Jump to content
  • Sign Up

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'enteropathy'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forums

  • Diagnosis & Recovery, Related Disorders & Research
    • Calendar of Events
    • Celiac Disease Pre-Diagnosis, Testing & Symptoms
    • Post Diagnosis, Recovery & Treatment of Celiac Disease
    • Related Disorders & Celiac Research
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis
    • Gluten Sensitivity and Behavior
  • Support & Help
    • Coping with Celiac Disease
    • Publications & Publicity
    • Parents' Corner
    • Gab/Chat Room
    • Doctors Treating Celiac Disease
    • Teenagers & Young Adults Only
    • Pregnancy
    • Friends and Loved Ones of Celiacs
    • Meeting Room
    • Celiac Disease & Sleep
    • Celiac Support Groups
  • Gluten-Free Lifestyle
    • Gluten-Free Foods, Products, Shopping & Medications
    • Gluten-Free Recipes & Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Restaurants
    • Ingredients & Food Labeling Issues
    • Traveling with Celiac Disease
    • Weight Issues & Celiac Disease
    • International Room (Outside USA)
    • Sports and Fitness
  • When A Gluten-Free Diet Just Isn't Enough
    • Food Intolerance & Leaky Gut
    • Super Sensitive People
    • Alternative Diets
  • Forum Technical Assistance
    • Board/Forum Technical Help
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Events
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Groups/Organizations in the DFW area

Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Celiac.com Sponsors
  • Celiac Disease
  • Safe Gluten-Free Food List / Unsafe Foods & Ingredients
  • Gluten-Free Food & Product Reviews
  • Gluten-Free Recipes
    • American & International Foods
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Biscuits, Rolls & Buns
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Noodles & Dumplings
    • Gluten-Free Dessert Recipes: Pastries, Cakes, Cookies, etc.
    • Gluten-Free Bread Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Flour Mixes
    • Gluten-Free Kids Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Snacks & Appetizers
    • Gluten-Free Muffin Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pancake Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pizza Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Soups, Sauces, Dressings & Chowders
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Scone Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Waffle Recipes
  • Celiac Disease Diagnosis, Testing & Treatment
  • Celiac Disease & Gluten Intolerance Research
  • Miscellaneous Information on Celiac Disease
    • Additional Celiac Disease Concerns
    • Celiac Disease Research Projects, Fundraising, Epidemiology, Etc.
    • Conferences, Publicity, Pregnancy, Church, Bread Machines, Distillation & Beer
    • Gluten-Free Diet, Celiac Disease & Codex Alimentarius Wheat Starch
    • Gluten-Free Food Ingredient Labeling Regulations
    • Celiac.com Podcast Edition
  • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity
    • Spring 2019 Issue
    • Winter 2019 Issue
    • Autumn 2018 Issue
    • Summer 2018 Issue
    • Spring 2018 Issue
    • Winter 2018 Issue
    • Autumn 2017 Issue
    • Summer 2017 Issue
    • Spring 2017 Issue
    • Winter 2017 Issue
    • Autumn 2016 Issue
    • Summer 2016 Issue
    • Spring 2016 Issue
    • Winter 2016 Issue
    • Autumn 2015 Issue
    • Summer 2015 Issue
    • Spring 2015 Issue
    • Winter 2015 Issue
    • Autumn 2014 Issue
    • Summer 2014 Issue
    • Spring 2014 Issue
    • Winter 2014 Issue
    • Autumn 2013 Issue
    • Summer 2013 Issue
    • Spring 2013 Issue
    • Winter 2013 Issue
    • Autumn 2012 Issue
    • Summer 2012 Issue
    • Spring 2012 Issue
    • Winter 2012 Issue
    • Autumn 2011 Issue
    • Summer 2011 Issue
    • Spring 2011 Issue
    • Spring 2006 Issue
    • Summer 2005 Issue
  • Celiac Disease & Related Diseases and Disorders
  • The Origins of Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Grains and Flours
  • Oats and Celiac Disease: Are They Gluten-Free?
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Celiac Disease Support Groups
  • Celiac Disease Doctor Listing
  • Kids and Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Travel
  • Gluten-Free Cooking
  • Gluten-Free
  • Allergy vs. Intolerance
  • Tax Deductions for Gluten-Free Food
  • Gluten-Free Newsletters & Magazines
  • Gluten-Free & Celiac Disease Links
  • History of Celiac.com

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Interests


Location


First Name


Last Name


City


State


Country


How did you hear about us?

