celiac disease symptoms, like stomach pain, bone pain, fatigue, headaches, skin rash, and digestive issues, won’t kill patients outright. However, undiagnosed or untreated, celiac disease can trigger other autoimmune disorders, and leave patients at much greater risk of developing certain types of deadly cancer.
  7. My Celiac Disease is causing really stressful family drama. This has been an issue since I was diagnosed, but has gotten worse lately. The problem is with my dad. He and my mom live in the same town as I do and I often eat there. Because I am so sensitive to gluten, my mom has tried to keep their house 100% gluten-free. But my dad keeps bringing in bread and then gets bread crumbs around the kitchen. He tries to be careful, but he slips up and uses the butter to butter the bread and therefore gets the butter contaminated. He has used this butter to fry eggs and many other things. So the butter gets in the dishes, the utensils and the sponges. Despite being on a strict gluten-free diet for nearly 5 years, my antibodies are still slightly elevated at this point. I don't even eat out in restaurants at all because of cross-contamination. I have to cook all my food myself. However, I'll eat at my parent's house sometimes and they will cook for me. I have trusted them to make safe meals for me (and they have read many books about Celiac Disease and are very familiar with cross-contamination). My mom doesn't want any gluten in the house, but my dad keeps bringing in bread. We have tried to talk to him about this problem but every time we bring it up, he gets very defensive and takes it personally. I have told him that I am afraid I can't eat any meals that they prepare because of possible cross-contamination. My mom spent nearly a week cleaning the entire kitchen but he keeps bringing in bread. She is extremely frustrated with him, as am I. It's very perplexing because my dad is a very kind and loving person. But I think he is behaving selfishly when it comes to this. He'd rather bring bread home and eat it and therefore put my health at risk. But he doesn't see it that way. He thinks my mom and I are overreacting. However, he is getting old and forgetful. He can be very absent minded at times and doesn't seem to remember the correct protocols for dealing with cross-contamination. Last year, I was a guest in someone's house and the kitchen was dirty and full of crumbs. I ended up getting exposure even though I prepared my own food and using my own dishes. I was having panic attacks and other symptoms for almost 2 weeks afterward. He saw what I went through. But I think he's in denial when he sets his kitchen up to be a similar risk. This has lead to a lot of tension between him and my mom. I have thought about giving him 2 choices: either he stops bringing in bread and I will eat their meals OR he continues to bring in bread and I will not eat any of their meals. I hate to think that my disease causes so much stress and drama in my family. Fortunately, they are a lot more understanding than a lot of families, but my dad has his pitfalls. This is really stressing me out and I think it's causing unnecessary drama. Any suggestions?
  8. I have a question. I have Celiac Disease and am very sensitive to gluten. In fact, I only prepare my own food and never eat out. However, I do sometimes use other microwaves to heat up my food at work (and these microwaves have been used for gluten-containing foods). Am I in danger of having tiny bits of gluten fall into my food while I microwave it? (I do have my food on a plate or in a bowl, with no direct contact with the oven). Is it also possible that I could get gluten "fumes" that will get into my food and contaminate it?
  9. This article originally appeared in the Summer 2004 edition of Celiac.com's Journal of Gluten-Sensitivity. Celiac.com 10/13/2014 - Sugar—the very word brought the lively conversation at my dinner party to a screeching halt. As my guests savored their cake, I could feel ten pairs of ears eavesdropping as I discussed this emotionally laden word with the woman seated next to me. “My friend made a chocolate cake,” she was saying, “and wanted to cut back on sugar in her diet, so she made a few adjustments to the recipe. Instead of semisweet chocolate, she used unsweetened chocolate. In place of the sugar, she used a few tablespoons of Splenda.” But, my guest continued with a look of puzzlement on her face, “the cake didn’t taste like cake at all and it was hard and chewy and kind of rough-looking. My friend had to throw it away.” In these days of low-sugar diets, many of us—like my guest’s friend—are tempted to skip the sugar in baking, or at least reduce it somewhat. Much maligned and often relegated to the back of the pantry, most of us regard sugar as a source of calories and are unaware of its other roles. Now, before I go any further let’s set the record straight. I think we eat far too much sugar. I look for ways to reduce it in my diet whenever I can. I avoid sugary soft drinks, only eat desserts on special occasions, and watch for hidden sugar in commercial foods. Nonetheless, after over 10 years of developing gluten-free recipes, I have a healthy respect for the role of sugar in baking. It is particularly important for us gluten-free bakers, because we already have to alter the flavor of our foods by removing wheat flour. If you thinking about omitting sugar in your baking, here’s what you should know: First, the obvious. Sugar makes things taste sweet. You can replace sugar with a substitute sweetener but the cake may taste different because we associate “sweetness” with the distinct flavor of sugar (even though you may think of sugar as “neutral” because it’s white). Sugar accentuates the flavor of food. A chocolate cake tastes downright strange without sugar, but delicious with the right amount. Try this experiment: Drink unsweetened tea and then add a little sugar to it and notice how much stronger the flavor is. Sugar tenderizes the crumb and makes it finer and moister. In contrast, substitutes like Splenda tend to produce a crumb that is larger, tougher, and somewhat drier. Sugar encourages the browning process on the crust of baked goods. It’s this browning that we often use as an indicator that a cake is “done,” and, it’s that tendency to brown that relates to its next benefit. Sugar produces a slightly crispy, shiny exterior on baked goods that makes them more attractive. It’s the sucrose in sugar that does this and, since sucrose is missing in Splenda, it can’t promote the same level of browning. Next time you’re tempted to reduce or omit the sugar in baked goods, follow these tips: Instead of using all Splenda, use half sugar and half Splenda. You will lower the calorie content, but your cake will be more tender, brown more attractively, and have a finer crumb than if you use all Splenda. A cake may bake a little faster, so check it about five minutes before the recommended cooking time. It may also have a little less volume and not rise as high. Add a couple tablespoons of honey to the batter. Honey is a natural humectant and encourages the cake to retain moisture so it won’t dry out as quickly. Of course, honey has its own flavor which you may detect if you use a lot of it. Increase the amount of fat in the recipe by 25%, but be sure to use healthier fats. Canola oil and (light) olive oil are good in baking and are good for you. Of course, this will increase the fat content and calorie content (a tablespoon of these oils is roughly 100 calories), but your baked goods will taste better and look better because fat is a flavor carrier and also tenderizes the crumb. Use a topping to conceal the rough crust found in low-sugar baked goods. For example, a streusel topping on muffins will partially conceal their rough tops. Rather than drastically reducing the amount of sugar at the beginning of your sugar-reduced diet, gradually cut back on the sugar a little more each time you bake. Your palate will adjust and eventually you won’t want “ultra-sweet” foods as much. Try an alternative sweetener such as agave nectar. Even though it has calories, it has a low glycemic level (the rate at which it raises your blood sugar levels). Finally, (and this is the tough one) just try eating less of those sugary baked foods to reduce your sugar intake. Maybe half a muffin, or a smaller slice of cake, or only one small cookie instead of a large one. Our portion sizes have crept up over the past couple of decades to the point where our muffins are anywhere from 3-5 times larger than a standard USDA serving. Oh, you’re probably wondering about that dessert my guests were eating. It was a flourless chocolate cake from my book Gluten-Free 101 made with one-third sugar, one-third Splenda, and one-third agave nectar. It was topped with whipped cream (sweetened with agave nectar) lightly dusted with Dutch cocoa, and garnished with a bright red strawberry and a few chocolate-covered espresso beans. The slices were reasonably-sized—not the massive servings we often find in restaurants. My guests were relieved to learn that this dessert was a sweet, yet sensible ending to the meal…and, they ate every last crumb!
