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Found 4 results

  1. Celiac.com 02/17/2017 - In recent tests, researchers found that microwave treatment (MWT) of wet wheat kernels caused a striking reduction in R5-antibody-based ELISA gluten readings, reducing the readings to under 20 ppm, so that wheat could theoretically be labeled as gluten-free. However, the actual gluten content of the wheat remained unchanged. Just the test reading changed. The research team included C Gianfrani, G Mamone, B la Gatta, A Camarca, L Di Stasio, F Maurano, S Picascia, V Capozzi, G Perna, G Picariello, A Di Luccia. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Protein Biochemistry, CNR, Naples, Italy, the Institute of Food Sciences, CNR Avellino, Italy, the Department of the Sciences of Agriculture, Food and Environment at the University of Foggia, Italy, the Institute of Food Sciences, CNR Avellino, Italy; Department of Agriculture, University of Naples, Portici (Na), Italy, the Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, Foggia (Italy) and National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Section of Bari, Italy, and the Department of the Sciences of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Foggia, Italy. The failure of R5 Elisa to register gluten in MWT stands in stark contrast to analysis of gluten peptides by G12 antibody-based ELISA, mass spectrometry-based proteomics, and in vitro assay with T cells of celiac subjects, all three of which gave consistent results both before and after MWT. As to what caused the R5 Elisa to misread the MWT samples, an SDS-PAGE analysis and Raman spectroscopy showed that MWT reduced the alcohol solubility of gliadins, and altered the access of R5-antibody to the gluten epitopes. Thus, MWT neither destroys gluten nor modifies chemically the toxic epitopes, this contradicts claims that MWT of wheat kernels detoxifies gluten. This study provides evidence that R5-antibody ELISA alone is not effective to determine gluten levels in thermally treated wheat products. Gluten epitopes in processed wheat should be monitored using strategies based on combined immunoassays with T cells from celiacs, G12-antibody ELISA after proteolysis and proper molecular characterization. Source: Food Chem Toxicol. 2017 Jan 12;101:105-113. doi: 10.1016/j.fct.2017.01.010.
  2. Celiac.com 03/16/2016 - If you have celiac disease, particularly if you are highly sensitive to gluten exposure, you may rely on commercial ELISA test kits for gluten detection. There are a large variety of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) commercially available for gluten detection in food, including new formats and assays with antibodies against relevant gluten epitopes. But, how accurate are these test kits for gluten detection? How reliable are they for people with celiac disease? A team of researchers recently set out to evaluate the accuracy of 14 ELISA kits for gluten detection. The kits they tested cover the full range of the current commercially available ELISA test kits. The researcher team included Ilona D. Bruins Slot, Maria G. E. G. Bremer, Ine van der Fels-Klerx, with RIKILT–Wageningen UR, Wageningen, the Netherlands, and Rob J. Hamer with the Laboratory of Food Chemistry at the Wageningen University and Research Centre in Wageningen, the Netherlands. In this study, the team assessed the performance of these kits in determining gluten content in a series of relevant food matrices varying in complexity. Their results show that none of the currently available ELISA methods can accurately detect and quantify gluten in all cases. This includes the current type I method R5 as recommended by Codex Alimentarius. In the face of these results, the team is calling for urgent improvements to testing kits, and recommends focusing on competitive formats, improving extraction methods, and the detection of relevant gluten peptides. Source: Cerealchemistry.aaccnet.org; September/October 2015, Volume 92, Number 5, Pages 513-521
  3. Hi All, I've been gluten free for over two years after being diagnosed with celiac. In the past few months I have started having increasing discomfort and bloating, which had initially stopped after going gluten free. My doctor redid the celiac panel and confirmed that I have not been getting into gluten, but I don't know what my next step should be. I suspect possibly additional food intolerances, but there are so many different foods that I don't know where to begin. Is there any test that would tell me what foods I might be intolerant to? I've heard of an elisa test but don't know if it's reliable. Or should I forget testing and remove almost all foods, then introduce things one at a time? If so, what would be the best foods to keep since I have to eat SOMETHING. (I also have osteoporosis, so plenty of calcium is a necessity.) Thanks so much for your wisdom!! :-)
  4. I've been gluten free for over a year. I just received results back from my Alletess ELISA IgG test that I did a few weeks ago. So, right now the only gluten allergy/sensitivity coming up is Rye. I haven't had products containing rye or rye bread in years. I'm also allergic/sensitive to baker's yeast, which is another product that I rarely ingest. Both wheat and flour were 'normal'. This is the first food allergy testing that I've had done. I've been told to take the results somewhat with a grain of salt due to the leaky gut that I'm still trying to heal, but I'm still considering it n revealing and insightful because I haven't had gluten in a long time, so I'm wondering why would rye be the only gluten coming up, if it's the same gluten. I carry the rarest of genes associated with celiac and have never tested positive on the antibody tests. I have two other known AI diseases.
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