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Found 7 results

  1. Hello All, This is my first post and I am curious if anyone has pancreas issues and saw a very severe fat malabsorption. Specifically - im worried about the malabsorbtion being related to pancreatic cancer. i did 23 and me and I have celiac genes, and an IgG test came back positive for wheat and oats. When i did this enterolab, i had reduced my gluten for awhile, but it was not at zero. Enterolab writes "Pancreatic insufficiency as the primary cause of fat malabsorption usually causes significant elevations of fecal fat values, usually into the moderate (600-1000 Units) or severe (>1000 Units) ranges." 1) Gluten Sensitivity PanelAnti-gliadin IgA 93 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA 20 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 2838 Units (Normal Range is less than 300 Units)
  2. Celiac.com 06/20/2016 - One evening in October 1999, while in my academic office at Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, my professional and personal life changed in an instant. I had recently had the idea of testing stool for gluten sensitivity to possibly prove that patients with microscopic colitis, whom displayed an epidemiologic, pathologic, and genetic overlap with celiac disease but who rarely had positive blood tests against gluten (because they rarely had the small bowel villous atrophy of celiac disease; they had colitis which is inflammation in the colon). I had remembered that previous researchers in Scotland invasively placing tubes into certain patients without villous atrophy had been able to find antibodies to gluten deep inside the small intestine when they were absent from the blood. They called these patients latent celiacs. However, they never reported results of testing stool, which would have been a lot easier to collect because it did not require the multiple hours and patient invasion of placing tubes deep inside the intestine. That October afternoon I received the first set of results from my laboratory of a newly improved method we had developed for testing stool for the presence of antigliadin IgA, the main antibody against wheat gluten. It was about 7:00PM, it was dark outside, and late enough in the office for everyone to have gone home, allowing me a quiet setting to review these results. What I saw that night seemed like a window into the future and a medical-scientific Pandora's box, all at the same time. Not only did I see that about 75% of the microscopic colitis patients had a positive fecal antigliadin test but 25% of asymptomatic volunteers did also. I quickly did the math, and realized that celiac disease at a prevalence of even 1% would pale in comparison to these statistics, revealing that hundreds of thousands of people in the US and the world may be gluten sensitive without having celiac disease. I knew that I had just been given information that no one else in the world knew, and that it would likely have major public health implications resulting from a new dietary-induced disease paradigm. That the main staple food of Western civilization may be causing large percentages of the population to have symptoms and syndromes, not only colitis, but perhaps also irritable bowel syndrome, autoimmune syndromes, short stature in children, multiple allergies and chemical sensitivities, and even idiopathic psycho-neurologic syndromes like depression, Parkinson's Disease or Lou Gehrig's disease. Not to mention what it might mean for me as the holder of this information. Then it happened—the most significant moment of my life up to that point—it felt like someone had tapped me on my left shoulder. Though I knew I was alone in the office, I turned to the left and looked upward for some reason for what or whom might have tapped me on my shoulder. And though, while I saw no one there, I immediately knew there was a presence with me at that moment, a spiritual or angelic presence. And then I heard these words in my head "You have to leave this place". And within minutes, the decision came to me that I indeed did have to leave my academic post of 15 years to bring the results of this new fecal testing method to the public: to the 25% of otherwise asymptomatic people reacting to dietary gluten with the same immunologic reaction measured in celiac disease, antigliadin antibody, as well as to the 75% of patients with microscopic colitis and perhaps other GI ailments and syndromes who, with a gluten-free diet, might heal their chronic refractory inflammatory bowel conditions. This was a bold line of thinking for me, as I had been on a professional trajectory toward the normal milestones of a successful young academic medicine career, becoming head of a sub-specialty medical department (for me, Gastroenterology), the prospects for which had just begun to surface in my life. Yet, I had just been called it seemed, by an encounter with a supernatural force, to an assignment of sorts with a mission to fulfill. And so, the