  10. I was diagnosed with Celiac several months ago, about 2 days before I bolted north to the backwoods of New Hampshire to start my summer job at a backcountry hut. I didn't have time to mentally/physically process the diagnosis, and now I'm in a whirlwind of trying to cope but I don't have a support group up here and I don't know how to deal with this. Most of all, I don't know how to eat anymore. I'm basically living off gluten-free granola bars and jars of peanut butter. I know I'm deficient in everything, but I don't know where to start. Can someone help direct me to easy, cheap meal planning for celiacs? Thank you!
  11. Hey guys, So I have a question that concerns nourishment as well as muscle building. Ive been training pretty hard over the past year or so in excelling my fitness as well as athletic ability. Over the year I have gotten stronger and leaner, also lost a lot of weight (due to hard cardio and celiac) But I noticed I wasn't making any real muscle gains, I thought I had maybe overtrained, I was fatigued and tired a lot.. So I was recently confirmed that I have celiac (as of one week ago actually) and have been gluten free since. I used to do vigorous exercise, to failure at some points, and that combined with malnourishment probably made me lose muscle. I am a very healthy eater, and very fit, yet I have the body of a kid who eats taco bell every day. I really enjoy hard exercise and hope to get back at it. How long do you suppose it takes to heal until I can get back to working hard, and running a lot? (and actually seeing results for the work I'm putting in) Thanks a lot! Any suggestions at all are much appreciated, especially comments from any experienced athlete/weightlifter/sports trainer.
  12. Celiac.com 12/23/2013 - Symptoms of celiac disease negatively impact the social activities and emotional states of some patients. A team of researchers recently set out to assess rates of altered eating behavior in celiac patients. The research team included V. Passananti, M. Siniscalchi, F. Zingone, C. Bucci, R. Tortora, P. Iovino, and C. Ciacci. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine at University Federico II of Naples, Italy, and with the Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Salerno, Baronissi Campus, in Salerno, Italy. The researchers evaluated 100 celiac adults and 100 control subjects of statistically similar gender, age, and physical activity. The researchers had both celiac patients and control subjects complete a dietary interview and the Binge Eating Staircases, Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2), Eating Attitudes Test, Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale, State Trait Anxiety Inventory Forma Y (STAI-Y1 and STAI-Y2), and Symptom Check List (SCL-90). The results showed that, compared with the control group, celiac patients had higher STAI-Y1 and STAI-Y2, Somatization, Interpersonal, Sensitivity, and Anxiety scores of the SLC-90. EDI-2 differed in pulse thinness, social insecurity, perfectionism, inadequacy, aceticisms, and interpersonal diffidences between celiac disease patients and healthy female controls, whilst only in interceptive awareness between celiac disease patients and healthy male controls. Celiac patients with gastrointestinal symptoms showed dependently higher EAT-26 scores. The EAT26 showed a connection between indices of diet-related disorders in both celiac disease, and the feminine gender after controlling for anxiety and depression. Eating disorders appear to be more frequent in young celiac women than in celiac men and in healthy control subjects. Overall, these results indicate that pathological eating behavior in celiac adults may be due to celiac disease itself, rather than the gastrointestinal related symptoms or psychological factors. Source: Gastroenterology Research and Practice Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 491657
  13. Celiac.com 07/09/2012 - These handy tips will help you to better navigate the challenges of gluten-free living in both dorm rooms and shared housing. Having the right tools, and adopting some wise practices will help you eat gluten-free week-in and week-out, without breaking your bank account, or risking gluten exposure. Having a few tools can help your efforts come together much more easily, and keep your eating consistent over the semester. Helpful tools: Rice Cooker Small Crock Pot Microwave Blender Fridge/freezer (even a miniature one will come in handy) Resealable freezer bags Sharpie permanent marker Shop wisely by making lists What's the old saying? Proper prior preparation prevents poor performance? Nowhere is this more true than with a gluten-free diet. Planning your meals in advance can save you time, money, stress, and, of yes, the pain of an adverse reaction to gluten. This practice starts with shopping, and shopping starts with planning. Make lists and use them. Check out Asian, Mexican, and other ethnic markets in your area. They often have good, gluten-free food at reasonable prices. Cook your food in advance You can make the most of your smart shopping practices by planning and preparing your meals in advance. Consider spending one day each week, or at least a good block of time, cooking and prepping food. Just a few hours of gluten-free cooking can prepare you to sail smoothly through the week ahead. Use all the tools at your disposal. Use your crockpot, use your rice cooker, your freezer bags, and your markers. Keep your own shelf and label your foods Package and label the food you make, then store it in your fridge or freezer. By packaging and labeling food, your housemates are less likely to "accidentally" eat it. If they do, you'll likely be on top of the situation. Keep gluten-free dry goods on hand Having a drawer full of gluten-free food that does not require a fridge or freezer is also helpful. Good items to have include microwaveable rice, gluten-free pretzels, crackers, chips tuna fish, fruit snacks, and beef jerky. Gluten-free Condiments Keep a collection of spices and sauces to help keep your snacks from getting boring. Good things to keep on hand include honey, gluten-free tamari, mayonnaise, ketchup, mustard, and hot sauce. Cover the Basics Make sure you keep simple items that are rich in protein and carbohydrates on hand, so that you won’t go hungry and will always have gluten-free food available. Avoid the Dining Hall Unless your dining hall is one of the more progressive campus dining halls that offer a variety of good, reliable gluten-free foods, you should avoid it. Some good foods to prepare in advance or keep on hand include: Fried rice - Frying rice is a good way to use leftover food, and it's easy to pack and take with you to campus. Try it with lots of veggies, meat, eggs, and any other items that seem tasty. Grilled or roasted chicken, or other meats cut into small slices - These are great items to add to your fried rice, or to your pasta sauce. Stews, soups or casseroles - Stews, soups and casseroles freeze easily and age well. They can be prepackaged and frozen ahead of time. They can be easily thawed in the bag by placing them in the microwave, or in lukewarm water. Sauces - Making sauces in advance and freezing them can cut your food prep time during the week. They can give you plenty of room for adjustment and broaden your options. Ideas include: Pasta sauce, pizza sauce, sweet and sour sauce, teriyaki sauce, Pizza - Use your favorite gluten-free pizza crust to make gluten-free pizza. Then place it in individual bags, label and freeze. If you have hungry roommates with boundary issues, consider numbering the bags to keep track of them. French toast - Making French toast with your favorite gluten-free bread is a great way to have a quick, reliable breakfast ready to go. Fruit - cutting up fruit and putting it in bags for the week ahead is a great way to be ready to make quick breakfast smoothies, or to have a great fruit salad ready to go. Yogurt and kefir are also good to have on hand. They are excellent for making fruit smoothies, or for giving you much needed protein and fat with that fruit smoothie. Dessert items - Chocolate chip cookies, brownies, and cakes are a great way to enjoy dessert when you want it without being forced to choose from the often dismal gluten-free selection at the local coffee shop, or the over-priced frozen section of your local grocery store. Lastly, compile a list of reliable local eateries where you can get good, safe gluten-free food when you are in a pinch, or need to dine on the spur of the moment.
