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Found 7 results

  1. Celiac.com 08/21/2014 - It’s official! Since August 5th, 2014, all packaged foods sold in the U.S must comply with new federal rules for labeling foods as "gluten-free." That means that all packaged food claiming to be "gluten-free" must contain less than 20 parts per million (ppm) of gluten. The FDA finalized the rule in August 2013, and gave food manufacturers one year to comply. The rule went into full effect on August 5, 2014. The new standard applies equally to all products labelled “gluten free,” “no gluten,” “without gluten,” and “free of gluten.” Until this rule went into effect, many food and product manufacturers were applying the term ‘gluten-free’ in myriad ways, some questionable. Moreover, consumers needing gluten-free food for medical reasons had no good way to know if the label was accurate, or if the food posed a potential risk to their health. Currently, the new gluten-free standard applies all foods and dietary supplements regulated by the FDA. The rule, however, does not apply to most alcoholic beverages, cosmetics, prescription and non-prescription drugs, pet food, or to foods regulated by the USDA, such as meat or poultry.
  2. Authors: Mautalen, Carlos, M.D. et al. Source: The American Journal of Gastroenterology, February, 1997, p. 313-318. In evaluating 14 newly diagnosed adult celiac patients who had been on a gluten-free diet (7 consumed the diet plus calcium at 1 gm. per day and vitamin D2 at 32,000I.U. given weekly compared to 7 diet only subjects) for 12 months, gluten restriction increased overall bone mass 5% in the lumbar spine and 5% in the total skeleton. When considering the 11 patients who strictly followed the gluten-restriction, bone density increased 8.4% in the lumbar spine and 7.7% in the total skeleton. The remineralization of patients treated with diet only was similar to that of patients treated with diet and supplements.
  3. Celiac.com 09/19/2012 - Researchers have documented rising rates of celiac disease in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). A research team recently tried to assess the effect of celiac disease on growth and glycemic control in patients with T1D, and to determine the effects of a gluten-free diet on these parameters. The research team included I. Taler, M. Phillip, Y. Lebenthal, L. de Vries, R. Shamir, and S. Shalitin. They are affiliated with the Department of Pediatrics B, Schneider Children's Medical Center of Israel in Petach Tikva, Israel. To do so, they conducted a longitudinal retrospective case-control study, in which they reviewed the medical data on 68 patients with T1D and duodenal-biopsy-confirmed celiac disease. They looked at weight, height, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), frequency of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), and severe hypoglycemic events before and after diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease. They then compared their findings with 131 patients with T1D alone, who were all matched for age, gender, and duration of diabetes. In all, 5.5% patients with T1D who attended the center during the study period were diagnosed with celiac disease, while 26% of the patients with celiac disease were symptomatic. The data showed no significant differences in glycemic control or frequency of severe hypoglycemia or DKA events between the study group and control subjects. Body mass index-standard deviation score (SDS), height-SDS, and HbA1c values were insignificantly higher in the control group than in the study group, and similar in celiac disease patients with good or fair/poor adherence to a gluten-free diet during follow-up. Patients with T1D and celiac disease and following a gluten-free diet have growth and metabolic control similar to those with T1D with no celiac disease. To determine whether a gluten-free diet is appropriate for asymptomatic celiac patients or only symptomatic patients must be assessed against possible short- and long-term consequences of no intervention, and the decision should be based on more evidence from larger randomized studies. Source: Pediatr Diabetes. 2012 May 7. doi: 10.1111/j.1399-5448.2012.00878.x.
