Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'elderly'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forums

  • Diagnosis & Recovery, Related Disorders & Research
    • Calendar of Events
    • Celiac Disease Pre-Diagnosis, Testing & Symptoms
    • Post Diagnosis, Recovery & Treatment of Celiac Disease
    • Related Disorders & Celiac Research
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis
    • Gluten Sensitivity and Behavior
  • Support & Help
    • Coping with Celiac Disease
    • Publications & Publicity
    • Parents' Corner
    • Gab/Chat Room
    • Doctors Treating Celiac Disease
    • Teenagers & Young Adults Only
    • Pregnancy
    • Friends and Loved Ones of Celiacs
    • Meeting Room
    • Celiac Disease & Sleep
    • Celiac Support Groups
  • Gluten-Free Lifestyle
    • Gluten-Free Foods, Products, Shopping & Medications
    • Gluten-Free Recipes & Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Restaurants
    • Ingredients & Food Labeling Issues
    • Traveling with Celiac Disease
    • Weight Issues & Celiac Disease
    • International Room (Outside USA)
    • Sports and Fitness
  • When A Gluten-Free Diet Just Isn't Enough
    • Food Intolerance & Leaky Gut
    • Super Sensitive People
    • Alternative Diets
  • Forum Technical Assistance
    • Board/Forum Technical Help
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Events
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Groups/Organizations in the DFW area

Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Celiac.com Sponsors
  • Celiac Disease
  • Safe Gluten-Free Food List / Unsafe Foods & Ingredients
  • Gluten-Free Food & Product Reviews
  • Gluten-Free Recipes
    • Recipes by Continent / Country
    • Biscuits, Rolls & Buns (Gluten-Free Recipes)
    • Noodles & Dumplings (Gluten-Free Recipes)
    • Dessert Recipes: Gluten-Free Pastries, Cakes, Cookies, etc.
    • Bread Recipes (Gluten-Free)
    • Flour Mixes (Gluten-Free)
    • Kids Recipes (Gluten-Free)
    • Snacks & Appetizers (Gluten-Free Recipes)
    • Muffins (Gluten-Free Recipes)
    • Pancakes (Gluten-Free Recipes)
    • Pizzas & Pizza Crusts (Gluten-Free Recipes)
    • Soups, Sauces, Dressings & Chowders (Gluten-Free Recipes)
    • Cooking Tips
    • Scones (Gluten-Free Recipes)
    • Waffles (Gluten-Free Recipes)
  • Celiac Disease Diagnosis, Testing & Treatment
  • Celiac Disease & Gluten Intolerance Research
  • Miscellaneous Information on Celiac Disease
    • Additional Celiac Disease Concerns
    • Celiac Disease Research Projects, Fundraising, Epidemiology, Etc.
    • Conferences, Publicity, Pregnancy, Church, Bread Machines, Distillation & Beer
    • Gluten-Free Diet, Celiac Disease & Codex Alimentarius Wheat Starch
    • Gluten-Free Food Ingredient Labeling Regulations
    • Celiac.com Podcast Edition
  • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity
  • Celiac Disease & Related Diseases and Disorders
  • Origins of Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Grains and Flours
  • Oats and Celiac Disease: Are They Gluten-Free?
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Celiac Disease Support Groups
  • Celiac Disease Doctor Listing
  • Kids and Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Travel
  • Gluten-Free Cooking
  • Gluten-Free
  • Allergy vs. Intolerance
  • Tax Deductions for Gluten-Free Food
  • Gluten-Free Newsletters & Magazines
  • Gluten-Free & Celiac Disease Links
  • History of Celiac.com

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Interests


Location


First Name


Last Name


City


State


Country


How did you hear about us?