  14. Plan your meals: It sounds simple, but it’s one that is often ignored. Sit down before you do your weekly grocery run. Know what you are going to make for each meal including snacks. Find out what’s on sale before you make your weekly meal plan. Stick to the list when you shop! Develop a file of dependable, go to gluten-free recipes. My people report that, when they are short on time, that’s when they are likely to make extravagant purchases. Take the thinking and guess work out of meal planning by looking through your file. You can even write down the estimated cost of the meal. Eat foods that are naturally gluten free found at the regular grocery store. Corn tortillas are cheap and have many uses, including for sandwich wraps. Beans are a nutrient-rich starch substitute, as are lentils. Eat whole foods. Whether you are gluten-free or not, it is healthier not to eat packaged, processed foods. Just because a product is marked gluten free doesn’t mean it’s good for you. Processed gluten-free products often lack nutrients. Limit these to a couple times per week or less. Eat foods that are in season. This means they had to travel less far to reach your grocery store, therefore they will be cheaper. Grow your own. Learn how to can and/or jar the extras. Live in a cool climate? Some veggies can be started inside. Make a soup. Soups are filling, and they are a great way to use up items in the fridge. Eat more vegetarian and vegan meals. Eliminating meat from two dinners per week will save you quite a bit of money. Eat breakfast for dinner. Make a frittata – cook 3 strips of bacon in a skillet. Set aside and drain off most of the fat. Add diced onions. Cook for 5 minutes. Add diced red pepper. Cook another 5 minutes. Add a package of thawed, drained frozen spinach. Salt and pepper to taste. Add bacon back in. Beat 5 eggs and pour them all over the filling. Top with cheese and bake at 350 for 8 – 12 minutes, or until the eggs are set. Serves 2 – 3. Get creative. For thickening sauces or gravy, substitute equal amounts of cornstarch for flour. Mashed potato flakes also make a great, inexpensive thickener and binder in place of breadcrumbs. Xanthan gum is used in many gluten-free recipes to serve as the “glue” to hold the product together; use 2 tsp. unflavored gelatin to replace 1tsp. xanthum gum in some recipes such as cookies. Cornmeal or crushed potato chips can be substituted when a recipe calls for a coating or crunchy topping. Buy in bulk. Once you found something you like, save big by buying in a large quantity. The Gluten-Free Mall has bulk discounts and many other ways to save you money. See their "Shop Smart & Save Money!" section on the top-right corner of their site. Create or join a bulk buying group. Ask around at your local support group, or link up with local folks online. If you like the same products buy a bulk order and split it. Cook ahead and freeze meals in individual or family-size servings. If you are not someone that cooks and you are watching your budget, it makes sense to learn. Invest in a good vacuum food sealer. This will help keep leftovers fresh for longer = less waste. Bake 1-2 times per month. Things like Pizza crusts, bread, and pie crusts will freeze well if wrapped properly. Make gluten-free cookie dough from scratch and freeze in a roll. Cut and bake what you need. This will curb your desire to buy an expensive mix. Start a gluten-free dinner swap (like a holiday cookie swap). Get a few families to cook up a large quantity of gluten-free meals and swap them for variety! Join a food co-op. Co-ops are groups who use their purchasing power to get lower prices. Make your own blend of gluten-free flours ahead of time and store in an air tight container. To prevent contamination, purchase extra appliances (like a toaster) from Craig’s List or Goodwill. Track your purchases. Seeing it in black and white can be very revealing. Consult with your employer’s human resources department. Do they offer a flexible spending account (FSA) benefit? These accounts hold your money pre-tax for medical purchases. If so, will the FSA recognize gluten free food (and related shipping charges)? Get it in writing! If your employer doesn’t offer this benefit, ask them to look into it. This will save you about 30%. If you are not using an FSA and you spend a lot of money on medical expenses, consult with your accountant. Are a portion of your gluten-free food purchases tax deductible? Shipping charges often can be reimbursed from this account, as can mileage to and from specialty stores.
  15. This article originally appeared in the Autumn 2002 edition of Celiac.com's Journal of Gluten-Sensitivity. The results of my latest Celiac.com survey indicate that 71 percent of 983 respondents dine out less often now than before they went on a gluten-free diet. Further, 74 percent of those who do eat out are now more nervous and uncomfortable during their dining experience, and 50 percent of them felt this way because it is either too much trouble to explain their diet, or because they felt that restaurant employees are in too big of a hurry to worry about their special needs. As a resident of San Francisco, a city that supposedly has enough table space in its restaurants to seat everyone in the city at once, these results disappoint me. Not because I eat out less due to my gluten-restricted diet, or am uncomfortable when I do so, but because I don’t believe that anyone with celiac disease who is armed with the proper knowledge needs to fear or avoid eating out. In order to eat out safely the first thing that you must check before going into a restaurant is your attitude. If you are the type of person who is too embarrassed to send your meal back because they didn’t follow your instructions or if you are the opposite type and are so demanding that you often annoy the staff—you will need to find some middle ground. It took me a while to reach this point, but I can now go into a restaurant with confidence and look at getting a good gluten-free meal there as a personal challenge that begins when I walk through their door. Upon entering a restaurant the first thing that you need to notice is how busy the place is, including how stressed out the workers seem to be—the more stressed out they are, the more tactful you will need to be to get what you want—a safe meal. One rule that has served me well in all situations is to keep it simple—both your order and how you place it. I never try to give a scientific discourse on celiac disease to restaurant workers, as I have found that it only serves to frustrate or confuse them. Tell them only what they need to know—that you have an allergy to wheat (using the term gluten will typically lead back into long explanations) and need to make sure that your dish is wheat-free. I wouldn’t tell them that you’ll get violently ill if ANY wheat ends up in your meal, as some people recommend, because they probably won’t want to serve you. I also wouldn’t go into detail about hidden ingredients that contain wheat—it will take too long to explain and you will again run the risk of scaring them into not serving you. I usually don’t approach the chef unless it’s very slow because he is probably the busiest person in a restaurant. When it’s busy I always ask the waiter to give the chef special order instructions, both verbally and in writing on the order ticket. Rather than try to educate the staff and make them experts on gluten, it’s far more efficient if you are the one who becomes more educated with regard to the dishes you like to eat so that you can order them in a manner that will ensure your safety. I strongly believe that your diet is ultimately your responsibility and not a restaurant’s (with the exception of any mistakes that they might make). The key to ordering a gluten-free meal is your beforehand knowledge of its ingredients and how it is prepared. Most people who have cooked have a basic understanding of how certain dishes are prepared, and how they could contain gluten. Even if you aren’t a cook you might have had the meal you want to order enough times to know something about its ingredients and preparation methods. You need only to know enough about the meal to ask the right questions so that you can alter any preparation methods that might cause it to contain gluten. For example, whenever I order a salad I always tell them no croutons, and to bring me olive oil and vinegar for dressing. If I order fried rice in a Chinese restaurant I order it without soy sauce, or I give them my own bottle to cook with. If you order something properly and it arrives incorrectly, send it back! I recently ordered Chinese food with my family and did everything right—I told them about my wheat allergy, gave them my bottle of soy sauce, and told the waitress that I wanted to make sure that there was no wheat flour in or on anything that I ordered (but that corn starch is fine—if you don’t clarify this point it might unnecessarily eliminate or alter many Chinese dishes). When our food arrived the chicken I ordered was breaded. After inquiring about it I found out that they used wheat flour so I sent it back, the waitress apologized, and it was no big deal. I recommend that you purchase and read basic cookbooks for the types of foods that you like to eat so that you can place your order with confidence. For example, I own several cookbooks for my favorite cuisines, including ones that cover Mexican, Chinese, Thai, Italian, Vietnamese, Indian and American foods. I typically look over the relevant cookbook before I go to a particular restaurant so that I can get an idea of what I want to order and how to order it. The more up-front knowledge you have about how the dishes you like are prepared, the easier it will be for you to order them in a manner that ensures that they are safe. Having these books around is also great should you begin to cook more at home, which 65 percent of my survey respondents already do, and this is something that I also highly recommend. Generally speaking I try to avoid large chain restaurants as much as possible because many of their items are highly processed and contain a huge number of ingredients. Their employees typically have no idea what’s in their foods. I think that many of the survey respondents are with me on this, as 70 percent of them also eat less processed and junk foods due to their gluten-free diets. I only eat at chain restaurants if I am able to check their Web sites in advance for safe items, and if I can’t do this I am extra careful about what I order. I try to eat at smaller, family-owned establishments because they usually know the ingredients and preparation methods for all of their dishes. Additionally, authentic ethnic foods such as Mexican, Vietnamese, Thai, Indian, Indonesian, Japanese and Korean typically use little wheat, so I lean more towards these types of foods when I eat out. The transition to a gluten-free diet isn’t easy—74 percent of survey respondents thought it was difficult or very difficult. Like many things in life, it took some up-front work on your part to be able to make the successful transition to a gluten-free diet, and the same is true for eating out. I like to think that what you put into it, you will get out of it—the more you learn about cuisine and its various methods of preparation, the more pleasant and care-free your dining experiences will be, and the more likely you will be to get a safe meal. Life’s too short to not enjoy the basic pleasure of eating out, so the next time you get the urge, do your homework first, then take charge of your meal at the restaurant!
