Jump to content
Celiac Disease FAQ | This site uses cookies GDPR notice. Read more... ×
  • Sign Up

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'eosinophilic'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forums

  • Diagnosis & Recovery, Related Disorders & Research
    • Calendar of Events
    • Celiac Disease Pre-Diagnosis, Testing & Symptoms
    • Post Diagnosis, Recovery & Treatment of Celiac Disease
    • Related Disorders & Celiac Research
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis
    • Gluten Sensitivity and Behavior
  • Support & Help
    • Coping with Celiac Disease
    • Publications & Publicity
    • Parents' Corner
    • Gab/Chat Room
    • Doctors Treating Celiac Disease
    • Teenagers & Young Adults Only
    • Pregnancy
    • Friends and Loved Ones of Celiacs
    • Meeting Room
    • Celiac Disease & Sleep
    • Celiac Support Groups
  • Gluten-Free Lifestyle
    • Gluten-Free Foods, Products, Shopping & Medications
    • Gluten-Free Recipes & Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Restaurants
    • Ingredients & Food Labeling Issues
    • Traveling with Celiac Disease
    • Weight Issues & Celiac Disease
    • International Room (Outside USA)
    • Sports and Fitness
  • When A Gluten-Free Diet Just Isn't Enough
    • Food Intolerance & Leaky Gut
    • Super Sensitive People
    • Alternative Diets
  • Forum Technical Assistance
    • Board/Forum Technical Help
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Events
  • DFW/Central Texas Celiacs's Groups/Organizations in the DFW area

Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Celiac.com Sponsors
  • Celiac Disease
  • Safe Gluten-Free Food List / Unsafe Foods & Ingredients
  • Gluten-Free Food & Product Reviews
  • Gluten-Free Recipes
    • American & International Foods
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Biscuits, Rolls & Buns
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Noodles & Dumplings
    • Gluten-Free Dessert Recipes: Pastries, Cakes, Cookies, etc.
    • Gluten-Free Bread Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Flour Mixes
    • Gluten-Free Kids Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Snacks & Appetizers
    • Gluten-Free Muffin Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pancake Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Pizza Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Soups, Sauces, Dressings & Chowders
    • Gluten-Free Recipes: Cooking Tips
    • Gluten-Free Scone Recipes
    • Gluten-Free Waffle Recipes
  • Celiac Disease Diagnosis, Testing & Treatment
  • Celiac Disease & Gluten Intolerance Research
  • Miscellaneous Information on Celiac Disease
    • Additional Celiac Disease Concerns
    • Celiac Disease Research Projects, Fundraising, Epidemiology, Etc.
    • Conferences, Publicity, Pregnancy, Church, Bread Machines, Distillation & Beer
    • Gluten-Free Diet, Celiac Disease & Codex Alimentarius Wheat Starch
    • Gluten-Free Food Ingredient Labeling Regulations
    • Celiac.com Podcast Edition
  • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity
    • Spring 2019 Issue
    • Winter 2019 Issue
    • Autumn 2018 Issue
    • Summer 2018 Issue
    • Spring 2018 Issue
    • Winter 2018 Issue
    • Autumn 2017 Issue
    • Summer 2017 Issue
    • Spring 2017 Issue
    • Winter 2017 Issue
    • Autumn 2016 Issue
    • Summer 2016 Issue
    • Spring 2016 Issue
    • Winter 2016 Issue
    • Autumn 2015 Issue
    • Summer 2015 Issue
    • Spring 2015 Issue
    • Winter 2015 Issue
    • Autumn 2014 Issue
    • Summer 2014 Issue
    • Spring 2014 Issue
    • Winter 2014 Issue
    • Autumn 2013 Issue
    • Summer 2013 Issue
    • Spring 2013 Issue
    • Winter 2013 Issue
    • Autumn 2012 Issue
    • Summer 2012 Issue
    • Spring 2012 Issue
    • Winter 2012 Issue
    • Autumn 2011 Issue
    • Summer 2011 Issue
    • Spring 2011 Issue
    • Spring 2006 Issue
    • Summer 2005 Issue
  • Celiac Disease & Related Diseases and Disorders
    • Lists of Diseases and Disorders Associated with Celiac Disease
    • Addison's Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Anemia and Celiac Disease
    • Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia and Celiac Disease
    • Arthritis and Celiac Disease
    • Asthma and Celiac Disease
    • Ataxia, Nerve Disease, Neuropathy, Brain Damage and Celiac Disease
    • Attention Deficit Disorder and Celiac Disease
    • Autism and Celiac Disease
    • Bacterial Overgrowth and Celiac Disease
    • Cancer, Lymphoma and Celiac Disease
    • Candida Albicans and Celiac Disease
    • Canker Sores (Aphthous Stomatitis) & Celiac Disease
    • Casein / Cows Milk Intolerance and Celiac Disease
    • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Cognitive Impairment and Celiac Disease
    • Crohn's Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Depression and Celiac Disease
    • Dermatitis Herpetiformis: Skin Condition Associated with Celiac Disease
    • Diabetes and Celiac Disease
    • Down Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Dyspepsia, Acid Reflux and Celiac Disease
    • Epilepsy and Celiac Disease
    • Eye Problems, Cataract and Celiac Disease
    • Fertility, Pregnancy, Miscarriage and Celiac Disease
    • Fibromyalgia and Celiac Disease
    • Flatulence (Gas) and Celiac Disease
    • Gall Bladder Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Celiac Disease
    • Geographic Tongue (Glossitis) and Celiac Disease
    • Growth Hormone Deficiency and Celiac Disease
    • Heart Failure and Celiac Disease
    • Infertility, Impotency and Celiac Disease
    • Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Intestinal Permeability and Celiac Disease
    • Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Kidney Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Liver Disease and Celiac Disease
    • Lupus and Celiac Disease
    • Malnutrition, Body Mass Index and Celiac Disease
    • Migraine Headaches and Celiac Disease
    • Multiple Sclerosis and Celiac Disease
    • Myasthenia Gravis Celiac Disease
    • Obesity, Overweight & Celiac Disease
    • Osteoporosis, Osteomalacia, Bone Density and Celiac Disease
    • Psoriasis and Celiac Disease
    • Refractory Celiac Disease & Collagenous Sprue
    • Sarcoidosis and Celiac Disease
    • Scleroderma and Celiac Disease
    • Schizophrenia / Mental Problems and Celiac Disease
    • Sepsis and Celiac Disease
    • Sjogrens Syndrome and Celiac Disease
    • Skin Problems and Celiac Disease
    • Sleep Disorders and Celiac Disease
    • Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Celiac Disease
    • Thyroid & Pancreatic Disorders and Celiac Disease
    • Tuberculosis and Celiac Disease
  • The Origins of Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Grains and Flours
  • Oats and Celiac Disease: Are They Gluten-Free?
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Celiac Disease Support Groups
    • United States of America: Celiac Disease Support Groups and Organizations
    • Outside the USA: Celiac Disease Support Groups and Contacts
  • Celiac Disease Doctor Listing
  • Kids and Celiac Disease
  • Gluten-Free Travel
  • Gluten-Free Cooking
  • Gluten-Free
  • Allergy vs. Intolerance
  • Tax Deductions for Gluten-Free Food
  • Gluten-Free Newsletters & Magazines
  • Gluten-Free & Celiac Disease Links
  • History of Celiac.com
    • History of Celiac.com Updates Through October 2007
    • Your E-mail in Support of Celiac.com 1996 to 2006

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Interests


Location

Found 6 results

  1. Had digestive issues, severe reflux, dysphagia, and bloating on and off for two years. Went to GI, got endoscopy and blood test which confirmed celiac. Been gluten free for about 3 weeks now; feel great although my body is still adjusting. Additionally I was diagnosed with Eosinophilic Esophagitis; basically asthma in my esophagus. A biopsy confirmed this. Went to a food allergist, no terrible food allergies (bananas, raw egg whites, ironically I have an allergy to gluten, wheat, rye, and barley that seems separate from the celiac). Right now I'm on a PPI, vitamin D, and Flovent which is an inhaler that allegedly treats EoE in some trials. Hard to tell what my prognosis is depending on how related the two are, but I guess I won't know until I go off the medication for the a while and I have a follow up endoscopy. In the meantime I'm just curious to see if anyone else has the same diagnosis or information pertaining to it.
  2. Dr. Vikki Petersen D.C, C.C.N

    Eosinophilic Esophagitis: Do You Know Anyone Who Suffers?