Found 8 results

  1. Celiac.com 01/23/2018 - Benicar (olmesartan medoxomil) is a hypertension drug used for high blood pressure, and which is known to cause numerous side-effects in patients, including dangerous celiac sprue-like enteropathy, and is the subject of numerous lawsuits, and a $300 million settlement. Now the respected consumer advocacy group Public Citizen is calling for the FDA to ban the sale Benicar, due to the potential for side effects to which Public Citizen refers as "life-threatening." According to Public Citizen, originally founded by consumer advocate Ralph Nader, olmesartans risks outweigh any benefits. In a November 15 press release following their 20-page petition to the FDA, the organization warned that "Keeping the medication on the market would continue to put hypertension patients' lives at risk for the sake of corporate profits." While the FDA has formally acknowledged receiving the petition, there is no indication that any action is forthcoming any time soon. The agency can sometimes take years to act. Numerous drug experts note the availability of comparable hypertension drugs that are equally effective in lowering blood pressure without such dire side effects as the sprue-like enteropathy that "leads to severe and chronic diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain and weight loss…that often lands a patient in the hospital," noted the petition. Sometimes this sprue-like enteropathy is misdiagnosed as a celiac disorder, when in reality it is due to olmesarten use. Benicar, together with Azor, Benicar HCT, and Tribenzor, are unique in their association with sprue-like enteropathy. It is why so many plaintiffs reference Benicar defective products in their allegations, and why Public Citizen wants them off the market. Source: lawyersandsettlements.com
  2. Celiac.com 03/20/2013 - People with celiac disease all have some degree of damage to the small intestinal mucosa, ranging from lymphocytic duodenosis with normal villous structure to severe villous atrophy. To determine whether the severity of mucosal lesions was associated with clinical and laboratory features of celiac disease, a team of researchers recently conducted a study on celiac disease with mild enteropathy. The researchers included B. Zanini, F. Caselani, A. Magni, D. Turini, A. Ferraresi, F. Lanzarotto, V. Villanacci, N. Carabellese, C. Ricci, A. Lanzini. They are affiliated with the Gastroenterology Unit at the University of Brescia in Brescia, Italy. For their study, they compared demographic, clinical, and laboratory characteristics among patients with celiac disease who were classified based on the severity of duodenal lesions. The team assessed data from 1408 adult celiac patients seen consecutively at an outside referral center since 1990. 1249 patients showed villous atrophy, while 159 showed mild enteropathy (n = 159). Patients with villous atrophy, compared with mild enteropathy, showed similar rates of weight loss (17% vs 17%), gastrointestinal manifestations (70% vs 70%), extra-intestinal manifestations (66% vs 57%), and other associated conditions (19% vs 23%). Patients with villous atrophy more commonly developed osteopenia or osteoporosis than patients with mild enteropathy (22% vs 5%; P = .0005). Compared to those with mild enteropathy, patients with villous atrophy had higher rates of anemia (42% vs 29%; P = .002), folate deficiency (75% vs 64%; P = .02), hypocholesterolemia (7% vs 2%; P = .02), hypocalcemia (26% vs 13%; P = .004), or hyperparathyroidism (45% vs 29%; P = .004). Although osteopenia, osteoporosis, and test results that fall outside of laboratory parameters are common among celiac disease patients with mild enteropathy, they are more common and more severe in patients with villous atrophy. Patients with villous atrophy and those with mild enteropathy showed similar rates of celiac-associated conditions. These results indicate that celiac disease with mild enteropathy is not mild disease, and definitely requires treatment with a gluten-free diet. What do you think? Do you have celiac disease with mild enteropathy? Do you consider this to be a 'mild' condition? Share your comments below. Source: Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2012 Sep 27. pii: S1542-3565(12)01142-1. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2012.09.027.