  16. For immediate release. Please post. Celiac.com 07/13/2010 - Writer, researcher, and celiac advocate, Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed. D., and long-time celiac advocate Scott Adams, founder and owner of Celiac.com, the largest and longest running website that caters to the gluten-free lifestyle, have joined forces to bring you a new, broad spectrum book about the many facets of gluten-induced illnesses and how to avoid or reverse them. In their new book, Hoggan, Adams, and their 27 co-authors reveal many of the hidden secrets of this widespread, insidious health hazard. This is more than a book about celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. It is a how-to manual for getting a diagnosis, reversing symptoms, improving one’s health, and living well on a gluten-free diet. Cereal Killers: Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free A to Z is a new resource that provides the most diverse exploration of this topic currently available. From the research scientist to the concerned parent, all voices are heard in this novel approach to curing gluten-induced ailments. There is information here for all levels of interest in this burgeoning new area of research and health care. "Hoggan & Adams have brought together a wide range of viewpoints at multiple levels. This book should appeal to a broad spectrum of readers who want a full and enriched perspective." --Robert Machon, July 12, 2010 Newly diagnosed celiac and gluten sensitive patients complain about conflicting information, from the safety of oats to the hazards of older grains. Cereal Killers has the answers to these and many other questions. Even seasoned members of the gluten-free community want a better understanding of their illness and the bounds of a safe diet. These questions are also addressed. Common errors, common misconceptions about the diet, and unusual insights into the dynamics of inflammation, disease, and recovery are all offered by one or more of the many voices that form this unique offering. But the information runs much deeper than that. Cereal Killers explores subtle nuances of immune reactions, often overlooked signs and symptoms of celiac disease, and a host of elements of associated illnesses that miraculously clear up on the diet. Questions about non-celiac gluten sensitivity are addressed in detail, along with explorations of what signs and symptoms should signal testing for gluten sensitivity and how much credence these indicators of disease should be given. In all, readers are offered a rich resource for understanding the importance of dietary compliance along with the cracks in the system through which patients sometimes slip because of current deficiencies in the understanding of gluten sensitivity and celiac disease. Jointly published by CreateSpace, Cereal Killers ISBN: 978-1449918200 is available through Celiac.com, and quality book sellers such as Blackbond Books.
  17. This article originally appeared in the Winter 2003 edition of Celiac.coms Scott-Free Newsletter. Evolution is an interactive process. Those of us who learn quickly and well are more likely to survive, thrive, and reproduce. Learning capacities then, are factors in the survival of our genes. Research is now revealing that cereal grains, along with other allergenic and highly glycemic foods, pose a serious threat to our sustained ability to learn. These foods have been shown to interfere at almost any stage of the learning process, impeding our attempts to focus our attention, observe, ponder, remember, understand, and apply that understanding. Grains can alter learning capacities in four specific ways: as sequelae of untreated celiac disease; through an immune sensitivity to gluten; through dietary displacement of other nutrients and; through the impact of grain on blood sugar/insulin levels. There are many reports of learning problems in association with untreated celiac disease. A majority of children with celiac disease display the signs and symptoms of attention deficit disorder (ADD/ADHD)1, 2 a range of learning difficulties3 and developmental delays4-6. Many of the same problems are found more frequently among those with gluten sensitivity7 a condition signaled by immune reactions against this most common element of the modern diet. Grain consumption can also cause specific nutrient deficiencies that are known to play an important role in learning. Grains can also cause problems with blood sugar/insulin levels resulting in reduced capacities for learning. Further, foods derived from grain are an important element in the current epidemic of hypoglycemia, obesity, and Type 2 diabetes8-10. Our growing understanding of the biological impact of cereal grain consumption must move educators to challenge current dietary trends. Part of our improved understanding comes from new testing protocols which are revealing that celiac sprue afflicts close to 1% of the general population, making it the most common life-long ailment among humans, with frequencies ranging from 0.5% to more than 5% of some populations11, 12. It is widespread and appears to occur more frequently among populations that have experienced relatively shorter periods of exposure to these grains13. The importance of this newly recognized high frequency of celiac disease becomes obvious when we examine the impact it has on learning and behavior. Research has identified ADHD in 66-70% of children with untreated celiac disease, which resolves on a gluten-free diet, and returns with a gluten challenge1, 2. Several investigators have connected particular patterns of reduced blood flow to specific parts of the brain in ADHD13-15. Other reports have connected untreated celiac disease with similarly abnormal blood flow patterns in the brain16. One might be able to dismiss such reports if viewed in isolation, but the increased rates of learning disabilities among celiac patients3, and the increased rates of celiac disease among those with learning disabilities leave little to the imagination17. Further, there is one report of gluten-induced aphasia (a condition characterized by the loss of speech ability) that resolved after diagnosis and institution of a gluten-free diet18. Still other investigations suggest a causal link between the partial digests of gluten (opioid peptides) and a variety of problems with learning, attention, and development. Gluten sensitivity, afflicting close to 15% of the general population19, 20 is an immune reaction to one or more proteins in found in grains. When a persons immune system has developed antibodies against any of these proteins, undigested and partly digested food particles have been allowed entry into the bloodstream21. The leakage of food proteins through the intestinal wall signals a failure of the protective, mucosal lining of the gastrointestinal tract, as is consistently found in untreated celiac disease. Many of the same health and learning problems that are found in celiac disease are significantly overrepresented among those with gluten sensitivity for the very good reason that many of the same proteins are being leaked into the blood of those with gluten sensitivity. Our cultural obeisance to grains is at odds with the remains of ancient humans. Archaeologists have long recognized that grains are a