  4. Celiac.com 11/28/2011 - Celiac disease often results in "leaky" intestinal mucosa. This development may involve changes in hydrophobicity of the mucus surface barrier along with changes of the epithelial barrier. A team of researchers recently compared bio-physical aspects of gastrointestinal mucosa of celiac patients with control subjects, along with the effects of gluten free diet on each group. The research team included Stefania Bertolazzi, Francesco Lanzarotto, Barbara Zanini, Chiara Ricci, Vincenzo Villanacci, and Alberto Lanzini. The team set out to compare duodenal hydrophobicity as an index of mucus barrier integrity in 38 patients studied before and 68 patients during gluten-free diet, and in 90 control subjects. They also checked for regional differences of hydrophobicity in the gastro-intestinal tract. The team gauged hydrophobicity by measuring the contact angle (CA) (Rame Hart 100/10 goniometer) created by a single drop of water applied to intestinal mucosal biopsies. Once the team pooled the results and evaluated the control groups, patients with histologically normal duodenal biopsies showed significantly higher CA (620 + 90) than patients with biopsies showing Marsh 1-2 (580 + 100; p<0.02) and Marsh 3 lesions (570+ 100; p<0.02). Among the control group, the action sequence of hydrofobicity along the gastrointestinal tract follows the pattern: gastric antrum> corpus> rectum> duodenum> oesophagus> ileum. From these results, the team concludes that people with celiac disease experience reduced hydrophobicity of duodenal mucous layer, and a reduced ability to repel luminal contents. This may may contribute to the increased intestinal permeability seen in celiac disease. This change in hydrofobicity corresponds to the severity of the mucosal lesions in the patient, and is not completely reversed by gluten-free diet. Source: BMC Gastroenterology 2011, 11:119 doi:10.1186/1471-230X-11-119
  5. Holmes GK, Prior P, Lane MR, Pope D, Allan RN Gut 1989 Mar;30(3):333-8 Gastroenterology Unit, General Hospital, Birmingham. PMID: 2707633, UI: 89212172 Two hundred and ten patients with coeliac disease previously reported from this unit were reviewed at the end of 1985 after a further 11 years of follow up. The initial review at the end of 1974 could not demonstrate that a gluten free diet (GFD) prevented these complications, probably because the time on diet was relatively short. The same series has therefore been kept under surveillance with the particular aim of assessing the effects of diet on malignancy after a further prolonged follow up period. Twelve new cancers have occurred: of which one was a carcinoma of the esophagus and two lymphomas. Thirty nine cancers developed in 38 patients and of 69 deaths, 33 were the result of malignancy. A two-fold relative risk (RR) of cancer was found and was because of an increased risk of cancer of the mouth and pharynx (RR = 9.7, p less than 0.01, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.0-28.3), esophagus (RR = 12.3, p less than 0.01, CI = 2.5-36.5), and of non-Hodgkins lymphoma (RR = 42.7, p less than 0.001, CI = 19.6-81.4). The results indicate that for coeliac patients who have taken a GFD for five years or more the risk of developing cancer over all sites is not increased when compared with the general population.
  6. Author: Bardella MT; Fraquelli M; Quatrini M; Molteni N; Bianchi P; Conte D Address: Cattedra di Gastroenterologia, Universit a degli Studi di Milano, IRCCS Ospedale Maggiore, Italy. Source: Hepatology, 1995 Sep, 22:3, 833-6 The prevalence of hypertransaminasemia and the effect of gluten-free diet (GFD) were evaluated in 158 consecutive adult celiac patients, 127 women and 31 men, aged 18 to 68 years (mean, 32). At diagnosis, 67 patients (42%) had raised aspartate and/or alanine transaminase levels (AST and ALT; mean, 47 IU/L, range, 30 to 190; and 61 IU/L, range, 25 to 470, respectively), whereas 91 patients had normal liver function tests (LFT). Patients with and without hypertransaminasemia were comparable for epidemiological data, body mass index (18.5 vs. 19.6), and severity of intestinal histological involvement. All patients were given a strict GFD and were followed for 1 to 10 years (median, 4). At 1 year, a highly significant improvement in intestinal histology was observed in both groups.
  7. Authors Rivabene R. Mancini E. De Vincenzi M. Source Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular Basis of Disease. 1453(1):152-160, 1999 Jan 6. Abstract: Coeliac disease (celiac disease) is an inflammatory disorder of the upper small intestine in which gluten acts as an essential factor in its pathogenesis. Although it is generally accepted that cereal protein activation of the immune system is involved in celiac disease progression, a non-immunomediated cytotoxic activity of gliadin-derived peptides on the jejunal/duodenal tract cannot be excluded. In this work, considering that (a) little has been reported about the intracellular metabolic events associated with gliadin toxicity, and ( an important role for free radicals in a number of gastrointestinal disease has been demonstrated, we investigated the in vitro effects of gliadin-derived peptides on redox metabolism of Caco-2 intestinal cells during a kinetic study in which cells were exposed to peptic-tryptic digest of bread wheal up to 48 h. We found that the antiproliferative effects displayed by gliadin exposure was associated with intracellular oxidative imbalance, characterized by an increased presence of lipid peroxides, an augmented oxidized (GSSC)/reduced (GSH) glutathione ratio and a loss in protein-bound sulfhydryl groups. Significant structural perturbations of the cell plasma membrane were also detected. Additional experiments performed by using the specific GSH-depleting agent buthionine sulfoximine provide evidence that the extent of gliadin-induced cell growth arrest critically depends upon the basal redox profile of the enterocytes. On the whole, these findings seem to suggest that, besides the adoption of a strictly gluten-free diet, the possibility for an adjuvant therapy with antioxidants may be considered for celiac disease patients. © 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. [References: 38]
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