    What is eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE)? Let's break it down: The esophagus is the long tube that connects your mouth to your stomach. What goes through your esophagus? Food and drink. Eosinophils are a type of white blood cell that increases in the case of allergy. EoE is a condition where eosinophils have infiltrated the lining of the esophagus causing inflammation and discomfort. It affects both children and adults, more males than females, and can manifest in failure to thrive and feed in infants, as well as heartburn and difficulty swallowing solid food in older patients. EoE results in a stiffening of the esophagus with strictures, making it quite difficult and uncomfortable to swallow. It seems fairly clear that if white blood cells associated with food allergy increase in an area of the body that food passes through, the obvious conclusion to form is that the individual is eating something they are having a negative reaction to—right? Yet standard treatment for this condition, which is rising in incidence, is drugs (specifically proton pump inhibitors) and mechanical dilation of the restricted esophagus when these other medications fail to work. I do find it interesting that we are seeing more and more of this condition over the last 20 years, during which time the American diet has continued to worsen. Diagnosis is made from an endoscopy that evaluates swallowing and includes a biopsy of the esophagus that reveals a high eosinophil count. Causes of EoE include acid reflux, which affects the lining of the esophagus, often causing ulcers, while less common causes are viruses (herpes simplex) and fungal medications that become stuck in the esophagus, creating the inflammation seen with the condition. Due to the acid reflux component and the tendency in our country to treat with drugs first, proton pump inhibitors that lessen acid production and therefore lessen the symptoms of acid reflux, are recommended as the first order of treatment—even in children. The protocol is 4 to 8 weeks of the drug, after which time the symptoms are re-evaluated to see if they have improved or remain the same. If they remain, a diagnosis of EoE is made. I'm not saying that short-term use of proton pump inhibitors has no value. If someone has a bacterial infection of the stomach (H. pylori) that can result in ulcers, or an active ulcer, this drug is effective. It can also provide symptomatic relief for someone who is miserable with the symptoms of EoE. But it's not the root cause ‘answer' for the condition and it particularly upsets me when very young children come in who are already on the drug. Why? The problem with the protocol that uses proton pump inhibitors is two-fold: It's typically not addressing the root cause, which is a food reaction. It's likely making the real root cause worse. This is interesting. If the problem is actually a food reaction or allergy, a proton pump inhibitor that lessens acid production actually compromises the ability of the body to digest food. This compromised digestion makes it MORE likely that an allergy or food reaction will develop. Fortunately, a new study sheds light on how effective dietary treatment can be. On February 14, 2014, the journal Gastroenterology published an article entitled "Efficacy of Dietary Interventions in Inducing Histologic Remission in Patients with Eosinophilic Esophagitis: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. The researchers evaluated 581 references and data from 1317 patients, both children and adults who received different dietary treatments. The treatments included amino acid-based elemental formulas (basically a liquid diet that is completely allergen free), elimination diets based on allergy testing and 6-food elimination diets that include the removal of wheat, milk, soy, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, fish, and shellfish. What the researchers looked for was the ability to reduce infiltration of the eosinophils in follow-up biopsies. This would mean that the body's immune system was no longer mounting an inflammatory response. Their findings were as follows: Elemental diets (liquid and allergy-free) were effective in 91% of cases. The Six food elimination diet was effective in 72% of the cases. Foods removed based on the result of allergy tests were effective in 46% of the cases. Both adults and children seemed to respond equally. What can we learn from this study? Eliminating common allergens, including gluten, a known inflammatory agent, is a great place to start when trying to improve this condition. A full 91% and 72% improved when common allergic foods were removed. Those are some pretty impressive percentages. I have found an interesting trend in our country. If doctors have the option of giving a prescription or asking a patient to make a dietary change, they will opt for the prescription. It's certainly easier to swallow a pill rather than make a dietary and lifestyle change. I'll grant you that. But is it right? When you appreciate that the pill is a mere band-aid and a highly temporary one at that, what really is a doctor doing for someone in NOT insisting that they change their diet? The truth of the matter is that taking the ‘easy' way out is not only cowardly, it is irresponsible. After the drug stops working, then what? Realize that throughout the period of time that the patient was on the drug, they were continuing to eat whatever was actually creating the problem and therefore their esophagus became more and more inflamed. While the human body's ability to heal is quite miraculous, once sufficient hardening and strictures have