Found 6 results

  1. Celiac.com 11/28/2016 - It's clear from research data that what was once thought to be a childhood disease can affect people well into adulthood and old age. A team of researchers recently set out to assess rates of celiac disease diagnosis in an elderly population, recording the main clinical features of this group respect to young patients. The research team included R. Tortora, F. Zingone, A. Rispo, C. Bucci, P. Capone, N. Imperatore, N. Caporaso, D. D'Agosto, and C. Ciacci. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery at the University "Federico II" of Naples in Napes, Italy, and with the Department of Gastroenterology at the University of Salerno in Salerno, Italy. They conducted a retrospective analysis of celiac disease rates in elderly individuals from 1970 to 2015. They divided patients by age into three groups. Group A included patients 18-34 years old. Group B included patients 35-64 years old. Group C included patients 65 years or older. The team then compared the groups regarding baseline anthropometric and serological variables, clinical features at diagnosis, diagnostic mode, associated autoimmune diseases, and celiac-related neoplastic complications. They made a total of 2,812 celiac disease diagnoses in adults, 2.5% of which occurred in patients 65 years or older at diagnosis. When comparing the three groups, they found no differences in sex, haemoglobin, serum iron, albumin, and anti-tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG) (p = NS). They did find higher values of cholesterol, glycemia, and triglycerides in older patients (p < 0.0001). Elderly had higher rates of diagnosis for malabsorption symptoms compared to younger patients (OR 2.20, 95%CI 1.3-3.74). The team also found no difference in the risk of autoimmune celiac-related diseases between groups. The researchers found 16 neoplastic complications, 13 of them in patients diagnosed with celiac disease between 35-64 years of age. The number of celiac disease diagnoses increased over time, particularly in elderly. These results show that celiac disease diagnosis in the elderly population is uncommon, but not rare. Elderly celiac patients face a greater risk of being diagnosed with malabsorption symptoms than younger patients, but with a lowr risk of autoimmune and neoplastic complications. Source: Scand J Gastroenterol. 2016 Oct;51(10):1179-83. doi: 10.1080/00365521.2016.1186222. Epub 2016 May 31.
  2. Celiac.com 09/28/2016 - Celiac disease occurs most often in children and young adults. However, people can develop celiac disease at any age, and rates are rising even among older people. Because older people often show clinically atypical symptoms, they can sometimes experience a delay in diagnosis. Also, serological tests have a lower sensitivity and specificity in the older patients. This means that doctors only begin to suspect celiac disease in the presence of other, often vaguely associated complications, such as autoimmune disorders, fractures, and finally, malignancy, and that diagnosis must be aided by endoscopic and imaging tools. A team of researchers recently set out to assess the incidence and prevalence of celiac disease in the elderly, the patterns of clinical presentation, diagnosis, and the most frequent complications, with the aim of increasing awareness and reducing the diagnostic delay of celiac disease even in the elderly population. The research team included Maria Cappello, Gaetano C. Morreale, and Anna Licata of the Gastroenterology and Hepatology Section, DIBIMIS, University of Palermo School of Medicine, Palermo, Italy. The team's recent article highlights their findings regarding celiac rates and incidence in older patients, along with patterns of clinical presentation, diagnosis, and most frequent complications. The researchers conclude: "Despite a paucity of symptoms, such as diarrhea and weight loss, celiac disease has been increasingly recognized in the elderly. Other presentations in the elderly age group include iron deficiency anemia (often refractory to oral iron), autoimmune disorders, bone disease due to osteopenia, including fractures, malignant intestinal disease, especially lymphoma, and finally idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. Diagnosis may be delayed due to limited symptoms, a low index of clinical suspicion, or diagnostic difficulties related to important cognitive impairment that often affects elderly people. Although for these patients, the GFD is the key of clinical management, elderly patients sometimes are scarcely adherent to diet. Patients should be referred to specialists to ensure the better management of the disease and related complications. Micronutrients, such as iron, calcium, vitamin D supplementation, and vitamins, should be part of a modified GFD for the elderly patients. All other therapeutical interventions that limit malabsorption and avoid complications should be considered part of a management strategy." Source: Clin Med Insights Gastroenterol. 2016; 9: 41–49. doi: 10.4137/CGast.S38454 PMCID: PMC4965017