starvation food—one for which we are not well suited. Grains result in consistent signs of disease and malnourishment in every locale and epoch associated with human adoption of grain cultivation. Grains are a poverty food. As we increase our grain consumption, we cause deficiencies in other nutrients by overwhelming the absorptive and transport mechanisms at work in our intestines. For instance, diets dominated by grains have been shown to induce iron deficiency22—a condition that is widely recognized as causing learning disabilities23-29. This should not be surprising since iron is the carrier used to distribute oxygen throughout our bodies, including various regions of our brains. There is little room to dispute the hazards to learning posed by reductions in oxygen supply to the brain. Iron deficiency reduces available oxygen in the brain, revealing yet another dimension of gluten grains as mediators of learning difficulties. There is more. The impact of grain consumption on our blood sugar levels is yet another facet of its contribution to learning problems. We evolved as hunter-gatherers, eating meats, and complex carbohydrates in the form of fruits, vegetables, and seeds. Refined sugars were a rare treat wrested from bees with some difficulty. At best, it was a rare treat for our pre-historic ancestors. Today, with unprecedented agricultural/industrial production of refined sugars along with cultivation and milling of grain flours, these products have become very cheap and available, particularly over the last fifty years. During that time, we have added enormous quantities of grain-derived starches to the overwhelming quantities of sugar we consume. The result of this escalating dietary trend may be observed in the current epidemic rates of Type 2 diabetes, hypoglycemia, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. In the classroom, we see these trends manifest in students mood swings, behavioral disorders (fluctuating between extreme lethargy and hyperactivity), chronic depression, forgetfulness, and muddled thinking—all of which reflects the inordinate, counter-evolutionary burden placed on many homeostatic systems of the body, particularly those related to blood sugar regulation. The pancreas has many functions. One important activity of the pancreas is to stabilize blood sugar levels. When blood sugar is not well regulated, learning is impaired30. The pancreas secretes carefully monitored quantities of glucagon and insulin. The pancreas responds to the presence of proteins, sugar, and starch in the digestive tract by producing insulin. It produces glucagon in response to fats. The balanced presence of both of these hormones in the bloodstream is critical to learning because they regulate the transport of nutrients into cells. Too little or too much insulin can cause blood sugar levels go out of control inducing a wide range of symptoms. Today, when the insulin/glucagon balance goes awry, it is frequently due to insulin overproduction due to a diet dominated by sugars and starches. This overproduction is caused by chronic consumption of highly glycemic foods. The resulting elevated levels of insulin cause rapid movement of nutrients into cells, either for storage as fat, or to be burned as energy, causing increased activity levels, "hot spells", sweating, increased heart rate, etc. This energized stage requires a constant supply of sugars and starches to be maintained. Otherwise, it is soon followed by bouts of lethargy, light-headedness, tremors, and weakness, which are all signs of hypoglycemia or very low blood sugar levels. Despite having stored much of the blood sugars as fats, there is insufficient glucagon to facilitate its use for energy. As this condition progresses, and as blood sugar levels plummet, periods of irrational anger and/or confusion often result. These moods often result from adrenaline secreted to avoid a loss of consciousness due to low blood sugar levels. The next step in the progression, in the absence of appropriate nutritional intervention, is lapsing into a coma. In the short term, the answer to these fluctuations is more frequent consumption of sugars/starches. However, the long term result of such an approach is either a state of insulin resistance, where more and more insulin is required to do the same task, or a state of pancreatic insufficiency, where the pancreas is simply unable to keep pace with the demand for insulin. In either case, once this stage is reached, the individual may be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. This disease has so increased among North Americans, particularly among children, that an autoimmune form of diabetes, previously called juvenile onset, had to be renamed to "Type 1 diabetes". By now, it will not surprise the reader to learn that Type 1 diabetes has also been shown to be significantly associated with gluten. Research reveals that there is considerable overlap between celiac disease and Type 1 diabetes. About 8% of celiacs also have Type 1 diabetes31-33, and 5-11% of Type 1 diabetics have celiac disease34-38. Further, Scott Frazer et al. have repeatedly shown, in animal studies, a causal, dose-dependent relationship between type 1 diabetes and gluten39-42. The growing reaction against gluten and other allergenic foods should not be confused with the several dietary fads of the 20th Century. The vegetarian perspective ignores the vitamin deficiencies that result from a strict vegetarian diet. The low-fat craze is another fad that has mesmerized the industrialized world for the last 30-40 years. Fortunately, this perspective has recently come under scrutiny. Despite having served as the driving force behind most physicians dietary recommendations during the last several decades, the low fat dictum is overwhelmingly being discredited by research reported in peer reviewed publications. Recognition and avoidance of allergenic and highly glycemic foods is a whole new trend that is based on scientific research and evidence. It reflects an improved understanding of the function of the gastrointestinal tract, the endocrine system, particularly the pancreas, and the immune system. Past dietary fads are consistently deficient in important nutrients that are necessary to our good health and survival. Further, they frequently contain substances that are harmful to us, such as the phytates that are abundantly present in whole grain foods, and interfere with absorption of many minerals. It is increasingly clear that grains, especially those that contain gluten, are contraindicated for human learning. The evidence is overwhelming. The mandate of eating to learn is learning to eat as our ancestors did. Ron Hoggan is an author, teacher and diagnosed celiac who lives in Canada. His book "Dangerous Grains" can be ordered here. References: Kozlowska, Z: (1991). Results of investigation on children with coeliakia treated many years with glutethen free diet Psychiatria Polska. 25(2),130-134. Paul, K., Todt, J., Eysold, R. (1985) [EEG Research Findings in Children with Celiac Disease According to Dietary Variations]. Zeitschrift der Klinische Medizin. 40, 707-709. Grech, P.L., Richards, J., McLaren, S., Winkelman, J.H. (2000) Psychological sequelae and quality of life in celiac disease. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition 31(3): S4 Reichelt, K., Sagedal, E., Landmark, J., Sangvic, B., Eggen, O., Helge, S. (1990a). The Effect of Gluten-Free Diet on Urinary peptide Excretion and Clinical State in Schizophrenia. Journal of Orthomolecular Medicine. 5(4), 169-181. Reichelt, K., Ekrem, J., Scott, H. (1990b). Gluten, Milk Proteins and Autism: DIETARY INTERVENTION EFFECTS ON BEHAVIOR AND PEPTIDE SECRETION. Journal of Applied Nutrition. 42(1), 1-11. Reichelt, K., Knivsberg, A., Lind, G., Nodland, M. (1991). Probable etiology and Possible Treatment of Childhood Autism. Brain Dysfunction. 4, 308-319. Hoggan, R. (1997a). Absolutisms Hidden Message for Medical Scientism. Interchange. 28(2/3), 183-189. Caterson ID, Gill TP. Obesity: epidemiology and possible prevention. Best Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2002 Dec;16(4):595-610. Hennessy AR, Walker JD.Silent hypoglycaemia at the diabetic clinic. Diabet Med. 2002 Mar;19(3):261. Kue Young T, Chateau D, Zhang M. Factor analysis of ethnic variation in the multiple metabolic (insulin resistance) syndrome in three Canadian populations.Am J Human Biol. 2002 Sep-Oct;14(5):649-58. Wahab PJ, Meijer JW, Dumitra D, Goerres MS, Mulder CJ. Coeliac disease: more than villous atrophy.Rom J Gastroenterol. 2002 Jun;11(2):121-7. Catassi C, Ratsch IM, Gandolfi L, Pratesi R, Fabiani E, El Asmar R, Frijia M, Bearzi I, Vizzoni L. Why is coeliac disease endemic in the people of the Sahara?Lancet. 1999 Aug 21;354(9179):647-8. Langleben DD, Acton PD, Austin G, Elman I, Krikorian G, Monterosso JR, Portnoy O, Ridlehuber HW, Strauss HW. Effects of Methylphenidate Discontinuation on Cerebral Blood Flow in Prepubescent Boys with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.J Nucl Med. 2002 Dec;43(12):1624-1629. 2: Kim BN, Lee JS, Shin MS, Cho SC, Lee DS. Regional cerebral perfusion abnormalities in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder Statistical parametric mapping analysis. Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2002 Oct;252(5):219-25. Lou, H., Henriksen, L., Bruhn, P. (1984). Focal cerebral hypoperfusion in children with dysphasia and/or attention deficit disorder. Archives of Neurology. 825-829. De Santis A, Addolorato G, Romito A, Caputo S, Giordano A, Gambassi G, Taranto C, Manna R, Gasbarrini G. Schizophrenic symptoms and SPECT abnormalities in a coeliac patient: regression after a gluten-free diet. J Intern Med. 1997 Nov;242(5):421-3. Knivsberg AM. Urine patterns, peptide levels and IgA/IgG antibodies to food proteins in children with dyslexia.Pediatr Rehabil. 1997 Jan-Mar;1(1):25-33. Case records of the Massachusetts General Hospital. Weekly clinicopathological exercises. Case 43-1988. A 52-year-old man with persistent watery diarrhea and aphasia.N Engl J Med. 1988 Oct 27;319(17):1139-48. Hadjivassiliou M, Boscolo S, Davies-Jones GA, Grunewald RA, Not T, Sanders DS, Simpson JE, Tongiorgi E, Williamson CA, Woodroofe NM. The humoral response in the pathogenesis of gluten ataxia. Neurology. 2002 Apr 23;58(8):1221-6. Hadjivassiliou M, Grunewald RA, Davies-Jones GA. Gluten sensitivity as a neurological illness.J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2002 May;72(5):560-3. Review. Husby, V., Jensenius, C., Svehag, S.(1985). Passage of Undegraded DietaryAntigen into the Blood of Healthy Adults. Scandinavian Journal of Immunology. 22, 83-92. Ma A, Chen X, Zheng M, Wang Y, Xu R, Li J. Iron status and dietary intake of Chinese pregnant women with anemia in the third trimester. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2002;11(3):171-5. Kapil U, Bhavna A. Adverse effects of poor micronutrient status during childhood and adolescence. Nutr Rev. 2002 May;60(5 Pt 2):S84-90. Review. Youdim MB, Yehuda S. The neurochemical basis of cognitive deficits induced by brain iron deficiency: involvement of dopamine-opiate system. Cell Mol Biol (Noisy-le-grand). 2000 May;46(3):491-500. Otero GA, Aguirre DM, Porcayo R, Fernandez T. Psychological and electroencephalographic study in school children with iron deficiency. Int J Neurosci. 1999 Aug;99(1-4):113-21. Guesry P. The role of nutrition in brain development. Prev Med. 1998 Mar-Apr;27(2):189-94. Review. Bruner AB, Joffe A, Duggan AK, Casella JF, Brandt J. Randomised study of cognitive effects of iron supplementation in non-anaemic iron-deficient adolescent girls. Lancet. 1996 Oct 12;348(9033):992-6. Soewondo S. The effect of iron deficiency and mental stimulation on Indonesian childrens cognitive performance and development. Kobe J Med Sci. 1995 Apr;41(1-2):1-17. McCarthy AM, Lindgren S, Mengeling MA, Tsalikian E, Engvall JC. Effects of diabetes on learning in children. Pediatrics. 2002 Jan;109(1):E9. Bertini M, Sbarbati A, Valletta E, Pinelli L, Tato L. Incomplete gastric metaplasia in children with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and celiac disease. An ultrastructural study.BMC Clin Pathol. 2001;1(1):2. Schuppan D, Hahn EG. Celiac disease and its link to type 1 diabetes mellitus.J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab. 2001;14 Suppl 1:597-605. Holmes GK. Coeliac disease and Type 1 diabetes mellitus - the case for screening.Diabet Med. 2001 Mar;18(3):169-77. x Saukkonen T, Vaisanen S, Akerblom HK, Savilahti E. Coeliac disease in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes: a study of growth, glycaemic control, and experiences of families.Acta Paediatr. 2002;91(3):297-302. Spiekerkoetter U, Seissler J, Wendel U. General Screening for Celiac Disease is Advisable in Children with Type 1 Diabetes.Horm Metab Res. 2002 Apr;34(4):192-5. Barera G, Bonfanti R, Viscardi M, Bazzigaluppi E, Calori G, Meschi F, Bianchi C, Chiumello G. Occurrence of celiac disease after onset of type 1 diabetes: a 6-year prospective longitudinal study.Pediatrics. 2002 May;109(5):833-8. Hansen D, Bennedbaek FN, Hansen LK, Hoier-Madsen M, Hegedu LS, Jacobsen BB, Husby S. High prevalence of coeliac disease in Danish children with type I diabetes mellitus.Acta Paediatr. 2001 Nov;90(11):1238-43. Aktay AN, Lee PC, Kumar V, Parton E, Wyatt DT, Werlin SL. The prevalence and clinical characteristics of celiac disease in juvenile diabetes in Wisconsin.J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2001 Oct;33(4):462-5. MacFarlane AJ, Burghardt KM, Kelly J, Simell T, Simell O, Altosaar I, Scott FW. A type 1 diabetes-related protein from wheat (triticum aestivum): cDNA clone of a wheat storage globulin, Glb1, linked to islet damage.J Biol Chem. 2002 Oct 29. Scott FW, Rowsell P, Wang GS, Burghardt K, Kolb H, Flohe S. Oral exposure to diabetes-promoting food or immunomodulators in neonates alters gut cytokines and diabetes.Diabetes. 2002 Jan;51(1):73-8. Scott FW, Cloutier HE, Kleemann R, Woerz-Pagenstert U, Rowsell P, Modler HW, Kolb H. Potential mechanisms by which certain foods promote or inhibit the development of spontaneous diabetes in BB rats: dose, timing, early effect on islet area, and switch in infiltrate from Th1 to Th2 cells.Diabetes. 1997 Apr;46(4):589-98. Scott FW. Food-induced type 1 diabetes in the BB rat.Diabetes Metab Rev. 1996 Dec;12(4):341-59. Of Relevant interest: Gormanous M, Hunt A, Pope J, Gerald B. Lack of knowledge of diabetes among Arkansas public elementary teachers: implications for dietitians. J Am Diet Assoc. 2002 Aug;102(8):1136-8.