occurred in the esophagus, a full return to normalcy might not be possible. It is important that we intervene with the correct therapy quickly. Another facet to the ‘drug over food' decision on the part of most doctors is that they themselves don't change their own diets. I have often spoken with doctors who are themselves unhealthy yet they refuse to change their diets and are therefore convinced that they won't get their patients to make lifestyle changes either. Thus, they don't tend to recommend it because they are already convinced it won't occur. Is it fair to the patient to take the easy way out while they continue to worsen? I don't think so. Personally, I can tell you that here at HealthNOW Medical Center we have seen many cases of EoE and each one of them was associated with a food reaction, often gluten and dairy. And, because we practice what we preach, we have no trouble with our patients following our dietary and lifestyle change recommendations. If you know any youngster, adolescent or adult suffering with this condition, show them (or their parent) this article. A simple dietary change could be all that is needed to improve this serious condition. If your health is not at the level you desire, consider contacting us for a free health analysis—call 408-733-0400. Our destination clinic treats patients from across the country and internationally so you do not need to live local to us to receive care. We are here to help! Reference: Gastroenterology. 2014 Feb 14. pii: S0016-5085(14)00217-0. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2014.02.006. [Epub ahead of print]
  3. Celiac.com 09/09/2015 - Some researchers and clinicians suspect a connection between eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and celiac disease, but prior studies have shown conflicting results A team of researchers recently set out to determine the relationship between EoE and celiac disease among patients with concomitant esophageal and duodenal biopsies. The research team included Elizabeth T. Jensena, Swathi Eluria, Benjamin Lebwohl, Robert M. Gentab, and Evan S. Dellon. For their cross-sectional study, they team used data covering the period from January 2009 through June 2012 from a U.S. national pathology database. They defined esophageal eosinophilia as the presence of ≥15 eosinophils per high-power field. The crude and age and sex adjusted odds of esophageal eosinophilia for patients with active celiac disease were compared with those without celiac disease. Sensitivity analyses were performed by using more stringent case definitions and by estimating the associations between celiac disease and reflux esophagitis and celiac disease and Barrett’s esophagus. Out of 292,621 patients in the source population, the team looked at data from 88,517 patients with both esophageal and duodenal biopsies. Four thousand one hundred one (4.6%) met criteria for EoE, and 1203 (1.4%) met criteria for celiac disease. Patients with celiac disease had 26% higher odds of EoE than patients without celiac disease (adjusted odds ratio, 1.26; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.98–1.60). The strength of the connection varied according to EoE case definition, but all definitions showed a weak positive association between the two conditions. Interestingly, this study showed no connection between celiac disease and reflux esophagitis (adjusted odds ratio 0.95; 95% CI, 0.85–1.07) or between celiac disease and Barrett’s esophagus (adjusted odds ratio 0.89; 95% CI, 0.69–1.14). Overall, this study showed only a weak increase in EoE in patients with celiac disease. The connection strengthened in direct relation to the strength of definitions of EoE, and was not seen with other esophageal conditions. Doctors should consider concomitant EoE in patients with celiac disease where clinical indications support it. Disclosures: Dellon reports receiving research funds from Meritage Pharma, consulting for Aptalis, Novartis, Receptos and Regeneron, and receiving an educational grant from Diagnovus. Source: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. doi:10.1016/j.cgh.2015.02.018.
  4. Celiac.com 09/11/2014 - What’s the relationship, if any, between eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and celiac disease? Research studies have produced variable results. Researchers A. J. Lucendo, Á. Arias, and J. M. Teniaso recently set out to conduct a systematic review of medical literature to determine if there’s any evidence of a connection between both diseases. They used the MEDLINE, EMBASE and SCOPUS databases to conduct electronic searches with keywords relating to EoE and celiac disease. Depending on study heterogeneity, they used random-effects models as needed (I2). To assess publication bias, they used funnel plot analysis, along with the Begg–Mazumdar, Harbord and Egger tests. Their keyword search produced 197 significant study references; 30 were included in the quantitative summary, with most showing serious methodological inconsistencies. The team found significant publication bias in favor of short studies reporting positive connections between the two diseases. The prevalence of EoE in celiac patients ranged from 0% to 10.7% (I2 = 78.9%). Rates of celiac disease in EoE varied wildly, between 0.16% and 57.1% (I2 = 89%). One high-quality, prospective, randomly selected, population-based study showed a celiac disease rate of 1.1%, with no cases of EoE. Numerous quantitative summaries of celiac prevalence suffer from clinical and methodological differences. That is, they are are not similar enough to draw good conclusions. A gluten-free diet produced histological remission of EoE in 32.1% of celiac patients (95% confidence interval, 14.9–52.2%; I2 = 52.2%), which was similar to that expected for wheat elimination in EoE patients. There are not really enough valid studies to completely rule in or out a true association between EoE and celiac disease, currently available evidence does not support any such connection. In fact, the only epidemiologically valid study indicates that these diseases are not connected. Source: Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics Volume 40, Issue 5, pages 422–434, September 2014. DOI: 10.1111/apt.12859