  3. Celiac.com 02/13/2012 - Evidence from numerous epidemiological studies supports the idea that celiac disease is not a disease that largely affects children, but is actually a disease that can affect people of any age. Several recent studies suggested that a majority of patients are now diagnosed after age 50. Indeed, in one study, the median age at diagnosis was just short of age 50, with one-third of new patients diagnosed over the age of 65. A recent study in Finland found even a higher prevalence of biopsy-proven celiac disease (2.13%) in older people (52-74 years of age). Another recent study showed that celiac disease may truly occur for the first time in an elderly individual, despite a life-long apparent tolerance of gluten ingestion, not merely be diagnosed at this age. However, despite growing body of research on celiac disease, very little is known about this condition in older people. A research team set out to review the prevalence, clinical features, diagnosis and consequences of celiac disease in the elderly. The team included Shadi Rashtak, MD and Joseph A. Murray, MD, affiliated with the Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, and the Department of Dermatology at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Rochester, Minnesota They also reviewed data on treatment strategies for celiac disease, with emphasis on the particular nutritional and non-nutritional consequences or connections there may regarding celiac disease in the elderly. Part of the problem is that lack of awareness, coupled with more atypical symptoms in older celiac patients, as compared to the younger patients, can result in delayed diagnosis of celiac disease in this population which leads to higher morbidity and mortality in this group. Also, classic symptoms of celiac disease, such as diarrhea, weight loss and abdominal pain are less common in elderly celiac patients. Even though many elderly celiac patients do have abdominal symptoms, many have milder symptoms, such as abdominal bloating, flatulence, and abdominal discomfort, which make proper diagnosis more difficult. The team also notes that celiac disease is the most common cause of steatorrhea in people over 50 years of age, and the second most common cause in those over 65 years. Between 60% and 80% of older people with celiac disease suffer from anemia, which is largely attributed to a deficiency of micronutrients, mainly iron. The presence of other autoimmune diseases that are frequently associated with celiac disease may well offer important clues that can raise possibility of celiac disease in an elderly patient. For example, autoimmune thyroid disorders are commonly associated with autoimmune diseases in elderly celiac patients, with majority of patients suffering from hypothyroidism. Also, the risk of intestinal lymphoma and other celiac disease-associated malignancies is higher in older people. Occasionally, celiac disease may present with cavitation of mesenteric lymph nodes and splenic atrophy or with intestinal ulceration with or without underlying malignancy In the face of this data, the team is calling for improved awareness of the incidence and clinical presentation of celiac disease in the elderly to prevent delays in diagnosis. Even though treatment for celiac disease is pretty basic, the elderly may face individual treatment challenges, especially with regard to making radical dietary changes, and also in coping with the difficulties of chronic nutritional absorption problems. The researchers feel that a comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach to treating celiac disease should reduce patient deaths related to celiac disease, and emphasize that a treatment approach tailored to the individual challenges of each elderly celiac patients is the key to success. Source: Gastroenterol Clin North Am. 2009 September ; 38(3): 433–446. doi:10.1016/j.gtc.2009.06.005.
  4. Celiac.com 03/12/2010 - A team of researchers recently noted similar presentations of celiac disease in both elder and younger patients.The research team included Rupa Mukherjee, Ikenna Egbuna, Pardeep Brar, Lincoln Hernandez, Donald J. McMahon, Elizabeth J. Shane, Govind Bhagat, and Peter H. R. Green. They are affiliated variously with the Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases, the Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, and the Department of Pathology at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York, and with Columbia University Medical Center's Celiac Disease Center. It is well known that celiac disease can affect individuals of all ages. However, there have been few studies to focus solely on how celiac disease presents among elderly people. To get a better understanding of how celiac disease presents in the elderly, a research team recently set out to compare aspects of celiac disease from elderly populations with a population of young adults with celiac disease. The first step was to assemble two groups of patients, an elderly cohort over 65-years old, and a young adult cohort aged 18–30 years, with biopsy-confirmed celiac disease. They did this by reviewing a tertiary center database of celiac disease patients with celiac disease, which provided data on symptom duration, clinical presentation, small intestinal pathology, associated conditions, and the presence of bone disease. The team reviewed data on 149 young adult and 125 elderly patients with celiac disease; The elderly subjects comprised 12.4% of the patient database. Both groups showed similar duration of symptoms before diagnosis, with young adults at 5.8 ± 12 years and elderly at 6.14 ± 12.6 years, respectively (p = 0.119). The presenting symptoms were also basically the same for both groups, with diarrhea being the main presenting symptom in 49% of young adults and 50% of the elderly (p = 0.921). Both groups showed similar rates of autoimmune disease, with 19% of young adult and 26% of elderly patients having relevant autoimmune conditions (p = 0.133). Both groups showed similar presence of villous atrophy and rates of bone disease, while the elderly group showed higher rates of thyroid disease and neuropathy (p = 0.037 and p = 0.023, respectively). The team expressed surprise that, both clinically and histologically, celiac disease seems to present similarly in elderly and young adult patients. They note that since the exact causes for celiac disease at any given age remain unclear and warrant further study. Source: Dig Dis Sci DOI 10.1007/s10620-010-1142-4.