  3. Celiac.com 08/12/2011 - Although serological analysis is used in diagnosing celiac disease, histopathology is regarded as most reliable. A team of researchers set out to assess the clinical, pathological and serological spectrum of celiac disease in a general population via prospective study (Kalixanda study). The research team included Marjorie M. Walker, Joseph A. Murray, Jukka Ronkainen, Pertti Aro, Tom Storskrubb, Mauro D’Amato, Brian Lahr, Nicholas J. Talley, and Lars Agreus. For their study, the team evaluated a random sample of 1000 adults from the general population by upper endoscopy, duodenal biopsy, and serological analysis of tissue transglutaminase (tTg) levels. They screened samples that were tTg+ for endomysial antibody (EMA) levels. The baseline value for celiac diagnosis was villous atrophy with 40 intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs)/100 enterocytes (ECs). The team found 33 subjects with tTg+ and 16 with EMA+. Their histological analysis showed 7/1000 subjects (0.7%) with celiac disease, all of whom showed tTg+ and 6 of 7 of whom showed EMA+. Another 26 subjects showed tTg+, 7 of 26 showing EMA+. The team then addressed these cases with a second quantitative pathology study, this one a nested case-control design, that used a celiac diagnosis baseline of 25 IELS/100 ECs. Under this criteria, all 13 samples that were tTg+ and EMA+ had more than 25 IELs/100ECs. A total of 16 subjects (1.6%) showed serological and histological evidence of gluten-sensitive enteropathy. The team quantified IELs in duodenal biopsy samples from 500 seronegative individuals. A total of 19 (3.8%) of those subjects had >25 IELs and lymphocytic duodenosis (LD). A celiac diagnosis level of ≥25 IELs/100 ECs was strongly associated with serological indicators of celiac disease, while a higher IEL threshold missed half of cases. Quantification of tTg is a sensitive test for celiac disease, and diagnosis can be confirmed by observation of ≥25 IELs/100ECs in duodenal biopsy. Lymphocytic enteropathy in the form of both celiac disease and Lymphocytic duodenitis, is common, occurring in about 5.4% of the general population. Source: Gastroenterology doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2010.04.007
  4. Celiac.com 04/15/2013 - Enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma (EATL) is a gut cancer that often ends in death. Currently, doctors have very little idea what factors might help patients survive. The manner in which clinical presentation, pathological features and therapies influence EATL outcome was the subject of a recent study by a team of researchers. The research team included: G. Malamut; O. Chandesris; V. Verkarre; B.Meresse, C. Callens, E. Macintyre, Y. Bouhnik, J.M. Gornet; M. Allez; R. Jian; A. Berger; G. Châtellier; N. Brousse, O. Hermine, N. Cerf-Bensussan, and C. Cellier. They are variously affiliated with the Université Paris Descartes, the Gastroenterology Department of Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, APHP, and Inserm U989 in Paris, France. For their study, the team evaluated the medical files of 37 well-documented patients with celiac disease and T-cell lymphoma. They then analyzed lymphoma and intestinal mucosa by histopathology, multiplex PCR and intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes phenotyping. Using Kaplan-Meier curves with Logrank test and Cox Model they then analyzed patient survival and prognostic factors. They found 15 patients with lymphoma-complicated non-clonal enteropathy, celiac disease, two patients with type I refractory celiac disease, and 20 patients with clonal type II refractory celiac disease. Twenty-five patients underwent surgery with resection of the main tumor mass in 22 cases. Univariate analysis showed that non-clonal celiac disease, serum albumin levels under 21.6g/L at diagnosis, chemotherapy and surgical resection predicted good survival (p=0.0007, p Multivariate analysis showed that serum albumin level>21.6g/L, chemotherapy and reductive surgery were all significantly associated with increased survival rates (p The results reinforce the value of assessing celiac disease type in patients with T-cell lymphoma, and suggest that a combination of nutritional, chemotherapy and reductive surgery may improve survival rates in cases of EATL. Source: Dig Liver Dis. 2013 Jan 9. pii: S1590-8658(12)00438-0. doi: 10.1016/j.dld.2012.12.001.