  5. Celiac.com 06/28/2013 - Celiac disease has been linked to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), but there is very little data from population-based studies on the rates of shared disease among these groups. To get a better picture of the issue, a team of researchers recently set out to conduct a population-based study on rates of celiac disease in people with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). The research team included Jonas F. Ludvigsson, Pertti Aro, Marjorie M. Walker, Michael Vieth, Lars Agréus, Nicholas J. Talley, Joseph A. Murray, and Jukka Ronkainen. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Medicine at Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, in Stockholm, Sweden, the Department of Pediatrics at Örebro University Hospital in Örebro, Sweden, the Departments of Medicine and Immunology in the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Rochester, USA, the Department of NVS, Center for Family and Community Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, the Faculty of Health at the University of Newcastle in Newcastle, Australia, the Institute of Pathology in Bayreuth, Germany, the Primary Health Care Center of Tornio, Finland, and the Institute of Health Sciences at the University of Oulu in Oulu, Finland. For their study, the team conducted endoscopes on a thousand randomly selected adults from the general population. They defined celiac disease as positive serology together with mucosal abnormalities of the small intestine. They defined any eosinophil infiltration of the esophageal epithelium as esophageal eosinophilia and EoE was defined as having at least 15 eosinophils/high-power field in biopsies from the distal esophagus. They used Fisher's exact test to compare the prevalence of GORD, esophageal eosinophilia, and EoE in subjects with celiac disease, and to compare the realists with those of the control group. Of the 400 subjects (40%) with gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (GORS), 155 (15.5%) had erosive esophagitis, 16 (1.6%) had Barrett's esophagus, 48 (4.8%) had esophageal eosinophilia, and 11 (1.1%) had EoE. They diagnosed celiac disease in eight (2%) of the 400 individuals with GORS, compared to 10 of 600, or 1.7% for the control group (p = 0.81). They also diagnosed celiac disease in 3 of 155 subjects (1.9%) with erosive esophagitis, compared with 15 of 845 (1.7%) of control subjects (p = 0.75); and 2 cases of celiac disease from the 48 (4.2%) individuals with esophageal eosinophilia (controls were 16 of 952 (1.7%), p = 0.21). They found no celiac disease, however, in any of the 16 subjects with Barrett's esophagus, while they did find 18 cases among the 984, or 1.8% of control subjects; p = 1.0. Nor did they find celiac disease in any of the 11 individuals with EoE, compared with 18 cases in the 989, or 1.8% of control subjects; p = 1.0. Because this population-based showed no increased risk of celiac disease among individuals with GORD, esophageal eosinophilia, or EoE, they conclude that there is no need to conduct celiac screening of individuals with GORD, or EoE screening of individuals with celiac disease. Source: Informa Healthcare. doi:10.3109/00365521.2013.792389
  6. Celiac.com 01/04/2012 - A number of cases have led researchers to suspect a connection between eosinophilic esophagitis and celiac disease in children. A research team sought to confirm this association in children, and determine whether it extends into adulthood. To do this, they reviewed data from a group of celiac disease patients to learn the number of patients who also had a diagnoses of eosinophilic esophagitis. The team included Jennifer S. Thompson, MD, Benjamin Lebwohl, MD, MS, Norelle Rizkalla Reilly, MD, Nicholas J. Talley, MD, PhD, Govind Bhagat, MD, and Peter HR. Green, MD. For their study, they reviewed histopathology reports of esophageal biopsies to identify all cases of increased esophageal eosinophilia. The team defined cases of eosinophilic esophagitis as those where biopsies showed Z15 eosinophils per high power field and, which also included associated symptoms. Using published US population-derived incidence data as a reference, they formulated age- and sex-adjusted standardized incidence ratios with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). In all, the team found 4 children and 10 adults with eosinophilic esophagitis, which makes eosinophilic esophagitis more common in people with celiac disease than in the general population. Standardized incidence ratio was 35.6 (95% CI, 9.3-79.0) for children, and 13.1 (95% CI, 6.2-22.5) for adults. Overall, age-adjusted and sex-adjusted standardized incidence ratio was 16.0 (95% CI, 8.7-25.5). This study found higher rates of eosinophilic esophagitis in patients with celiac disease than in the general population. The researchers advise doctors to consider the possibility of eosinophilic esophagitis for celiac disease patients who suffer ongoing esophageal problems. Source: J Clin Gastroenterol. 2012 Jan;46(1):e6-e11.
×