  18. Celiac.com 05/30/2007 - The results of a study recently published in the Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology shows that patients with celiac disease can consume oats with no risk of adverse immunological effects. An international research team made up of doctors Tarja Kemppainen (1); Esko Janatuinen (2); Kati Holm (3); Veli-Matti Kosma (4); Markku Heikkinen (5); Markku Mäki (3); Kaija Laurila (3); Matti Uusitupa (1); Risto Julkunen (5), set out to evaluate local cellular immune response after 5 years of oat consumption by adult celiac patients. The doctors looked at a group of 42 celiac patients who had previously participated in a 6-12 month oats intervention study. 22 of these patients already incorporated oats as part of their gluten-free diet. During the 5-year follow-up study, 10 patients who were concerned about the safety of long-term oat consumption stopped eating oats. The 12 remaining patients consumed oats for the whole 5-year period. The remaining 20 celiac patients formed the control group, and followed a strict, conventional, gluten-free diet that excluded oats. The team conducted biopsies and counted Intraepithelial CD3, TCR (IEL) and TCR (IEL) T cells to determine corresponding densities. No Adverse Effects for Celiac Disease Patients Who Eat Oats The results showed no differences in the densities of CD3, IEL and IEL T cells between the oat and the control groups. The researchers concluded that the mucosa of the small intestine show no immunological response in celiac patients who consume oats over a long period of time. Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, Volume 42, Issue 1 2007 , pages 54 - 59 Participating Institutions: Department of Clinical Nutrition, University of Kuopio and Kuopio University Hospital. Kuopio. Finland Department of General Medicine, Al Mafraq Hospital. Abu Dhabi, U.A.E. Medical School, University of Tampere and Tampere University Hospital. Tampere. Finland Department of Pathology and Forensic Medicine, University of Kuopio and Kuopio University Hospital. Gastroenterological Unit, Department of Medicine, Kuopio University Hospital. Finland About the Author: Jefferson Adams is a freelance health writer who lives in San Francisco and is a frequent author of articles for Celiac.com.
  19. Celiac.com 05/20/2008 - I am going to be honest—I have not traveled outside the U.S.A. except for Mexico and Canada. When I went to Mexico it was on a cruise ship, so that meant I could eat on the ship. I would take snacks to tide me over or get a bag of chips. Hopefully I will one day be able to tour the world and educate everyone on how to make true gluten-free meals for all of us. I also hope that my when the time is right I will go on such trips with my loving wife. So I will tell you how I would approach a trip to another country and you can decide if this is worth a try. Planning for the Trip (All per emails and internet and phone calls) I would contact the area chamber of commerce or tourist office in the country that I will be going to and see if they have heard of the gluten-free diet or celiac disease. If I was staying at a hotel or resort I would ask them to look into gluten-free meals and if they have a kitchen where I could talk with the executive chef or manager of food and beverages. I would also tell them that I am a chef from the U.S.A. I would go to celiac.com to locate the nearest celiac support group to where I will be staying. If there is one I would find out about local spots that I might be able to visit to get gluten-free meals, and if there are any bake shops or natural food stores where I could get some supplies and snacks. I would find a book on the languages that they speak and make a chef Daniel restaurant form so I could eat in a restaurant. I would have it in all the languages including English for the chef to make sure they understand I am very serous about my health. I would have a card that said “May I speak to the manager and I have a special diet request.” Hopeful I could say that in their language. I would have a gluten-free restaurant card in their language and present it to the chef or manager. I would have a safe and forbidden list in the language where I was visiting. That way I could check foods from the store so I could eat snacks. I would try to stay at a place with a microwave and possibly a refrigerator. By doing this if I ran into a language problem I could cook chicken or meats in the microwave (I have cooked whole chickens in a microwave on vacation before and put it in the refrigerator for later). I would carry cards with me to ask for directions or to ask a wait staff for something I might be able to eat. Like maybe some cheese, beverage, snacks or any type food of the area that I might like. If you were at a port on the ocean your card could be sauté seafood and with olive oil. Even if I didn’t look at the menu I would know that because I am at a town on the water, they would have fresh fish coming in. If any of you watch the Travel Channel you know that there are a lot of different types of foods. Being a chef I would want to experience all types of different foods. If I knew something about the local cuisine and how it is prepared before I got there, it could give me an advantage. In Hong Kong I would love to eat some of the hot foods. Could I eat them? Is it just the chilies or is it the sauce? Those are some of the questions I would wonder, so I would research the area and review cookbooks to see how they prepare their foods. If I knew where I would be traveling I would try to contact a local restaurant beforehand to see if I could view their menu for the time when I would be visiting. If I did this, I could make my Chef Daniel restaurant form up ahead of the visit. I would make sure that when I was at my vacation spot I could get Internet access. By doing this I could look up restaurants that I see when I am walking around to see if their menus were available online. Also I would be able to translate a chef Daniel P restaurant form for that place if we decide to go there. I would make sure that I had a phone with internet access to look up info at any time. Also with the phone I could translate a sentence with a Web site I know about. As you see I have put a great deal of thought into traveling, but not one of them has been tested. I wish I could say that these ideas all worked for me and they will for you too. My thought is that the greatest asset for us celiacs is the Chef Daniel P restaurant form you take into the restaurant.I would have every direction I could give on paper for the chef to see. When I was cooking I cooked with chefs from around the world. We all had the same common cause: To make our customers happy so they will spread the word and come again. So to me it doesn’t matter if they can read English or Spanish. It comes down to me as the customer to tell them I have to have a gluten-free meal. To tell them that if they don’t do as I ask, I could get very sick and it would be their fault, and no restaurant wants to hear that their food caused a person to get sick. If you are like me, you are going to want to taste some of the home town small restaurants. I would know the area as mentioned before, and find out about any fresh vegetables or meats that I would like to try. On my phone I would access the Internet and I would find information on the town I was in. When I walked in I would ask for a manager, and if that person doesn’t speak English I would get one of my restaurant cards out to let them read what I am trying to say. I also would try to read the card out so they could see that I am trying very hard to speak their language. I believe that shows I am not a stuck up rich person who hires everyone to do what I want. If I mess it up, I would feel it is okay as long as I look like I am trying to commutate to them “I am very serous about my health.” Asking them questions would be hard but I would have cards with questions on them and I would know what yes or no sound like. If it was a small café I would ask to talk with the chef. At least try to speak through my cards and being a chef I usually have no trouble seeing the kitchen. It is an advantage to be a chef from a very popular resort that is known world wide and I would use that to my advantage. Even if they never knew of me, I know my way around the kitchen and I would be able to look around to see if I could eat there. I would look to see: Is it dirty or clean? Does it look like they cut everything on the same cutting board? Does the cook look very sloppy? Even if I don’t go to the back where the kitchen is, the dinning room represents the kitchen too. I am not expecting a clean perfect kitchen. I am expecting the cook who might be this little old lady who has had this restaurant in her family for four generations to care about me. That is what all restaurants usually want—if they care about their customers they will survive for years and years. It is a hospitality business in America or in Russia—and it doesn’t matter what you language you speak. That is when you don’t have to worry so much about the Gluten Monster.I would be honored to walk into some of these smaller kitchens of the world and find out about their history and who they have cooked for. Just thinking about it gets me all wiggly in side. You can tell a lot about a restaurant when you walk in—if you only take the time to notice. So when you plan your vacation as a celiac you need to keep this in mind: It is just like over here and it will take you some time to order and eat. If you are in a hurry, I suggest that you take your safe and forbidden lists to the store and get some snacks. If you have the time you need to sit and relax and take a stab at eating restaurant food from another country. Chef Daniel P.