  5. Celiac.com 07/24/2009 - Celiac disease is a common disorder affecting more than one percent of the population in the Western world. The condition is often assumed to affect children and young adults, and traditional celiac disease research has focused on the development of the disease in in those populations, and on the basic mechanisms at play over the lifetime of the disease. However, researchers recently showed a high number of both diagnosed and undetected celiac disease cases among elderly people. Currently, scientists know very little about the appearance of celiac disease in elderly people. A team of researchers based in Finland recently set out to examine the increasing prevalence and high incidence of celiac disease among the elderly. The research team was made up of Anitta Vilppula, Katri Kaukinen, Liisa Luostarinen, Ilkka Krekelä, Heikki Patrikainen, Raisa Valve, Markku Mäki and Pekka Collin. The team evaluated the prevalence of celiac disease in people over 55 years of age, and assessed the incidence of biopsy-proven celiac disease (CDb) and celiac disease including seropositive subjects for anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (CDb+s). The team based their study on celiac disease prevalence figures in 2815 randomly selected subjects who had undergone a clinical examination and serologic screening for celiac disease in 2002. A second screening in the same population was carried out in 2005, comprising now 2216 individuals. The team confirmed positive tissue transglutaminase antibodies results with small bowel biopsy. Over a three year period, the prevalence of CDb increased from 2.13 to 2.34%, and that of CDb+s from 2.45 to 2.70%. Five new cases emerged from five previously seronegative patients; two showed minor abdominal symptoms and three were asymptomatic. Celiac disease incidence in 2002–2005 was 0.23%, for an annual incidence of 0.08%. It's unclear whether the number of undetected cases in the elderly is due to diagnostic delay, or to the development of celiac disease at a more advanced age, or both. In closing, elderly people showed higher rates of celiac disease, but with subtle symptoms. Repeated screening detected five biopsy-proven cases in three years, indicating that the disorder may arise late, even among the elderly. The researchers are therefor recommending that doctors treating elderly patients employ an increased alertness as to the possible presence of celiac disease. BMC Gastroenterology 2009, 9:49
  6. Celiac.com 10/10/2008 - A team of Finnish researchers announced that they have found high rates of undetected celiac disease in elderly populations. They have also noted that a significant number of those older people diagnosed with celiac disease showed only minor symptoms. The study team was made up of doctors A. Vilppula, P. Collin, M. M¨aki, R. Valve, M. Luostarinen, I. Krekel¨a, H. Patrikainen, K. Kaukinen, and L. Luostarinen. Even with a wealth of new information on celiac disease from numerous recent studies, along with better testing methods, we still don’t know very much about rates of celiac disease in older people. Motivated by that fact, the team recently set out to study the prevalence of celiac disease in elderly populations. In theory, celiac disease should occur in the elderly at rates similar to, or lower than, those of the general population. Since current research indicates that about 1 person in a hundred has celiac disease, it seems logical to figure that rates of celiac disease among the elderly would be the same or even lower than rates for the general population. The researchers figured that clinically silent or undiagnosed celiac disease would be rare in elderly populations, as they would be likely to develop obvious symptoms. But the team was surprised to find that rates of celiac disease among the elderly are more than double those of the general population. They looked at 2,815 individuals between the ages of 52–74. They took blood samples from everyone and isolated people who showed signs of clinical celiac disease. They then screened the samples for IgA tissue transglutaminase antibodies. Subjects with positive antibody tests were given a small bowel biopsy. The doctors found celiac disease in 60 individuals, 25 (0.89%) through positive blood tests, and 35 (1.24%) through biopsy, for a total prevalence of in elderly subjects of 2.13% with 95% confidence intervals (1.60–2.67%). Of the screen-detected cases, only 15 had symptoms, and those were mostly mild. Driving home the dangers of late diagnosis, two out of the 60 had small bowel T-cell lymphoma and two had gastric cancer. Altogether, celiac disease was diagnosed through biopsy, and by blood test without a post-gluten-free diet follow-up test at a rate of 2.45% (1.88–3.02%). This study shows that celiac disease is far more prevalent in elderly people than in the general population. To better detect and treat celiac disease in elderly populations, the doctors are encouraging the use of active case finding using blood tests, since undetected celiac disease can lead to serious complications and even early death. 2008 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l.
×
×
  • Create New...