idea of creating a specialty intestinal laboratory to make this new line of testing available to those in need of its benefits was born, EnteroLab.com (entero means intestine in Greek and in medical terminology). A "dot com" I thought? Yes, this form of testing should originate "in the comfort of your own home". Why make people with GI problems fly on an airplane half way across the country merely to give stool specimens for lab analysis (the practice of my Dallas hospital for decades up until that time). If I could create a mechanism whereby only the specimens but not the person could do the flying, then we could deliver results and follow-up dietary recommendations electronically, and the healing would begin shortly thereafter with dietary elimination of the causative antigenic foods. And if the client desired, they could have a paid phone consult with me or my nurse and still not have to spend the time, money, and difficulty flying to Dallas. And I have to admit, in 2000 it was kind of exciting to be the first doctor in the world to turn his entire medical career over to the internet, as well as to have created the first clinical laboratory serving people directly without the need of a prescription or previous doctor's visit, both incredibly bold and revolutionary ideas at the time (and perhaps still). I had learned from similar major paradigm shifts in my field of gastroenterology (specifically, in 1983 when doctors in Australia found in their research that ulcers might be caused by bacteria, but whom were laughed at and ignored for about 15 years, yet later in 2005 received a Nobel prize) that it would likely take 15-20 years before anyone in the medical field would believe my new research findings relating to non-celiac gluten sensitivity and its simple diagnosis with fecal testing. This, even though I was regarded even at my young age as an expert in the field, with a significant track record for developing unique and successful ideas for diagnosis and treatment of GI diseases (see my CV at www.intestinalhealth.org/CV), and having been trained by one of the most successful and respected gastroenterologists of all time, Dr. John Fordtran. While my medical peers might not believe my results for some time, people suffering the symptoms would not care whether or not it was too soon for a scientific paradigm to shift, because they would want to try a gluten-free diet to get better. And try, they did. Following positive stool test results from EnteroLab, they got better in droves going gluten-free, and in most cases with complete healing of long-standing symptoms and syndromes. And eventually I predicted, with such remarkable improvements that had never been possible before, their health practitioners (at least the honest, inquisitive, and non-egotistical ones) would ask them what had brought on such improvement. Eventually these practitioners would begin sending other patients for the same testing that had opened the door to the dietary miracle the gluten-free diet posed for those previously tested. Beyond the consequences of having to leave my academic positions and stature behind, I had to withstand some public and more often professional criticism for undertaking a bold and somewhat maverick professional move without the permission of my peers in doing so. This does not always go over smoothly in scientific and medical professional circles. Despite having been a highly respected young published researcher at that time (40 publications by the time I was in my mid-30's), my submissions both to professional GI society meetings and GI journals (journals that I had served as a reviewer for years) were rejecting my research submissions relating to this new paradigm of non-celiac gluten sensitivity. And it seemed, the rejections were not for objective reasons, but more subjective and for principle. Other researchers in this specific field and other fields have had to endure similar treatment. Sadly, submissions to these journals addressing paradigm-shifting topics are not always reviewed in unbiased, objective ways if they deal with a subject or contain conclusions that go against what the reviewers inherently believe to be true at that time (the "I'll see it when I believe it" scenario rather than "I'll believe it when I see it"). And yet, despite submissions of excellently performed and written studies that were rejected for these reasons by a system that seemed unready for this new paradigm, the most common public and professional criticisms of my methods primarily centered around my "lack of publication". This seemed circular and nonsensical to me. After all, had Michael Dell ever published his methods of making computers delivered in a revolutionary way (mail order) to its customers? These computers worked and served its customers well without a published method? Why is lack of publication of a medical technologic method equated with lack of Truth or efficacy? My response was and still is to remain true to my own data and