  20. Celiac.com 06/03/2008 - As you travel and experience the sites of the world you are going to have to stop at a restaurant or destination that has a small kitchen. Let me tell you a little bit about myself so you can understand that I also started in a small kitchen. Chef Daniel P's Autobiography I started working at the age of 13 and began my work in a very small tourist town and was promoted up from busboy to dishwasher. I was so fast at washing the dishes that I was promoted up within a month to cook. I went from the buffet type restaurant to an ala cart restaurant and buffet line. At the age of 17 I was completely in charge of the kitchen—this included all ordering, menu making, staff hiring and firing, and every task a person would do to run a successful kitchen. I didn’t know how to cook though—at least not compared to what I learned later. Yes I could do the basic menus but I wanted more and I left to climb the ladder of a big kitchen—so I set my sites on gourmet food. At that time I saw that Prince Charles from England was visiting Palm Beach Florida. I saw that he visited two places while he was in Palm Beach—the Palm Beach Polo Ground and he also visited the Breakers Resort. I applied at both places when I came to Florida and both wanted to hire me. Every one has to start somewhere and you as the traveler are the ones who are going to train the future cooks or chefs. Yes you—the cook is going to learn from you as celiac patrons, so you need to do the right training. Let’s use the example of eating on a train that cooks for their patrons as they travel across the country. I like to think of a small boat or train as two of the most difficult places to prepare a gluten-free meal. They both are going to be small, and both have the potential to get bumpy while the cook is preparing food. This means there is a good chance an accident can happen and of course cross-contamination. These kitchens probably keep their fires contained in the stove or flat top burners. By keeping the flame for cooking contained in a box, this means they have less chance of a fire starting and that is very important if you are on a river or going down the train tracks. The cooks are going to use sauté pans, hard top grills, ovens, steam boxes and possibly microwaves. If you know that you are going ahead of time to these types of restaurants you should see if they can send you the menu ahead of time so that you can look it over. Hint: If you know your destination for any of your trip, see if you can get the menu before you arrive, as most places always have their menus prepared ahead of time. If you get the menu you can make up your Chef Daniel P Restaurant Form before you go. I would try to spell out your entire meal in great detail. I also use this technique for all mom and pop restaurants. You are not insulting a cook or chef by asking them to prepare your meal a certain way. Every day the cook receives orders from the waitress on how to prepare a particular meal. Just because you are giving the instructions yourself only means to the chef that you are very serious about how your food is prepared. What to Eat And How to Cook Your Meal In these type of restaurants that are small and have limited space you have to try to eliminate any mistakes that the cook might make. How…you ask? Try some of these ideas: Notify them ahead a time if you can. Let the train, boat or any restaurant know that you are coming. Make sure you tell them the date, time and how many people will be receiving special meals. Don’t be upset if you get there and no one knows that you are coming, it is just part of the business. Have their phone number available so when you arrive in the city you can call a few hours before you arrive to eat. Just remind them again that you are planning on eating at their restaurant and ask them when their slowest time is. If it is a train or boat ask if you can eat at the last seating time (unless they indicate that an earlier time is slower). Feel them out to see when the best time is for you to order a specially prepared meal. During your phone call, ask who you should ask for when you do arrive for your meal. Make sure you arrive with your Chef Daniel P Restaurant Form and a pen or pencil. When you arrive ask for the manager or the person you talked to on the phone. Tell the manager in great detail about your special diet request. Let them know you will be writing out your request that will specifically tell them how to prepare your meal. Ask if there is anything you should know about the kitchen or the chef—anything that could help you in preparing your meal and making it as safe as possible. You might have to ask the manager how they cook their food. Some are going to use a flat-top grill, broiler, steamer or even a microwave oven. Once you find this out it is time to create your meal instructions and present them to the manager so he can deliver them to the cook.How the Cook Prepares Your Food: Sautéing: To me is one of the safest ways to have your food prepared. No matter if the cooks are in a small or large kitchen. This is how I might write it down for the cook to see: “Sauté 1 whole chicken breast in olive oil, make sure the pan is very clean and does not have a crumb on it.” When asking to sauté you can ask for them to make a quick sauce in the pan. That is what I do, even if it is just to squeeze a lemon on your food, this can add some fresh flavor. Hard Top Grill: I don’t recommend using this unless you are the very first ones to arrive. During the day when they cook on the grill pieces of food stay on the grill for the whole day. You can ask them to use the razor blade to scrape the grill. Even using the razor blade it is not 100% and food from other meals may get on your food. Steamer: This is a good way to cook as long as your food is the only one in the steamer. You can ask them to wrap the food and this will keep all crumbs off of your food. Example: “Please wrap a piece of salmon up with some saran wrap. Place it on a holey pan so the steam can circle salmon." Microwave: This is great for potatoes or vegetables and a good way to keep food safe. I always ask for my veggies to be micro-waved. This is a great way to get a baked potato. Even some fish and other entrees can be cooked in the microwave. Example: “Could you please cook a potato and my vegetables in the microwave. Put them in a dish then cover with saran wrap.” Fryer: You must stay away from a fryer in small kitchens (unlike fast food chains and some bigger restaurants). They use the fryer for everything and that means that everything could be in it. When they cook your French fries, the crumbs from the chicken nuggets could get on your food. Boiling: This is another great way to cook food. You must ask them to only cover the food product that they are cooking. Some fishes, vegetables and other meats can be cooked this way. If they have a steamer I would ask for that first since they don’t have to wait for it to get hot. Example: “I would like two eggs boiled or poached in just enough water to cover the entrée so it won’t take so long. You could have the cook put a small amount of water then cover the pan and steam it.” Broiler: Sometimes small kitchens that are moving are not going to have a broiler. It is the fear of the open fire that could cause a fire in the kitchen. If they do have one you could ask for this example: “I would like a piece of salmon on a metal plate. Cook it until it is done, then splash it with white wine before plating.” The main idea you take into small kitchens is this: It is a lot like cooking at your home (unless you have a huge kitchen). Those kitchens are made small but can put out large amount of meals if needed. Those menus are made to accommodate the small amount of storage also. You need to really know your menu and the ingredients they are using. Unlike a large kitchen you might not have the extra supplies that a big kitchen has. They just don’t have the room and you need to think of that. So if it is a river boat or a train, when you look at the menu some of the items will be canned products, because canned products are so much easier to store than refrigerated items. As you look at the menu take the item you would like and ask them if they can cook it in a sauté pan or maybe in the oven. This is a very safe way to have your food prepared. When I was employed at the resort and we would often have banquets for over 200 people. If the meal was New York strip steak we would put the steaks on the broiler and mark the diamond char marks in order to get the steaks cooked exactly at the same time. We would then pull the steaks off and put them on large sheet pans. Just before we needed the steak, we would put them in the ovens and cook them until they were the proper temperature. The customers never knew that the steaks were cooked in the oven and not the broiler. The char marks on the steak made everyone believe that it was broiled. The point is that you can have your food baked as long as you don’t get sick—for me that is the most important thing. When I do eat out, I don’t care too much about the taste or temperature of the meal—my number one goal is that I get a gluten-free meal and that the restaurant doesn’t ruin my vacation. Also, you have to be very careful when you send your food back. Just remember how busy the cooks are and whether or not they are going to remember your specially ordered meal when it comes back to them. If they are busy in the back and the waitress says to the cook, “Cook it more,” what do you think happens—will they take as much time as they did the first time? These are the types of questions that you have to ask yourself when you are sitting at your table and thinking about sending your meal back. I know that we all expect a perfect meal when we pay for it. Sometimes it is just easier to ask them to only warm it up in the microwave. Something to think about is that the microwave is like a closed room where it is not likely that your food will get contaminated. Most kitchens, especially smaller ones, have a microwave like the one that you use at home. If you do need your meal cooked more, try to explain it to the manager and remind him that you will get very sick if it gets contaminated—ask the manager nicely if you can watch and see if the cook does it right. Another thing to remember when you are eating in these types of restaurants is that they are small and that means the kitchens are small too. The cooks are going to be right next to each other—only arms and shoulders apart. Remember; if you don’t think they will be able to feed you properly always have a plan B, so you can still eat. Plan your meal to be as simple as possible for them to prepare and you will be able to conquer the Gluten Monster and have a wonderful train or boat experience! Chef Daniel P.
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