  5. Author: Rensch MJ; Merenich JA; Lieberman M; Long BD; Davis DR; McNally PR. Address: Fitzsimons Army Medical Center, Aurora, Colorado, USA. Source: Ann Intern Med, 124: 6, 1996 Mar 15, 564-7 OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in a cohort of patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with coexistent disease. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: U.S. Army medical center. PATIENTS: 47 patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. MEASUREMENTS: Antiendomysial antibody testing was used to screen for celiac disease. The diagnosis of celiac disease required histologic evidence of villous atrophy and crypt hyperplasia and a positive antiendomysial antibody test result. In patients identified as having coexistent disease, complete blood counts, multiphasic biochemical testing, D-xylose absorption testing, and bone mineral density estimates were done. RESULTS: 3 of 47 patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (6.4%; 95% CI, 1.4% to 17.5%) had positive antiendomysial antibody test results and small-bowel biopsy specimens consistent with celiac disease. The 95% CI lies entirely above the estimated prevalence of celiac disease expected in the general U.S. population, which ranges from 0.02% to 0.1%. Mean bone mineral densities were 0.8 and 1.1 SD below age-, ethnicity-, and sex-matched controls in each of the 2 antiendomysial antibody-positive patients tested. Small bowel absorption was abnormal in 1 of the 2 patients tested by D-xylose. Anemia and hypoalbuminemia were not detected in any of the patients with coexistent disease. Only 1 of the 3 patients had symptoms of diarrhea. All patients were at or above their ideal body weights. CONCLUSIONS: Celiac disease appears to be more common among patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus than in the general U.S. population (p less than 0.001). Two of the three patients with coexistent disease in this study had sub-clinical or latent celiac disease.
  6. Celiac.com 04/20/2010 - A team of researchers recently set out to determine whether new serology assays can detect gluten sensitivity among enteropathy patients seronegative for anti–tissue transglutaminase. Emilia Sugai, Hui Jer Hwang, Horacio Vázquez, Edgardo Smecuol, Sonia Niveloni, Roberto Mazure, Eduardo Mauriño, Pascale Aeschlimann, Walter Binder, Daniel Aeschlimann and Julio C. Bai comprised the research team. They are variously affiliated with the Small Bowel Section of the Department of Medicine at C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital in Buenos Aires, Argentina, the Matrix Biology and Tissue Repair Research Unit at the Cardiff University School of Dentistry in Cardiff, UK, and with INOVA Diagnostics, Inc., of San Diego, California. Some patients with celiac disease may not show a normal positive reaction to the test most commonly used for IgA anti–tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG) antibodies. The research team set out to determine the usefulness of newer assays incorporating synthetic deamidated gliadin-related peptides (DGPs), or other TG isoenzymes as antigen, for detecting gluten sensitivity in IgA anti-tTG–seronegative patients. The team tested blood samples drawn at diagnosis from 12 anti-tTG–seronegative patients with a celiac-like enteropathy, from 26 patients with skin biopsy–proven dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) and, lastly, from 26 patients with IgA anti-tTG–positive celiac disease. All patients showed typical levels of total IgA. On each patient, the team conducted intestinal biopsy and serum testing for detection of IgA and IgG isotypes of both anti-DGP and anti-tTG in a single assay (tTG/DGP Screen; INOVA Diagnostics). They also tested each patient for simultaneous detection of both IgA and IgG anti-DGP antibody isotypes (DGP Dual; INOVA Diagnostics). Lastly, they tested each patient for the detection of antibodies to transglutaminase 3 (TG3) or transglutaminase 6 (TG6). All patients who showed positive anti-tTG results also tested positive in anti-DGP assays. The tTG/DGP Screen caught six of the 19 anti-tTG seronegatives (31.6%), while anti-DGP Dual produced caught five of these cases (26.3%). Whereas both assays detected 2 anti-tTG–negative DH patients with partial villous atrophy, they were positive in only 2 of the 5 cases with no histologically discernible mucosal damage. Testing for antibodies to TG3 and TG6 caught seven of the 19 anti-tTG–negative patients (36.8%), five of whom also tested positive for anti-DGP. From these results, the team concludes that using tTG/DGP Screen, or anti-DGP Dual, to detect anti-DGP improves diagnostic sensitivity of gluten sensitive patients with non–IgA- deficiency, or anti-tTG–seronegativity, and celiac-like enteropathy. The same enhancement is also achieved by detecting antibodies to other TG isoenzymes. Source: Clinical Chemistry 56: 661-665, 2010.