experience, and my desire to serve and help people, and to not proceed according to the needs and critical dictates of others having no experience with my techniques. And so, 15 years later, as EnteroLab approaches our millionth patient tested, and with the current number of referring health practitioners in excess of 1,500, EnteroLab.com stands as a successful purveyor of medical Truth and public service. I ask people "How could hundreds of thousands of people be satisfactorily served over 15 years if what we are doing was not worthy and True?"; at some point, a person's or business' track record has got to stand for something positive and meaningful. And it seems my estimate of the time it would take for other researchers or mainstream practitioners to begin getting on board with the new paradigm was correct. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity has recently been further researched and substantiated to exist, just as I reported in public and professional lectures as early as 1999 (but published by others as early as 1980). And it has only been in the last 2 years or so that I have seen the question being raised at national and international GI meetings by "celiac researchers", but at least they are now doing so. Yet, the public has been the patron of the paradigm all along. In the last 4-5 years gluten-free food companies have carried the ball farther down the field than ever before. Yet interestingly, this focus on the food has mistakenly led people to regard this serious clinical syndrome as "a diet" not a disorder. And as we all know, "diets" come and go for people, even week to week. This is not healthful for any diet, but especially not for a gluten-free diet where the immune system can be hyperstimulated by repeatedly withdrawing and reintroducing such an immunogenic food. And yet, whether or not people choose to test for the syndrome with our stool test (the only test available to sensitively detect non-celiac gluten sensitivity), if they decide to go gluten-free, that must be a lifelong dietary decision. Otherwise, the test should be employed to help determine how serious the circumstances might be, and to further reinforce the clinical need of its permanency. Because after all, 25% of people, even when asymptomatic, have detectable immune reactions to gluten, and in many of these, damage to the intestine can be detected as well (measurable by EnteroLab from a fecal fat test from the same stool specimen). We have stood firm on the Truth of our research and clinical results, patiently waiting these 15 years for the public and professional paradigm-thinking to catch up. And catch up it has. Everyone today has at least heard about gluten, and people are not called crazy because going gluten-free makes them better physically, mentally and/or emotionally. But our work is not done. There are many millions more children and adults suffering not only from gluten sensitivity, but from other food sensitivities as well, and other diet-related maladies (obesity, endocrine problems including diabetes, eating disorders, food addictions, etc.). I am appreciative of the support and respect given to me and EnteroLab by Celiac.com and its founder, Scott Adams, who also knew early on there was something real about gluten sensitivity. His 14 year old "Journal of Gluten Sensitivity" is evidence of that. And so now, we are proud to partner with Celiac.com by allowing them to be the first company outside our own to offer our proprietary EnteroLab tests for sale, having created some special gluten-oriented testing panels for them. And as we go into the next decades of service, I leave you with a hint of the next, new paradigm… which is really the old paradigm. Gluten sensitivity is not limited to wheat, barley, and rye, but often includes oats as well (not just because of wheat contamination of the oats). This was the clinical standard from its beginning by the founder of the gluten-free diet, Dr. Willem Dicke, but that got changed in the last 10-15 years by substandard research methods based only on celiac disease as the end point and bias toward wanting to find such a result (all studies contain bias by the researchers, it's the nature of the mind influencing reality). So for the first time anywhere, we are using a diagnostic test for non-celiac oat sensitivity, and showing that about 50% of people reacting to wheat, barley, and rye, also react to oats with a similar immunologic reaction detectable in stool. But more on this as the information and paradigm-acceptance develops. Hopefully, this one won't take another 15 years to be accepted. We at EnteroLab and my non-profit public educational institute, The Intestinal Health Institute (www.IntestinalHealth.org), have been greatly honored to serve all our patrons to date, and we look forward to meeting and serving more of you in the future. For more information on testing at EnteroLab.com, please call 972-686-6869 or go to www.EnteroLab.com. Thank you for reading this historic account.
  3. I had tests in 2009 at Enterolab. I have not gone totally gluten-free since then, but I have avoided major sources like pasta and bread. Still I eat regular bread very occasionally and gluten-free pasta (corn and rice blend.) I still use cream in my coffee and eat cheese even though I have a sensitivity to casein. I avoid soy for the most part except for soy sauce on occasion. I feel that gluten and dairy are the things that trigger my gut issues. Should I be eating totally and strictly gluten-free based on these test results? Are there other tests I should have done? I have symptoms of gut pain, bloating, diarrhea (not as bad as it used to be), itchy skin (not as bad as before.) I have had sinus problems and infections as well for years—wondering if that is connected. I am on Wellbutrin for depression and also have to take Lunesta to sleep at night. I am now also taking thyroid hormone because half of my thyroid gland had to be removed (a non-cancerous nodule.) I feel I may have leaky gut too or some damage to the gut. And I'm starting to have gerd sometimes that wakes me up in the night. That is a new symptom. I'm tired a lot, but I am also on the Atkins (low-carb) diet on and off. I realize there is a genetic component to the gluten issue and I have family members (sisters) who have not been tested. However, my older sister is practically unable to go about her life without severe pain throughout her body. And one of my cousin's children was diagnosed with Celiac. Should I be taking this gluten issue more seriously? Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA: 39 units (they say normal is less than 10 units) Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA: 16 units (they say normal is less than 10 units) Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score: Less than 300 units (this seems to be a normal score) Fecal Anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA: 18 units (they say normal is less than 10 units) HLA-DQB1 Molecular Analysis, Allele 1: 0501 HLA-DQB1 Molecular Analysis, Allele 2: 0501 Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (Subtype 5,5) Fecal Anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA: 7 units (this seems to be a normal score) Fecal Anti-saccharomyces cerevisea (dietary yeast) IgA: 12 units (they say normal is less than 10 units) Fecal Anti-soy IgA: 16 units (they say normal is less than 10 units) Thank you for any help on this.
  4. I've been reading here quite a bit while impatiently awaiting my Enterolab test results. A year and a half ago, I had a negative blood test and biopsy, but that was after 13 months gluten free with only an 8 day gluten challenge. Since I have a son who is gluten sensitive and I've had digestive issues since I was two months old, I was really interested in the Enterolab tests. I feel better on a gluten free diet, but I still have some inflammation and disgestive issues, and Enterolab seemed like a reliable way to at least be pointed in the right direction to start elimination diets. (Other than gluten -- I've been gluten-free since October 2011 other than my 8 day gluten challenge in November 2012. Gluten is absolutely not an option for me)! Anyway, my results are below. Here are my questions: 1) The gene stuff is really confusing. Although I understand I don't have the celiac genes, I do have two gluten sensitivity genes. I just get confused by the "DQ8" , "DQ2", DQ1, terms I see on this forum. I know I don't have DQ2 or DQ8, but which DQ do I have? In the end, it probably doesn't matter, but I'd like to know so when I hear people talking about a DQ-whatever, I'll know "Oh that's me!" 2) Since I don't have DQ2 or DQ8 genes, I can't be celiac right? Because I have elevated Anti-TTG and some major malabsorbtion going on. I thought that those were celiac things. Especially the Anti-TTG which indicates auto-immune reaction. I had read previously that non-celiac gluten intolerance didn't produce auto-immune reactions, but celiac -- and only celiac -- does produce auto-immune reaction to gluten. I'm probably missing something. In addition to gluten, I now have to change my diet to eliminate dairy and egg too. (And also walnut and oats, which I find amusing because I've eaten them maybe five times in my life. I hate them both! Not sure how I have been making antibodies to those). Anyway, I'd be interested in any thoughts or answers to these questions. Thanks! A-2) Gluten/Antigenic Food Sensitivity Stool/Gene Panel Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA 19 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units) Fecal Anti-casein (cow’s milk) IgA 12 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units) Fecal Anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA 10 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units) Fecal Anti-soy IgA 7 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units) HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303 HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0603 Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,1 (Subtype 9,6) Anti-TissueTransglutaminase Antibody Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA 13 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units) C-1) Antigenic Food Sensitivity Stool Panel Mean Value 11 Antigenic Foods 7 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units) Within each class of foods to which you displayed multiple reactions, the hierarchy of those reactions detected were as follows: Grains: Grain toward which you displayed the most immunologic reactivity: Oat Nuts: Nut toward which you displayed the most immunologic reactivity: Walnut Fat Malabsorption Stool Test (Fecal Fat) Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 504 Units (Normal Range is less than 300 Units)
  5. Morning All, While using my limited Google-Fu skills to find a way of deciphering the results of my Enterolab stool testing, I saw several results pointing me to this forum. While I consider myself a reasonable intelligent person, this seems sort of Greek to me so, I thought I'd try to ask someone who might be more of a 'subject matter expert'. If I'm reading this correctly, I do not really have Celiac disease but, I do have sensitivity to both gluten and eggs (the later completely threw me for a loop!) - am I correct in my understanding? I also don't know if I really understand the genetic results but, again, sounds like I do not have the genes for Celiac but, do have two genes which indicate a predisposition to gluten sensitivity, does that sound right? Any input or guidance would be greatly appreciated. I'd like to be able to explain this to my other half who's pretty much said he won't be changing the way he cooks, with regard to the elimination of gluten, until I can show him there's a legitimate reason why he should (e.g., results showing that I have a sensitivity to wheat products). Thanks in advance for your time and information! Best, C. Edit - Realized I never included the actual results.... Gluten/Antigenic Food Sensitivity Stool/Gene Panel Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA 13 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units) Fecal Anti-casein (cow’s milk) IgA 7 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units) Fecal Anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA 13 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units) Fecal Anti-soy IgA 4 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units) HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0301 HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0609 Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,1 (Subtype 7,6) I wasn't sure if the narrative bits were also important to include but if so, please let me know and I'll happily update the information.