  7. Celiac.com 07/09/2010 - The enteropathy associated with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common symptomatic primary antibody deficient syndrome, with an estimated prevalence of one in one-hundred thousand to one in fifty thousand. However, the relationship between CVID and Enteropathy is still unclear. CVID is characterized by decreased levels of of two or more serum immunoglobulin (Ig) isotypes and the presentation of reoccurring infections specifically in the respiratory tract. Gastrointestinal symptoms are widespread with CVID patients as exhibited in as many as 50% of patients presenting with chronic diarrhea. A team of doctors evaluated the medical files of 50 CVID patients who exhibited gastrointestinal symptoms to determine the “clinical and hitopathological features of the enteropathy associated with CVID”. Fifteen patients were excluded from the study because they did not meet the recognized criteria for CVID. Data was collected from all patients and included, gender, age, symptoms, body mass index (BMI), as well as parasitological stool testing. Blood samples were taken from each test patient including hemogram, serum protein electrophoresis and measurements of serum folic acid, vitamin B12, iron, and calcium. The doctors found the mean age for initial CVID diagnosis to be 36.8 years. Four of the patients were discovered to have a family history of immunodeficiency. 40% of the patients that were tested were determined to have immunodeficiency as revealed by their digestive symptoms. Chronic diarrhea was observed as the most common gastrointestinal symptom with a rate of 92% of the patients studied. Gluten-free diet was initiated by 12 patients with villous atrophy, but clinical improvements and partial villous healing only occurred in two patients. Interestingly, the two patients presenting with celiac antibodies, did not show an improvement of symptoms. All patients showed positive improvements from steroid therapy. Furthermore, as a result of this study, the observing doctors concluded, that of the CVID patients exhibiting gastrointestinal symptoms, histological lesions were found in around 80% of the biopsies taken from the colon, stomach, or small bowel. The enteropathy corresponding with CVID was found to have has many features that differentiate it from other etiopathological conditions including celiac disease. While replacement Ig therapy was demonstrated to be inadequate for improving gastrointestinal symptoms, steroids, specifically budesonide,were proven successful in reducing inflammation and restoring mucosal architecture. Source: The American Journal of Gastroenterology , (15June2010) | doi:10.1038/ajg.2010.214
  8. Author: Troncone R; Greco L; Auricchio S Address: Department of Pediatrics, University Federico II, Naples, Italy. Source: Pediatr Clin North Am, 43: 2, 1996 Apr, 355-73 Abstract: Gluten-sensitive enteropathy is induced by dietary wheat gliadin and related proteins in genetically susceptible individuals. Most evidence suggests that the mucosal lesion represents an immunologically mediated injury triggered by gluten in the context of a particular assortment of major histocompatibility complex genes. The amino acid residues of gliadin and related proteins responsible for toxicity have not been identified; in vitro systems are available, but definitive conclusions must rely on in vivo jejunal challenges. At a conservative estimate, symptomatic gluten-sensitive enteropathy affects approximately 1 in 1000 individuals in Europe; however, it is now becoming clear that a greater proportion of individuals has clinically silent disease, and probably many others have a minor form of the the enteropathy. In most countries, the clinical presentation has changed over the past few years coming closer to the adult type of the disease, and the age of onset of symptoms is shifting upward. Liver, joint, hematologic, dental, and neurological symptoms are increasingly being recognized. Several diseases are associated the gluten-sensitive enteropathy, such as IgA deficiency, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and a range of other autoimmune diseases. Tests based on the measurement of antigliadin and antiendomysium antibodies have gained success as noninvasive screening tests; however, the ultimate diagnosis still is based on the finding of a severe histologic lesion of the jejunum while the patient is on a gluten-containing diet and on its disappearance once the gluten is excluded from the diet. A lifelong, strict gluten-free diet is mandatory for celiac children. Among other long-term problems, an increased risk of intestinal lymphoma has been reported in patients on a normal gluten-containing diet.
×
×
  • Create New...