  6. Hi, Im looking to get tested from enterolab to see if I have celiac or gluten sensitivities. I was wondering if anyone can give me any insight. Been suffering for years, and have had no luck with doctors in the past because they thought I was making all my symptoms up. A friend that has celiac mentioned it to me years ago, but I thought you only had gastro problems, which I did have as kid-very badly. But now, my whole body is really sick, as you all know how that goes, and after doing much reading up on it- I swear I've finally found out what it is. Not to mention, my friend was right! I just want to have conformation for myself before I go gluten free. I also am going to try talking to my new doctor to see if he can run some blood tests. BUT, will be getting tested by enterolab first. That way, I can show him my results-proof. Im desperate to figure this out, as I cannot stand being sick any longer. I am only 24, and have been suffering my whole life. "Trying" to keep this short, sorry. So I'll spare all the symptoms, but what tests should I order? Anyone else used enterolab before? Thank you very much in advance!
  7. Hi all: I've been lurking here for about a month and finally decided to post. Thinking I may have a problem with gluten sensitivity, I did the Enterolab "poop" test (really gross, but had quite the laugh in the car on the way to UPS, wondering if they would ask me if I wanted to insure the contents! ). Here are my results: Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA 71 Units Fecal Anti-casein (cow’s milk) IgA 31 Units Fecal Anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA 9 Units Fecal Anti-soy IgA 13 Units Because anything over 10 is outside the normal range, I show sensitivities to gluten, casein, and soy. Then they checked my fat malabsorption: Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 1288 Units Anything over 300 is outside the normal range, with over 1000 being in the severe range. Wow!! Finally, I had my gene panel done: HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0301 HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0501 Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,1 (Subtype 7,5) No DQ2 or DQ8, but two gluten sensitivity genes, one of them a DQ7 which has been implicated in a low percentage of celiac cases. Here's a history of medical problems I've had over the years, many of which I've seen reported as correlaeted with celiac disease:: Bedwetter till age 12 (so were my sister and brother) Very irregular menstrual cycles Chronic UTI Fibromyalgia Seborrheic dermatitis (severe) - started with "cradle cap" as an infant Mouth sores Episodes of tingling and numbness Obesity since age 9 Diarrhea/Constipation/Stomach upset Frequent eye twitching Rosacea Severe hay fever Heart palpitations Costochondritis Kidney stones Gallstones Diverticulosis with 3 episodes of diverticulitis Migraine headaches Leukocytoclastic vasculitis (also known as cutaneous vasculitis), an autoimmune disorder Possible Sjogren's - rheumatologist did not test for it, but believes it's likely, although I'm not so sure I'm thinking I may be one of the few celiac patients without DQ2 or DQ8. I cannot have blood testing done because I've been gluten free and dairy free for about six weeks and have no desire to do a gluten challenge. I am feeling significantly better off gluten -- fibromyalgia pain is essentially gone, knees don't hurt, SD has cleared up, heart palpitations have slowed down, hay fever is reduced, UTI's have decreased, and I've lost about 13 pounds. What do y'all think?